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Tue Apr 7, 2020, 12:06 AM

After Virus Fades, Service Industries May Be Changed Forever

April 6, 2020, WASHINGTON (AP) — For years, personal trainer Amanda Tikalsky didn’t have to worry much about her job. The U.S. economy’s record-breaking 11-year expansion offered security to service workers like her. Then came the coronavirus, which closed the Milwaukee athletic club where she worked for 15 years. She scrambled to organize online exercise sessions to keep money coming in. About 25% of her clients made the jump with her. “It’s an adjustment for everybody,” she said. “We are used to being face to face.” But even when the virus threat is gone, Tikalsky predicts that many customers will continue to exercise from home. The shutdown is also likely to change her own shopping habits. She has a new appreciation for the ease of buying groceries online.

The pandemic is almost sure to leave a mark on the way people work, shop and socialize, perhaps permanently shifting the way many service industries operate. Consumers will think harder about the health implications of squeezing into crowded restaurants and movie theaters. More businesses will accept the effectiveness of employees who work from home, and the move to online shopping will accelerate. “We’ve never had a crisis where we couldn’t socially gather with people,” said John Gordon, founder of Pacific Management Consulting Group in San Diego, which advises restaurants.

Until March, service workers — from dishwashers to real estate agents — had been enjoying a record winning streak in the job market. U.S. service jobs had risen for a decade.

The sector appeared almost immune to blips in the economy. Not even low-wage competition overseas or automation seemed to threaten service jobs that require direct contact with customers. Then the virus arrived. It upended the service economy, which accounts for 84% of U.S. private-sector employment. It wiped out 659,000 service jobs in March — 94% of the jobs that vanished last month as the U.S. economy plunged into recession. It is sure to claim many more. In an interview Monday on CNBC, former Fed Chair Janet Yellen predicted that unemployment rates could climb to Great Depression levels. But because the economy was in solid shape before the outbreak, she added, the return to normal employment could happen much faster than during the Depression or after the 2007-2009 Great Recession.

When the economy goes into a nosedive, manufacturers, not services providers, are usually hit first and hardest.

Not this time. The virus has been a gut punch to businesses that depend on social gatherings — restaurants, cinemas, theaters, hotels, airlines, gyms, shopping centers. More than 250,000 stores are now temporarily closed, accounting for nearly 60% of retail square footage, according to Neil Saunders, managing director of GlobalData Retail, a research firm.
The situation is similar in many other countries. In Wuhan, China, where the viral outbreak began, consumers are still reluctant to go out shopping as conditions slowly head back to normal. Josh Rivas is among the millions of job casualties in the U.S. He works at a Subway at a rest stop in Connecticut where he and co-workers were laid off because of the virus amid dwindling traffic at the plaza. “We can’t afford for us to miss a day of pay because we have families that we need to take care of and bills we need to pay,” he said.

In recessions, factories are often the first to slash jobs, and they don’t always bring them back. American manufacturers still employ 918,000 fewer workers than they did before the Great Recession. Over the same period, service employment is up by nearly 14 million.

Economists are divided over whether service employees will face the kind of economic disruption factory workers have endured...
More, https://apnews.com/0aa967875547c5d63f22575dd2cf1aaa

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Reply After Virus Fades, Service Industries May Be Changed Forever (Original post)
appalachiablue Apr 7 OP
SheltieLover Apr 7 #1
The Magistrate Apr 7 #2
appalachiablue Apr 7 #3
The Magistrate Apr 7 #4
appalachiablue Apr 7 #5
Jamastiene Apr 7 #6

Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Apr 7, 2020, 12:11 AM

1. LLet's hope

Everyone who can will be able to continue working from home!

I miss eating out. 💔

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Apr 7, 2020, 12:15 AM

2. Here Are Some Paragraphs Form It, Ma'am

Until March, service workers — from dishwashers to real estate agents — had been enjoying a record winning streak in the job market. U.S. service jobs had risen for a decade.

The sector appeared almost immune to blips in the economy. Not even low-wage competition overseas or automation seemed to threaten service jobs that require direct contact with customers.

Then the virus arrived. It upended the service economy, which accounts for 84% of U.S. private-sector employment. It wiped out 659,000 service jobs in March — 94% of the jobs that vanished last month as the U.S. economy plunged into recession.



When the economy goes into a nosedive, manufacturers, not services providers, are usually hit first and hardest.

Not this time. The virus has been a gut punch to businesses that depend on social gatherings — restaurants, cinemas, theaters, hotels, airlines, gyms, shopping centers. More than 250,000 stores are now temporarily closed, accounting for nearly 60% of retail square footage, according to Neil Saunders, managing director of GlobalData Retail, a research firm.

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Response to The Magistrate (Reply #2)

Tue Apr 7, 2020, 12:27 AM

3. Thanks much, I finally got the computer to get in gear too

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #3)

Tue Apr 7, 2020, 12:29 AM

4. Glad You Got It In Order, Ma'am

Do you want me to delete?

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Response to The Magistrate (Reply #4)

Tue Apr 7, 2020, 12:30 AM

5. No delete, it's ok

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Response to The Magistrate (Reply #2)

Tue Apr 7, 2020, 12:30 AM

6. You are always so nice and helpful.

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