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Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:36 PM

Which fiction authors were you sorry to hear had died?

The ones I thought of at once--

* Elizabeth Peters/Barbara Michaels

* Dick Francis

* Diana Wynne Jones

* Dorothy Dunnett

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Reply Which fiction authors were you sorry to hear had died? (Original post)
bobbieinok Feb 2019 OP
no_hypocrisy Feb 2019 #1
ProudLib72 Feb 2019 #2
Liberty Belle Feb 2019 #3
Lindsay Feb 2019 #4
rzemanfl Feb 2019 #31
TexasBushwhacker Feb 2019 #35
solara Feb 2019 #77
Stargleamer Feb 2019 #5
hedda_foil Feb 2019 #18
nolabear Feb 2019 #89
Loki Liesmith Feb 2019 #6
Laurian Feb 2019 #7
Kurt V. Feb 2019 #8
Srkdqltr Feb 2019 #9
Brother Buzz Feb 2019 #33
Fla Dem Feb 2019 #61
Ptah Feb 2019 #10
doc03 Feb 2019 #16
jalan48 Feb 2019 #19
bobbieinok Feb 2019 #21
k8conant Feb 2019 #11
Harker Feb 2019 #12
jberryhill Feb 2019 #13
PJMcK Feb 2019 #28
jberryhill Feb 2019 #34
fNord Feb 2019 #43
FailureToCommunicate Feb 2019 #57
Zoonart Feb 2019 #14
Brother Buzz Feb 2019 #36
Lars39 Feb 2019 #15
Shrike47 Feb 2019 #51
blogslut Feb 2019 #17
fNord Feb 2019 #45
blogslut Feb 2019 #47
fNord Feb 2019 #48
blogslut Feb 2019 #52
fNord Feb 2019 #49
yellowdogintexas Feb 2019 #72
hunter Feb 2019 #20
fNord Feb 2019 #46
ms liberty Feb 2019 #22
pamela Feb 2019 #23
The Blue Flower Feb 2019 #24
brush Feb 2019 #25
PoindexterOglethorpe Feb 2019 #26
tymorial Feb 2019 #27
Ferrets are Cool Feb 2019 #29
kimbutgar Feb 2019 #30
rzemanfl Feb 2019 #32
Leith Feb 2019 #37
bobbieinok Feb 2019 #59
eppur_se_muova Feb 2019 #38
shenmue Feb 2019 #39
petronius Feb 2019 #40
Aristus Feb 2019 #41
Dave Starsky Feb 2019 #64
Aristus Feb 2019 #65
Dave Starsky Feb 2019 #66
Aristus Feb 2019 #68
Dave Starsky Feb 2019 #69
ChazInAz Feb 2019 #74
fNord Feb 2019 #42
ChubbyStar Feb 2019 #44
Lucid Dreamer Feb 2019 #50
fierywoman Feb 2019 #53
Rhiannon12866 Feb 2019 #54
Totally Tunsie Feb 2019 #55
catrose Feb 2019 #56
FailureToCommunicate Feb 2019 #58
MH1 Feb 2019 #60
hunter Feb 2019 #70
Fla Dem Feb 2019 #62
solara Feb 2019 #78
Mme. Defarge Feb 2019 #83
Dave Starsky Feb 2019 #63
Zorro Feb 2019 #75
solara Feb 2019 #81
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2019 #67
Liberal Veteran Feb 2019 #71
yellowdogintexas Feb 2019 #73
MLAA Feb 2019 #76
yonder Feb 2019 #79
Triloon Feb 2019 #80
Onyrleft Feb 2019 #82
Mme. Defarge Feb 2019 #84
MaryMagdaline Feb 2019 #85
Hassler Feb 2019 #86
solara Feb 2019 #87
TlalocW Feb 2019 #88

Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:38 PM

1. Ian Fleming

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:39 PM

2. From any time in my life?

Ray Bradbury (I grew up reading all his novels and short stories)

Arthur C Clarke (I remembered him most from his TV shows, but I like his writing too)

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:39 PM

3. James Michener and Sue Grafton

are two that come to mind. I read many of their books.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:40 PM

4. Kurt Vonnegut.

That one still hurts.

