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Tue Jul 10, 2018, 02:07 PM

German word order -verb last--2 theological comments, 1 business comment

Theological

1) German is the perfect eschatalogical language--everyone is waiting for the end.

2) Seminary students joke that all theological works in German come in 2 volumes: all the verbs are in the second one.

Business

German products have such a high international reputation because Germans are trained from birth to pay attention all the way to the end. (Comment made by a student in a college Business German course.)

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Reply German word order -verb last--2 theological comments, 1 business comment (Original post)
bobbieinok Jul 2018 OP
appalachiablue Jul 2018 #1
geardaddy Jul 2018 #2
bobbieinok Jul 2018 #3
The Velveteen Ocelot Jul 2018 #5
bobbieinok Jul 2018 #6
The Velveteen Ocelot Jul 2018 #7
aka-chmeee Jul 2018 #4
Leith Jul 2018 #8
aka-chmeee Jul 2018 #9

Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Jul 10, 2018, 02:10 PM

1. Studying German in college was wild, verbs at the end yep. Indian

friends from Punjab say that's the same in their language.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Jul 10, 2018, 02:35 PM

2. In the Celtic languages, the verb comes at the beginning.

Kind of Yoda-like.

Sang I the song.

Canais i'r cn.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Jul 10, 2018, 02:46 PM

3. Took me a while to see why I had no prob w/ German's 4 cases--6 cases in Latin

2 yrs of Latin in HS (and 2 yrs of French)--started German in sophomore yr of college (and 3 more yrs of French, 1 yr of Russian)

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Response to bobbieinok (Reply #3)

Tue Jul 10, 2018, 04:39 PM

5. After Latin everything else seems fairly easy.

Except for Icelandic.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #5)

Tue Jul 10, 2018, 05:00 PM

6. In grad school I took Old Norse and Advanced Old Norse. Icelandic the closest modern language?

Really liked some things we read. There was a short saga in which a young Thor constantly throws temper tantrums, swinging his hammer like mad.

Love German word for Thursday (Thors day) -- Donnerstag = thunder day (thunder is caused by Thor swinging his hammer)

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Response to bobbieinok (Reply #6)

Tue Jul 10, 2018, 05:50 PM

7. Icelandic is basically what Norwegian was 1,000 years ago (Old Norse).

That must have been an interesting study. Same days in modern Norwegian: Tuesday=Tirsdag (Tr's day), Wednesday=Onsdag (Odin's day), Thursday=Torsdag (Thor's day), Friday=Fredag (Freyja's day). Old Norse is also pretty closely related to Old English - both use the old letters thorn and eth. I took a short course on the Prose Edda recently - really fascinating stuff.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Tue Jul 10, 2018, 04:27 PM

4. Highly recommend Mark Twain's "The Awful German Language" nt

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Response to aka-chmeee (Reply #4)

Wed Jul 11, 2018, 10:30 PM

8. You Beat Me to It

"I would rather decline 2 beers than one German noun."

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Response to Leith (Reply #8)

Thu Jul 12, 2018, 07:12 AM

9. To me, one of the funniest essays he wrote.

As a casual(very) student of The Awful German Language, I see all of the demons which torture the native english speaker who's trying to learn German. Of course, you strip away just the havoc done to articles by gender and it becomes a little less unwieldy.
I have often wondered if the German reputation for precision is in any way connected to the strictures of their language.

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