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Fri Oct 18, 2019, 07:37 AM

Photos from Richard Baer, Commandment of Auschwitz, May44-Jan 45

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Reply Photos from Richard Baer, Commandment of Auschwitz, May44-Jan 45 (Original post)
irisblue Oct 18 OP
appalachiablue Oct 18 #1
irisblue Oct 18 #3
appalachiablue Oct 19 #4
Moral Compass Oct 18 #2


Response to appalachiablue (Reply #1)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 11:13 AM

3. Thank you for posting that, I'm sure that I would never have seen it

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Response to irisblue (Reply #3)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 07:24 AM

4. For sure, an incredible story. I never knew about it until I saw this

piece posted here c. 2016. The DC dress shop Brigitte worked in many years, I think I know it. Unbelievable.

*Brigitte no doubt acquired her fashion taste from her mother Hedwig Hoess. MORE:

Dressmakers for the Nazis at Auschwitz,
https://www.historyextra.com/period/second-world-war/sewing-for-the-nazis-who-were-the-dressmakers-of-auschwitz/

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 09:28 AM

2. Highly recommended

I spent a decade or so fascinated with The Holocaust. I read everything there was at the time—including Hoess’s memoir/biography.

I was looking for some insight, some clue as to how an evil this enormous could have been committed.

What I found was a tapestry of ordinariness. A bureaucratizarion of extermination. Only Mengele stood out as actively evil. The rest were just doing their jobs—plodding through their days—trying to not perceive the horrors in which they were utterly complicit.

This was the most stunning realization—that ordinary men and women—when swallowed by the machinery of evil would dutifully carry out their tasks—even if that was to kill their fellow humans.

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