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Response to Lindsay (Reply #4)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 10:23 PM

31. He broke his precious egg. n/t

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Response to Lindsay (Reply #4)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 10:39 PM

35. He was the first to come to mind n/t

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Response to Lindsay (Reply #4)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:11 AM

77. Yep that was heartbreaking N/T

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:42 PM

5. Octavia Butler n/t

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Response to Stargleamer (Reply #5)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:15 PM

18. Definitely!

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Response to Stargleamer (Reply #5)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:55 AM

89. Truly. She was brilliant.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:44 PM

6. Vonnegut

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:44 PM

7. Pat Conroy

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:45 PM

8. vonnegut

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:48 PM

9. Robert B. Parker

I miss Spencer.

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Response to Srkdqltr (Reply #9)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 10:37 PM

33. I miss Parker's Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch series

Fortunately Robert Knott got the green light to continue the series, and is doing a swell job.

I named my dog, 'Pearl the Wonder Dog' after all his Pearls in the Spencer series. I miss Spencer, too.

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Response to Srkdqltr (Reply #9)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 04:51 PM

61. Yes Robert Parker. Not only were the stories good, but they took place in the Boston area.

I could visualize the localities he was talking about and made it seem more real. Also enjoyed his descriptions of the meals he prepared. Shocked and saddened when he passed in January 2010.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:56 PM

10. Ivan Doig Tony Hillerman

Ivan Doig
Ivan Doig was an American author and novelist, widely known for his sixteen fiction and non-fiction books set mostly in his native Montana, celebrating the landscape and people of the post-war American West.


Tony Hillerman
Anthony Grove "Tony" Hillerman was an American author of detective novels and non-fiction works best known for his Navajo Tribal Police mystery novels. Several of his works have been adapted as theatrical and television movies.

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Response to Ptah (Reply #10)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:10 PM

16. I was also a Tony Hillerman fan. nt

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Response to Ptah (Reply #10)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:17 PM

19. This House of Sky is one of my favorites.

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Response to Ptah (Reply #10)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:24 PM

21. Just recently learned Hillerman had died. A fascinating author.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 07:58 PM

11. Kurt Vonnegut, Robert Heinlein, Ray Bradbury, Agatha Christie, C.S. Lewis

and more

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:03 PM

12. Edward Abbey, Philip K. Dick...

and many others.

I was reading "One Life at a Time, Please", by Abbey at the time he died. I had noticed the L.O.C. entry (1927- ) after his name in the forematter, and wondered "how long we would have ol' Ed Abbey around" the day prior to his death.

Two other authors died while I was reading their books within a couple years of that, but I've forgotten who they were.

Very odd.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:05 PM

13. God

 

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #13)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 09:26 PM

28. As always...

...you crack me up!

Have a good week, sir.

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Response to PJMcK (Reply #28)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 10:38 PM

34. I liked a lot of his early stuff

 

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #34)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 01:27 AM

43. Ah, yeah, Old Testament....

You should check out the sequel...there’s a twist...

Love thy neighbor


———Dr. Who

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Response to fNord (Reply #43)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 09:20 AM

57. AND, I have NOT been impressed with the movie(s). The Book was better.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:05 PM

14. Elmore Leonard

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Response to Zoonart (Reply #14)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 10:43 PM

36. I was sad he was only able to write two Chili Palmer books

They were both fantastic, but there was so much more could have done with Chili.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:05 PM

15. Dick Francis has a son that also writes

books.

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Response to Lars39 (Reply #15)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 02:40 AM

51. As does Tony Hillerman's daughter.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:13 PM

17. Terry Pratchett

It still hurts

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Response to blogslut (Reply #17)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 02:11 AM

45. My partner feels your pain.....

But I’ve still never read anything from him......except “Good Omens.”
But that was only half him.....

