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Sun Jan 11, 2015, 11:27 AM

John F. Kennedy in New Ross and Wexford, Ireland: June 27, 1963



Note how he was proud to travel to Ireland with a leader of American labor.

Thanks to the great DUer, MinM!

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 11:41 AM

1. That seems almost like another world.

When Democrats were for labor.

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Response to zeemike (Reply #1)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 12:05 PM

2. JFK battled Wall Street and Big Business

"If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich"
-- Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy, Friday, January 20, 1961




So, in the short time he had, President Kennedy did what he could to balance the interests of concentrated wealth with the interests of the average American -- necessary for the good of the country.

Professor Donald Gibson detailed the issues in his 1994 book, Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency.

From the book:



"What (J.F.K. tried) to do with everything from global investment patterns to tax breaks for individuals was to re-shape laws and policies so that the power of property and the search for profit would not end up destroying rather than creating economic prosperity for the country."

-- Donald Gibson, Battling Wall Street. The Kennedy Presidency



More on the book, by two great Americans:



"Gibson captures what I believe to be the most essential and enduring aspect of the Kennedy presidency. He not only sets the historical record straight, but his work speaks volumes against today's burgeoning cynicism and in support of the vision, ideal, and practical reality embodied in the presidency of John F. Kennedy - that every one of us can make a difference." -- Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez, Chair, House Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs

"Professor Gibson has written a unique and important book. It is undoubtedly the most complete and profound analysis of the economic policies of President Kennedy. From here on in, anyone who states that Kennedy was timid or status quo or traditional in that field will immediately reveal himself ignorant of Battling Wall Street. It is that convincing." -- James DiEugenio, author, Destiny Betrayed. JFK, Cuba, and the Garrison Case --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.



Had he lived to serve a second term, I'd bet on JFK and Labor over The Fed and Goldman Sach's Too Big To Fail chums.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #2)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 12:26 PM

4. And he would have been re elected no doubt.

He was widely popular with most people...and hated by some.
I was 20 when he was killed and saw the ones who hated him cheer.

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 12:20 PM

3. Here's a transcript of that speech June, 1963...

I did a little research, Octafish… Ref: http://remembertheintrepid.blogspot.com/2009/09/jfk-john-barry-both-wexford-boys.html

I'm not Irish, but after considering the history your ancestors, it convinces me that history from the people's point of view is not so much what led him into that presidency, but kept his focus until the end of it.

276 - Remarks at Redmond Place in Wexford
June 27, 1963

Mr. Mayor, Chairman of the Council, Mr. Minister, my friends:

I want to express my pleasure at being back from whence I came. There is an impression in Washington that there are no Kennedys left in Ireland, that they are all in Washington, so I wonder if there are any Kennedys in this audience. Could you hold up your hand so I can see?

Well, I am glad to see a few cousins who didn't catch the boat.

And I am glad to take part in this ceremony this morning for John Barry. I have had in my office since I was President the flag that he flew and the sword that he wore. It is no coincidence that John Barry and a good many of his successors played such a leading part in the American struggle, not only for independence, but for its maintenance.

About 2 months ago I visited the Battle of Gettysburg, the bloodiest battlefield in the American Civil War, and one of the monuments to the dead was to the Irish Brigade. In Fredericksburg, which was another slaughter, the Irish Brigade was nearly wiped out. They went into battle wearing a sprig of green in their hats and it was said of them what was said about Irishmen in other countries: "War battered dogs are we, gnawing a naked bone, fighting in every land and clime, for every cause but our own."

It seems to me that in these dangerous days when the struggle for freedom is worldwide against an armed doctrine, that Ireland and its experience has one special significance, and that is that the people's fight, which John Boyle O'Reilly said outlived a thousand years, that it was possible for a people over hundreds of years of foreign domination and religious persecution--it was possible for that people to maintain their national identity and their strong faith. And therefore those who may feel that in these difficult times, who may believe that freedom may be on the run, or that some nations may be permanently subjugated and eventually wiped out, would do well to remember Ireland.

And I am proud to come here for another reason, because it makes me even prouder of my own country. My country welcomed so many sons and daughters of so many countries, Irish and Scandinavian, Germans, Italian, and all the rest, and gave them a fair chance and a fair opportunity. The Speaker of the House of Representatives is of Irish descent. The leader of the Senate is of Irish descent. And what is true of the Irish has been true of dozens of other people. In Ireland I think you see something of what is so great about the United States; and I must say that in the United States, through millions of your sons and daughters and cousins-25 million, in fact--you see something of what is great about Ireland.

So I am proud to be here. I am proud to have connected on that beautiful golden box the coat of arms of Wexford, the coat of arms of the kingly and beautiful Kennedys, and the coat of arms of the United States. That is a very good combination.

Thank you.


