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Thu Jun 14, 2018, 12:47 PM

Speaking of greens:

8 replies, 254 views

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Arrow 8 replies Author Time Post
Reply Speaking of greens: (Original post)
Floyd R. Turbo Jun 14 OP
aka-chmeee Jun 14 #1
Floyd R. Turbo Jun 14 #2
csziggy Jun 14 #3
Floyd R. Turbo Jun 15 #5
TexasBushwhacker Saturday #7
csziggy Saturday #8
Glorfindel Jun 14 #4
Floyd R. Turbo Jun 15 #6

Response to Floyd R. Turbo (Original post)

Thu Jun 14, 2018, 01:32 PM

1. Love it!

The rare occasions that this come on the radio always requires the volume be increased despite protests from mama.

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Response to aka-chmeee (Reply #1)

Thu Jun 14, 2018, 02:22 PM

2. Seize the moment! 👍🏻

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Response to Floyd R. Turbo (Original post)

Thu Jun 14, 2018, 09:10 PM

3. I always thought it was Poke Salad Annie?

I know we call the plant pokeweed - the leaves are edible at some point but I've never tried to eat them.

Phytolacca americana, the American pokeweed or simply pokeweed, is a herbaceous perennial plant in the pokeweed family Phytolaccaceae growing up to 8 feet (2 meters) in height. It is native to the eastern United States and has significant toxicity.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytolacca_americana


Names
P. americana is known as pokeberry,[3][6] poke root,[6] Virginia poke (or simply poke),[6][7] pigeonberry,[6][7] inkberry,[3] redweed or red ink plant.[7] When used in Chinese medicine, it is called chux shāngl (垂序商陸.[6][8][9] The plant and its cooked leaves are also called poke salad.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytolacca_americana#Names


Food uses

Poke is a traditional southern Appalachian food. The leaves and stems can both be eaten, but must be cooked, usually boiled three times in fresh water each time. The leaves have a taste similar to spinach; the stems taste similar to asparagus. To prepare stems, harvest young stalks prior to chambered pith formation, carefully peel the purple skin away, then chop the stalk up and fry in meal like okra. Traditionally, poke leaves are boiled, drained, boiled again, then fatback is added and cooked some more to add flavor. Poisonings occur from failure to drain the water from the leaves at least once. Preferably they should be boiled, drained, and water replaced two or more times.

As noted by the OARDC staff scientists:[10]

"Children are most frequently poisoned... [and] Infants are especially sensitive and have died from eating only a few raw berries. Although boiled young shoots have been eaten as greens and berries cooked in pie, ingestion of any part of the plant cannot be recommended. Adults have been poisoned, sometimes fatally, by eating improperly prepared leaves and shoots, especially if part of the root is harvested with the shoot, and by mistaking the root for an edible tuber."


Although all parts of the plant are considered toxic and the root is never eaten and cannot be made edible,[citation needed] the late 19th century herbal, the King's American Dispensatory, describes various folk medical uses that led individuals to ingest pokeberry products,[26] and festivals still celebrate the plant's use in its historical food preparations (see below). Authorities[who?] advise against eating pokeweed even after thrice boiling, as traces of toxins may still remain,[citation needed] and all agree pokeweed should never be eaten uncooked.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytolacca_americana#Food_uses


In music

A 1969 hit written and performed Tony Joe White, "Polk Salad Annie", is about poke sallet, the cooked greens-like dish made from pokeweed. The lyrics include:[35][36]

And in the fields looks somethin' like a turnip green
And everybody calls it polk salad, polk salad

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytolacca_americana#In_music


The thing I know best about the plant is that the birds love the dark red/black berries and shit them all over the horses' backs, leaving streaks of purple red running down their sides. For most horses that's not too bad but it is pretty difficult to remove on gray or light colored horses! Between pokeweed, beauty berries, and our red clay hills, owning a gray horse is not easy around here if you want them to look good.

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Response to csziggy (Reply #3)

Fri Jun 15, 2018, 11:47 AM

5. Thanks for the info! 👍🏻

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Response to csziggy (Reply #3)

Sat Jun 16, 2018, 09:26 AM

7. Boiling 3 times turns it to mush devoid of nutrients

The toxins build up as the plant grows. The mature plant has purple stems and a purple midline on the leaves. If you harvest it when it's young and green, about 1 to 2 feet high, and the midline is still green (not purple), toxicity isn't a problem.

Steam it for 4 to 5 minutes. Fry some bacon in a cast iron pan until it's crispy. Remove the bacon and stir fry the greens in the bacon grease. Add a squeeze of lemon, some black pepper and crumbled bacon - delish!

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Response to TexasBushwhacker (Reply #7)

Sat Jun 16, 2018, 11:59 AM

8. That's what I had read - eat it young or cook it to death

I've never had it but I think my grandmother made it in Alabama during the Depression so Mom had it when she was growing up.

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Response to Floyd R. Turbo (Original post)

Thu Jun 14, 2018, 09:19 PM

4. Her mama was "a wretched, spiteful, straight-razor totin' woman."

One of the most magnificent descriptive phrases in the English language. The song itself is above all comparison. "Chawmp, chawmp," exactly describes the noise an alligator makes while devouring someone's grandmother. Please don't ask me how I know.

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #4)

Fri Jun 15, 2018, 11:48 AM

6. So, that's what you did with the body! 😏

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