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Response to fNord (Reply #45)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 02:18 AM

47. Read him

He was just such a joy

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Response to blogslut (Reply #47)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 02:25 AM

48. Well, I do have some free time coming up......n/t

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Response to fNord (Reply #48)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 03:00 AM

52. A good starter book is Night Watch

It's how I was introduced to Pratchett. It's a fairly stand-alone story but it gives you enough of an overview of the whole of Discworld so you won't feel lost.

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Response to blogslut (Reply #47)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 02:26 AM

49. Good omens was awesome

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Response to blogslut (Reply #17)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 10:18 PM

72. absolutely

I have the luxury of not having read all of his books so I have much to look forward to!!!

My husband has read them all twice.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:20 PM

20. Orson Scott Card

You say he's not dead?

Well he is to me.

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Response to hunter (Reply #20)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 02:13 AM

46. Harrison ford needed the paycheck.....

His son was about to kill him and that was his last solid meal ticket

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:26 PM

22. My heart broke when Barbara Mertz (Elizabeth Peters) died

Also Douglas Adams, that one was really tough.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 08:41 PM

23. Pat Conroy. Kurt Vonnegut n/t

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 09:15 PM

24. Harper Lee

nt

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 09:20 PM

25. Elmore Leonard, a big favorite of mine.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 09:22 PM

26. Norah Lofts.

She was an English writer who wrote amazing historical novels. Her Town House Trilogy is fantastic. Often her novels were narrated by different people, with one person telling the story at one point in time, and another picking up some years later. As a consequence, you often get very different takes on the same character.

Most of her novels are set in England. One notable exception is a fictionalized version of the Donner Party, called "Winter Harvest".

She was publishing just about a book a year starting in 1936, until she died in 1982. I wish she had lived to be 100 and had been able to keep writing the entire time.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 09:24 PM

27. If scifi is included, Jack Chalker

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 09:28 PM

29. Robert Jordan before he finished his

masterpiece The Wheel of Time.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 09:30 PM

30. Jackie Collins, Lawrence Sanders

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 10:25 PM

32. DU's own Annette Apollo.

Known here as Old Leftie Lawyer and Tangerine LaBamba. December 2009, by her own hand. Miss her.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 10:53 PM

37. Isaac Asimov

I was more familiar with his factual essays and books (I grew up reading them), but I really liked The Caves of Steel, The Robot Series, and his short stories.



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Response to Leith (Reply #37)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 10:52 AM

59. Foundation series is one of my favorites

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 11:17 PM

38. Iain Banks. Loved his "Culture" novels. nt

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 11:52 PM

39. Frank Herbert and Colin Dexter

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 12:51 AM

40. Patrick O'Brian, Iain M. Banks are the first to come to mind... (nt)

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 12:58 AM

41. Harlan Ellison.

I'm a huge fan, and I got to have dinner with him once about thirteen years ago.

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Response to Aristus (Reply #41)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 05:37 PM

64. I am jealous of you.

I have always loved his work, too.

I have a copy of "The Essential Ellison" that I used to take with me when I traveled on business, on the off-chance that I might run into him at the airport. We apparently used to fly in and out of the same place.

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Response to Dave Starsky (Reply #64)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 05:48 PM

65. It was one of the most extraoirinary events of my life.

I'll never forget it.

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Response to Aristus (Reply #65)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 07:05 PM

66. He could be an enormous asshole.

But he could also be a super great guy, too, by all accounts. I think the bottom line is that he didn't suffer fools gladly. I was always afraid that if I ever got to meet him, he would think me a fool. Even if I was carrying a copy of "The Essential Ellison" in the airport. Maybe because I was carrying a copy of "The Essential Ellison" in the airport.

Anyway, he has always been one of my favorite writers for short form science fiction, either television or written. He and Ray Bradbury reign supreme in that era.

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Response to Dave Starsky (Reply #66)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 07:48 PM

68. Saying he doesn't suffer fools gladly is just a way of saying he doesn't suffer fools at all.

But to his fans, he was enormously friendly and gracious. He was always abrasive, but to his fans, it was affectionate. I brought my books to be signed at a Fantasy Lit convention, where we all wore name tags. When I got up to his table with my books, he looked at my name tag and immediately gave me a fun nickname based on my real name.

