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Thu Feb 14, 2019, 02:47 PM

Violence Against Native American Women


Violence Against Native American Women

Savanna’s Act, a bill that calls for the standardization of protocols for law enforcement agencies and for updating data for federal databases relevant to missing or murdered Native American women, was re-introduced to the floor on Monday by Alaska Senator Lisa Murkoski.

Savanna’s Act is named in honor of Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind, a pregnant Spirit Lake tribe member, who was murdered in South Dakota in 2017. Originally, Senator Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota introduced the bill in October 2017 to address the violence that afflicts Native American women. Last year, the act passed in the Senate but was killed by Republican Bob Goodlatte in the House Judiciary Committee in 2018.

In the US, there is an epidemic of violence against Native American women that Congress has not addressed. Over half of Native American women are victims of sexual assault and a third of Native women are raped. These rates are double that of white women. Homicide is the third leading cause of death for Native women ages 15 to 24 in and outside of tribal land.

The authority and power of tribal law enforcement has been challenged and limited by the US government. Oliphant v. Suquamish Indian Tribe, a 1978 Supreme Court case, provides immunity to non-Native Americans offenders through limiting the authority of tribal law enforcement. This thereby weakens tribal authority and compromises the safety of tribe members. The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 tried to remedy the issue of jurisdiction, but it did not completely reestablish complete jurisdiction to tribal authority.

Savanna’s Act is a starting point to help protect one of the most marginalized groups in our country. As the number of missing and murdered women continues to grow, more attention needs to be given to this epidemic and Savanna’s Act is just the start of the solution.

http://feminist.org/blog/index.php/2019/02/13/violence-against-native-american-women/



Ending Violence Against Native Women



In the United States, violence against indigenous women has reached unprecedented levels on tribal lands and in Alaska Native villages. More than 4 in 5 American Indian and Alaska Native women have experienced violence, and more than 1 in 2 have experienced sexual violence. Alaska Native women continue to suffer the highest rate of forcible sexual assault and have reported rates of domestic violence up to 10 times higher than in the rest of the United States. Though available data is limited, the number of missing and murdered American Indian and Alaska Native women and the lack of a diligent and adequate federal response is extremely alarming to indigenous women, tribal governments, and communities. On some reservations, indigenous women are murdered at more than ten times the national average.

Statistics define the scale of the problem, but do nothing to convey the experience of the epidemic. They tell part of the story, but fail to account for the devastating impacts this violence has on the survivors, Indian families, Native communities, and Indian nations themselves. Native children exposed to violence suffer rates of PTSD three times higher than the rest of the general population. Nevertheless, the statistics make absolutely clear that violence against Native women is a crisis that cannot wait to be addressed.

The Center’s Safe Women, Strong Nations project partners with Native women’s organizations and Indian and Alaska Native nations to end violence against Native women and girls. Our project raises awareness to gain strong federal action to end violence against Native women; provides legal advice to national Native women’s organizations and Indian nations on ways to restore tribal criminal authority; and helps Indian nations increase their capacity to prevent violence and punish offenders on their lands.



RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AND DENIAL OF EQUALITY UNDER THE LAW

It is outrageous that the vast majority of these women never see their abusers or rapists brought to justice. An unworkable, race-based criminal jurisdictional scheme created by the United States has limited the ability of Indian nations to protect Native women from violence and to provide them with meaningful remedies. For more than 35 years, United States law has stripped Indian nations of all criminal authority over non-Indians. As a result, until recent changes in the law, Indian nations were unable to prosecute non-Indians, who reportedly commit the vast majority (96%) of sexual violence against Native women. The Census Bureau reports that non-Indians now comprise 76% of the population on tribal lands and 68% of the population in Alaska Native villages. Many Native women have married non-Indians. However, it is unacceptable that a non-Indian who chooses to marry a Native woman, live on her reservation, and commit acts of domestic violence against her, cannot be criminally prosecuted by an Indian nation and more often than not will never be prosecuted by any government.

. . . . .

https://indianlaw.org/issue/ending-violence-against-native-women

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Response to niyad (Original post)

Thu Feb 14, 2019, 04:32 PM

1. Unforgivable treatment of Native women for all these years, always ignored by corporate media, too.

Can't imagine how it is justified. It's criminal negligence.

