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Sat Sep 21, 2019, 06:30 PM

Be Prepared: Find The ER You Want To Use Before An Emergency Happens: ProPublica

- Be Prepared: Find the ER You Want to Go to Before an Emergency Happens.- Use our updated emergency room database to find an ER near you, view quality and violations data, learn about wait times before admission, and find out how long patients typically spend before they are sent home. ProPublica, Sept. 19, 2019.

To be prepared in the event of an emergency, you can use our newly updated ER Inspector (formerly called ER Wait Watcher) to help you evaluate the emergency rooms near you. Using data from the federal government, our interactive database lets you compare ERs on both efficiency measures, including how long patients typically spend in the ER before being sent home, and quality measures, such as how many violations related to ER care a hospital has had.

Note: If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or other life-threatening emergency, do not use ER Inspector. Call 911 and seek care immediately.



-- Ambulances outside a hospital in Poplar Bluffs, Missouri.

We’ve made a few substantial changes and upgrades to ER Inspector since it first came out in 2013. Notably, we’ve added hospital violations related to emergency room care since 2015. We’ve also removed two measures that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) no longer releases.

- New: ER Violations Data:

Hospitals in the U.S. that participate in Medicare are subject to health and safety regulations. They are inspected regularly every few years and also in response to complaints. CMS only publicly releases violations found during the investigation of a complaint — you can now see all of those emergency room violations since January 2015 in ER Inspector.

- How to Prepare for an Emergency: Don’t wait until an emergency happens before you do your research:

Use ER Inspector to find the right emergency room near you. We’ve also put together a helpful planning toolkit so that you can have this important information close at hand when you really need it.

While CMS releases data on all types of hospital violations, or “deficiencies,” we pulled out the ones related to ER care. These include violations relating to not properly assessing and treating patients, inadequate medical and nursing staff and not following ER policies and procedures. It also includes violations of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), which requires ERs to provide a medical screening examination and provide treatment to stabilize anyone who comes to the emergency department, regardless of their ability to pay. ER Inspector now displays the percentage of hospitals in each state with at least one violation since January 2015, as well as a full explanation of each violation on each hospital page.

- Still Here: What it Means to Have “Timely and Effective Care”:

To demonstrate how well their emergency rooms provide “timely and effective care,” hospitals report a few key measures on a quarterly basis, all of which you can see in our database:

•Time Until Sent Home: The average time patients spent in the emergency room before being sent home if they weren’t admitted.
•Left Without Being Seen: The percentage of patients who left the emergency room without being seen by a doctor.
•Time Before Admission: The average time patients spent in the emergency room before being admitted to the hospital.
•Transfer Time: Among patients who were admitted, the additional time they spent waiting before being taken to their room.
•CT Scan: Percentage of patients who arrived with stroke symptoms and received brain scan results within 45 minutes. In ER Inspector we reverse this measure and display the percentage that did not receive a brain scan within 45 minutes.

While timing can vary depending on why someone came to the ER (a sprained ankle may take less time to treat than unexplained chest pain), long wait times are often signals of overcrowding or staff shortages.

- Removed: Wait Time Before Seeing a Doctor: CMS removed two ER quality measures in April 2019:

The first was a measure of the average time patients spent in the ER before being seen by a doctor. In a 2018 rule, CMS outlined several concerns with the measure, including that it was not linked to improved patient outcomes, and that the wait times and reported time stamps were not always valid or accurate...

https://www.propublica.org/article/prepared-find-the-er-you-want-to-go-to-before-an-emergency-happens

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Reply Be Prepared: Find The ER You Want To Use Before An Emergency Happens: ProPublica (Original post)
appalachiablue Sep 21 OP
The Velveteen Ocelot Sep 21 #1
in2herbs Sep 21 #3
pangaia Sep 21 #2
appalachiablue Sep 21 #5
pangaia Sep 21 #7
PoindexterOglethorpe Sep 21 #4
appalachiablue Sep 21 #6
NickB79 Sep 22 #8

Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sat Sep 21, 2019, 06:37 PM

1. Can you even choose one? If I'm lying in the street

after being run over by a bus, someone (I hope) will call 911, which will dispatch an ambulance from somewhere; and when that ambulance shows up do I get to tell them which hospital to take me to, assuming I'm in any shape to argue? I'm less than three miles from a Level 1 trauma center, so I hope they take me there.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #1)

Sat Sep 21, 2019, 07:27 PM

3. When I was working at a hospital the trauma people said that the helicopter people

chose where to send the trauma patient via a wallet biopsy, meaning whichever hospital supported the trauma helicopter people the best was where they were sent.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sat Sep 21, 2019, 06:39 PM

2. " Removed: Wait Time Before Seeing a Doctor: CMS removed two ER quality measures in April 2019:"

WHY in the world would they remove that?

Seems pretty darn important to me

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Response to pangaia (Reply #2)

Sat Sep 21, 2019, 10:10 PM

5. It's the CMS and no, it's not good.

From the intro.: "We’ve made a few substantial changes and upgrades to ER Inspector since it first came out in 2013. Notably, we’ve added hospital violations related to emergency room care since 2015.

> We’ve also removed two measures that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) no longer releases."

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #5)

Sat Sep 21, 2019, 10:44 PM

7. thanks...

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sat Sep 21, 2019, 08:44 PM

4. And that's assuming you have more than one ER

near you.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #4)

Sat Sep 21, 2019, 10:12 PM

6. Correct, for persons who live in a well functiong metro area and not

smaller towns and communities where hospitals and medical staff are consolidating or disappearing.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sun Sep 22, 2019, 07:14 PM

8. The nearest hospital is 10 miles away

The next-nearest is 20 miles.

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