By pure accident, I ended up having dinner with him, his wife, and his small literary entourage. It's been said that you can discern a person's true nature by how they treat service workers. Well, our waiter had a thick Hispanic accent, and Harlan asked him: "Where are you from?"

I thought: "Oh God, NO; don't be rude to the guy!..."

"Mexico City, sir."

"Oh, I LOVE Mexico City!..." and proceeded to tell us some anecdotes of his visits there. He could not have been more gracious and charming to the waiter. It was wonderful to watch.

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Response to Aristus (Reply #68)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 09:12 PM

69. Exactly. I never wanted to be thought by him--my hero--to be a fool.

And so I eventually packed my "The Essential Ellison" away when I traveled. It's still a great book. It's still at the top of my bookshelf.


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Response to Aristus (Reply #41)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 11:52 PM

74. The world is smaller without him!

I had the honor of knowing Harlan. He was one of our tutors, inspirations and whip-crackers at workshops for science fiction (Er...Speculative Fiction! Sorry, Harlan.) writers. I admired him hugely.
Oddly, the other author I miss was another instructor: Fritz Leiber. Harlan was my teacher, but Fritz became my friend. We corresponded, called one another often, visited him once in his Geary Street apartment in San Francisco. Whatever modest success I had as a writer I owe especially to Fritz. Then, in the early Nineties, the letters and phone calls stopped. I called him, and his phone was disconnected. Eventually, I got hold of his son Justin and found out he'd left us.
Mithras, but I still miss him!

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 01:10 AM

42. Long list to be sure.....

But these Katz come to mind immediately.....

Kurt Vonnegut

Stan Lee

Gene Roddenberry

Robert Antwon Wilson

Jim Henson



Honorable mention, since he did pen a fiction novel......
The Good Doctor......Hunter S. Thompson
That one actually floored me....was inconsolable for days

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 02:00 AM

44. Raymond Carver

Brilliant man.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 02:33 AM

50. John Steinbeck...

I was alive when Steinbeck died.
The first book I read of his was Of Mice and Men.
That was an assignment in school. But then I couldn't stop.

Vonnegut was another one like that, and I still pick his books at random at the library to read or re-read.




Peculiar travel suggestions are dancing lessons from God -- Bokonon

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 03:05 AM

53. Heinrich Boll ("o" with umlaut but it won't stick here)

Last edited Mon Feb 25, 2019, 09:24 PM - Edit history (2)

He was an uncle by marriage and I wanted to meet him but didn't get to.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 05:08 AM

54. Oh, Dick Francis was my all time favorite!

After his wife/researcher passed on, he was going to retire, but then his son took over. I also got a kick out of the "Cat Who" books, Lilian Jackson Braun, and my mother read both authors, too.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 05:44 AM

55. J. D. Salinger and Tom Wolfe

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 09:10 AM

56. Sarah Cadogan

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 09:28 AM

58. Gene Roddenberry for sure, and Tony Hillerman. I got to hang with Roddenberry one

time...as he allowed me to screen a Star Trek bloopers reel at a conference. (He wanted to stay close and make sure I didn't "wander off" with it.)

And I just always love rereading Hillerman's Southwest mysteries. His daughter has written several, but, good as they are, they're not quite 'Hillerman level'.

-FTC

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Response to MH1 (Reply #60)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 09:45 PM

70. Yep.

Always Coming Home is one of my favorite books.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 05:08 PM

62. Sue Grafton, author of the Kinsey Millhone Alphabet Series

She was not able to finish the series. Her last book was Y is for Yesterday. I've read both that she never intended on finishing the alphabet, or that she became so ill after completing Y she was unable to even start Z is for..... These certainly weren't deep, conflicted, complex stories. They were perfect for a summer read on a chaise lounge or curled up on a sofa in front of a fire on a cold winter afternoon, or on a long flight or sitting in a terminal waiting for that flight. They certainly were my go to books.