Please let me refresh memories concerning a towering pile of #### who raped an indigenous woman in South Dakota went unchecked on that crime and became a South Dakota Congressman:

Wikipedia:
Bill Janklow

. . .

Early life
Janklow was born in Chicago, Illinois. When Janklow was 10 years old his father died of a heart attack while working as a prosecutor at the Nuremberg Trials in Germany.[2] His mother moved the family back to the United States, and in 1954 when Janklow was 15, they settled in her home town of Flandreau, South Dakota.[3] Following a series of scrapes with the law, Janklow was ordered by a judge to either join the military or attend reform school.[3] Janklow dropped out of high school and joined the U.S. Marine Corps, serving from 1956 to 1959.[3] He graduated from the University of South Dakota in 1964 with a BS in business administration and then went on to earn a J.D. at the University of South Dakota School of Law in 1966. He then worked as Legal Services lawyer for six years on the Rosebud Indian Reservation, advancing to direct the program there.

. . .

State attorney general
In 1974, Janklow was the successful Republican nominee for attorney general, and he served from 1975 to 1979. Among the highlights of his term were two cases he argued before the United States Supreme Court, South Dakota v. Opperman and Rosebud Sioux Tribe v. Kneip.[5] In Opperman, Janklow argued successfully (5 Justices to 4) that a warrantless search of a vehicle that had been impounded for a parking violation was permissible.[6] (The South Dakota Supreme Court later suppressed the search on state constitutional grounds.)[6] In Rosebud, Janklow successfully argued (6 Justices to 3) the legality of federal statutes which had reduced the size of the Rosebud Indian Reservation without regard to the provisions of existing treaties between the tribe and the federal government.[6]

. . .

Controversial history
Jacinta Eagle Deer
In 1974, a month before the election for state attorney general for which Janklow was a candidate, Jacinta Eagle Deer filed a petition through her attorney Larry Leventhal and tribal advocate Dennis Banks to disbar Janklow to keep him from practicing in tribal court. According to Banks, in early 1967 Jacinta Eagle Deer, then a 15-year-old Lakota schoolgirl at the Rosebud Boarding School on the Rosebud Indian Reservation, reported to her school principal that Janklow, for whom she was working as a babysitter, had raped her on January 13. He was said to be her legal guardian.[9]

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), responsible for law enforcement on the reservation at the time, allegedly sent the police investigation case file of the rape (for which it had custody) to its Aberdeen, South Dakota office to keep it away from the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Court.[10]

Judge Mario Gonzalez of the Rosebud Indian Reservation tribal court granted Eagle Deer's petition to disbar Janklow from practicing law on the Rosebud Reservation. At the request of Eagle Deer's attorneys, the tribal court "issued a misdemeanor arrest warrant for Janklow based on sworn testimony on Eagle Deer's behalf (since it was generally believed at the time that tribal courts had jurisdiction over non-Indians)", but no arrest was made.[10] Janklow denied all allegations connected with the rape case, and no criminal charges were filed.

In 1975, Janklow was investigated by the FBI before being nominated as a candidate for appointment to the board of the Legal Services Corporation. The White House Counsel passed on its recommendation to the Senate Judiciary Committee (which would vote on the nomination), saying its investigation of the rape case concluded there was insufficient evidence.[11]

In April 1975, Jacinta Eagle Deer was killed at night in a hit-and-run accident in southern Nebraska. After her death, Jacinta's step-mother, Delphine Eagle Deer, sister of Leonard Crow Dog, advocated on the young woman's behalf. Delphine Eagle Deer was murdered in an as yet unsolved case about nine months later in 1976.[12]

. . .

More:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Janklow

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #1)

Thu Feb 14, 2019, 04:35 PM

2. thank you for that necessary reminder.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #1)

Thu Feb 14, 2019, 06:28 PM

3. my god...

and how many times was this story repeated....disgusted and saddened beyond words...

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Response to dhill926 (Reply #3)

Fri Feb 15, 2019, 01:11 PM

4. it has happened way too often. THIS is a real national emergency.

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Response to niyad (Original post)

Thu Mar 21, 2019, 04:03 PM

5. Thank you for posting this article.

I've just become aware of this continued assault on Native women. It's heartbreaking.

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Response to mia (Reply #5)

Fri Mar 22, 2019, 12:18 PM

6. you are most welcome. I have been appalled about the silence on this horrific subject.

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