I also read the words to the ballad about an insurrection in 1798…

On the second day of his four-day trip to Ireland, the president travelled by helicopter this morning to County Wexford.

Hundreds of well wishers cheered and waved flags on his arrival at Wexford town and a choir of 300 boys greeted him singing "The Boys of Wexford", a ballad about an insurrection in 1798.


The Boys of Wexford

(Chorus):
We are the boys of Wexford,
Who fought with heart and hand
To burst in twain the galling chain
And free our native land.

In comes the captain's daughter,
The captain of the Yeos,
Saying "Brave United Irishmen,
We'll ne'er again be foes.
A thousand pounds I'll bring
If you will fly from home with me,
And dress myself in man's attire
And fight for liberty."

I want no gold, my maiden fair,
To fly from home with thee.
You shining eyes will be my prize,
More dear than gold to me.
I want no gold to nerve my arm
To do a true man's part -
To free my land I'd gladly give
The red drops of my heart."

And when we left our cabins, boys,
We left with right good will
To see our friends and neighbours
That were at Vinegar Hill!
A young man from our Irish ranks
A cannon he let go;
He slapt it into Lord Mountjoy
A tyrant he laid low!

We bravely fought and conquered
At Ross and Wexford town;
And if we failed to keep them,
'Twas drink that brought us down.
We had no drink beside us
On Tubberneering's day,
Depending on the long, bright pike,
And well it worked that way.

And Oulart's name shall be their shame,
Whose steel we ne'er did fear.
For every man could do his part
Like Forth and Shelmalier!
And if for want of leaders,
We lost at Vinegar Hill,
We're ready for another fight,
And love our country still!


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Response to MrMickeysMom (Reply #3)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 12:36 PM

5. I'm not Irish, but I wish I were. Those words make me very proud of Ireland, its people and the USA.

Thank you, MrMickeysMom! I tried finding the PBS documentary, JFK: A Homecoming, came close:

http://jfkhomecoming.com/

In seeing the words written out, it becomes very clear what the nation lost that awful day 51 years ago.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #5)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 04:40 PM

8. You are hereby knighted as an honoray Irishman/Irishwoman

Welcome to the "Club" and ...

"There are only two kinds of people in the world, The Irish and those who wish they were."



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Response to CountAllVotes (Reply #8)

Mon Jan 12, 2015, 08:08 AM

13. Thank you, CountAllVotes!

You've very much made my days.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #13)

Mon Jan 12, 2015, 03:40 PM

16. You are very welcome!

The Irish are known for adopting other people.

I'm glad this gave you a .

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 01:08 PM

6. JFK was receiving death threats during that trip too ..

More on that at the link below ..

A Kennedy's Journey Home (Ireland - 06/26/63)(audio)

Thanks for posting, Octafish

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Response to MinM (Reply #6)

Mon Jan 12, 2015, 09:41 AM

14. Incredible.

Unlike Dallas, at least the Secret Service rode with him part of the way in Ireland.

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 03:50 PM

7. Proud to be Irish American!

Ireland!

Message. to Ireland:

Céad Míle Fáilte to the Irish people: America loves the Irish.

There are many of us living here in America (last count was close to 50 million persons!!) and we have fought hard and worked even harder to make America the country that it is.

JFK is an example of just one fine Irishman!

& recommend!!

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 05:29 PM

9. I love the story about the photo of the White House being sent back to neighbors in Ireland

to show them how well they were doing in America and explaining how the White House was their summer home-too funny..


But just as important as humor is the efforts to keep freedom alive. Now more than ever it is just as important as when Kennedy remarked in this 1960 footage that when those who needed encouragement in working towards freedom to look to Ireland…


While the Irish today have to be just as vigilant as her Irish cousins and neighbors in America are learning today… Freedom can't be exchanged for some piecrust nonsense about safety….

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Sun Jan 11, 2015, 11:55 PM

10. I love President Kennedy and always will.

We lost, the world lost, so much on that devastating day he was murdered.

I was 14 years old that horrible day and there was despair everywhere. Our hope, our good feeling for the future, just everything was shattered. Our hearts broke for our beloved president.

He would be appalled to see this country and the whole world at the state it's in now.

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Response to montana_hazeleyes (Reply #10)

Mon Jan 12, 2015, 05:58 AM

12. Yes, I'll sadly 2nd this remark...oh, I remember him so well...

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Mon Jan 12, 2015, 12:24 AM

11. I've been to New Ross twice. It's a lovely little town with their fair share of immigrants.

Wexford seems to be a popular destination for Czechs. Everywhere you go in New Ross there is a Kennedy shrine of some sort.

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Response to Octafish (Original post)

Mon Jan 12, 2015, 02:58 PM

15. I read where he told his best friend, Dave Powers, that this was best time of his life.

He adored Ireland.

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