Sue Grafton obituary
Trailblazing author of an alphabetical female detective series set in fictional Santa Teresa

Sue Grafton, who has died aged 77, was a trailblazing writer of American detective stories. Her 25 novels featuring the private eye Kinsey Millhone, which began with A is for Alibi in 1982 and extended through the alphabet to Y is for Yesterday (2016), established the hard-boiled female detective as a viable alternative to the males who had dominated the genre.

Millhone, an ex-cop and twice divorced, was a tough character, but in Grafton’s hands she also had a deep understanding of the effects on people of the crimes she investigated. This reflected Grafton’s major influence, Ross MacDonald, whose Lew Archer novels were marked by their relative lack of violence and their sharp perceptions of life in southern California. Grafton set her books in a Californian city called Santa Teresa, a fictionalised version of Santa Barbara, whose name she borrowed in homage to MacDonald.

More>>>
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jan/03/sue-grafton-obituary

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Response to Fla Dem (Reply #62)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:13 AM

78. So sad... N/T

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Response to Fla Dem (Reply #62)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:19 AM

83. Yes, and

Phillip Kerr. Very impressive research in his Bernie Gunther series.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 05:25 PM

63. John D. MacDonald

I devoured ALL of his Travis McGee books when I was a young man. I read some of his works in other genres (e.g., The Girl, The Gold Watch, and Everything) and they were all just as well-written, cerebral (yet relatable), and exciting as the "hard-boiled-detective-beach-bum-salvage-expert " series he was famous for. John D. MacDonald was a master of his craft.

He died not long after he published his last Travis McGee book. I have heard that he intended that last book to be a farewell to the character, and it ultimately was.

I have waited my whole life for there to be a good adaptation of any of MacDonald's Travis McGee novels to be delivered to the large or small screen. Hollywood had a couple weak tries back in the 1970s, with Sam Elliott and Rod Taylor in the lead role. But now they have Matthew McConnaughey to work with, and he is perfect. So get some good writers on the project, and let's get to work.

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Response to Dave Starsky (Reply #63)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:05 AM

75. I second that emotion

John D. MacDonald was one of my favorite authors, too.

I agree that Matthew McConnaughey would be well suited for the role of Travis McGee. It would be a hit franchise series for him.

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Response to Dave Starsky (Reply #63)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:15 AM

81. Travis Magee was one of my all time favorites.. sad day when McDonald left us N/T

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 07:22 PM

67. Richard Matheson and Jerome Bixby

I love their work.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 09:53 PM

71. Robert Jordan.

He died before finishing his book series. The last three volumes of the Wheel of Time ended up being written by another author who did a very good job of wrapping things up with the copious notes Jordan left, but didn't always capture Jordan's magic or handle on characters. Still, at least it got completed.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2019, 10:21 PM

73. Robert Ludlum and Tom Clancy - I love suspense/thrillers

I also was sad that Dorothy Dunnett had died I loved her books

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:08 AM

76. Manuel Vzquez Montalbn and Reginald Hill (of Dalziel and Pascoe fame)

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:14 AM

79. Wallace Stegner, Edward Abbey

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:14 AM

80. Henry Miller, Ernest Hemingway, Jack Kerouac, Richard Brautigan

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:15 AM

82. Douglas Adams

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:20 AM

84. Phillip Kerr.

I wrote to him and he wrote back!

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:20 AM

85. Elizabeth Enright

My sister and I wrote her a letter and her assistant wrote to us that she had died.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:31 AM

86. Ken Kesey and Ed Abbey.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:39 AM

87. There are more than I realized......

Maya Angelou
Kurt Vonnegut
Frank Herbert
Sue Grafton
John D. McDonald
Anne McCaffrey
Marion Zimmer Bradley
Sam Shepherd
Nora Ephron
Tony Hillerman
Robert Jordan
Raymond Carver
Douglas Adams
Jack Kerouac
Harper Lee




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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2019, 12:46 AM

88. Also Douglas Adams

He was a hoopy frood who really knew where his towel was.

TlalocW

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