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Sun Jun 3, 2018, 02:15 PM

*POVERTY is Rising Faster in US Suburbs Than in Cities-Here's Why,* New Pew Research

*Poverty is Rising Faster in US Suburbs Than in Cities-- Here's Why* Business Insider, Scott W. Allard, June 3, 2018

-Poverty is consuming more suburban counties than ever, beating out rural and urban areas.
-Poverty is growing 3 times faster than population size in suburban communities across the country, acc. to recent research.
-Here's why the US geography of poverty is shifting from cities to suburbs.

In the US, the geography of poverty is shifting.

According to a May report from the Pew Research Center, since 2000, suburban counties have experienced sharper increases in poverty than urban or rural counties. This is consistent with research across the U.S. over the past decade - as well as my own book, "Places in Need."

The suburbanization of poverty is one of the most important demographic trends of the last 50 years.
Poverty rates across the suburban landscape have increased by 50 percent since 1990.
The number of suburban residents living in high poverty areas has almost tripled in that time.

These new trends are not just occurring in the wake of the Great Recession. In 1990, there were nearly as many poor people in the suburbs of the largest 100 U.S. metropolitan areas as within the cities of those metros, even though poverty rates historically have been much higher in cities.

Why is poverty rising faster in suburbs than in cities? There are many reasons. Population growth in suburbs plays a part - the US has become a suburban nation. However, that's not the most important factor. My research finds that suburban poverty is growing three times faster than population size in suburban communities across the country.

As in cities and rural communities, poverty is rising in suburbs because of the changing nature of the labor market.
For those in low-skill jobs, earnings have stayed flat for the last 40 years.
In most suburbs, unemployment rates were twice as high in 2014 as in 1990. Good-paying jobs that don't require advanced training have started to disappear in suburbs, just as they did in central cities more than a quarter century ago.

These national employment trends have contributed to rising poverty everywhere, but the impact has been particularly acute in suburbs, where there are a large percentage of workers without advanced education or vocational training.

Rising suburban poverty has surprising implications for the safety net...
Suggestions..Finally, poverty problems continue to rise, albeit at slower rates, in cities and rural communities. Across geographic boundaries, the nation has a shared interest in the fight against poverty. If we cannot come together on this issue, we will not be successful in that fight in any one place - urban, rural or suburban...Continued..

READ MORE: http://www.businessinsider.com/poverty-is-rising-faster-in-us-suburbs-than-in-cities-heres-why-2018-6

Writer Scott W. Allard: https://evans.uw.edu/profile/allard



- Suburban poverty is growing at an alarming rate.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sun Jun 3, 2018, 02:51 PM

1. 'As in cities and rural communities, poverty is rising in suburbs because of the changing nature

of the labor market.

For those in low-skill jobs, earnings have stayed flat for the last 40 years.
In most suburbs, unemployment rates were twice as high in 2014 as in 1990. Good-paying jobs that don't require advanced training have started to disappear in suburbs, just as they did in central cities more than a quarter century ago.

These national employment trends have contributed to rising poverty everywhere, but the impact has been particularly acute in suburbs, where there are a large percentage of workers without advanced education or vocational training.'

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Response to elleng (Reply #1)

Sun Jun 3, 2018, 02:59 PM

2. It's been brought up some, but not stressed nearly enough. Why this appealed to me.

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #2)

Sun Jun 3, 2018, 03:07 PM

3. and it should be stressed more,

as among other things, helps explain trump.

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Response to elleng (Reply #3)

Sun Jun 3, 2018, 03:23 PM

4. Yes and a large part of major middle class decline & the American Dream era

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #4)

Sun Jun 3, 2018, 03:24 PM

5. Exactly, and many fail to recognize it,

and stick with race-matters as an excuse.

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Response to elleng (Reply #5)

Sun Jun 3, 2018, 03:49 PM

6. Exactly. Trump and his sycophants keep everyone divided with their white supremacy...

agenda so we're all at each others throats while they ruin the country even further and line their pockets.

Their agenda is all about Make America white again by demonizing immigrants, Muslims, and of course black people, brown people, gays and women.

We're sliding downhill fast with these racists in charge.

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Response to brush (Reply #6)

Sun Jun 3, 2018, 03:52 PM

8. and sadly it works here,

as well as 'outside.'

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #4)

Thu Jun 14, 2018, 08:26 AM

13. 'A Minimum-Wage Worker Can't Afford A 2-Bedroom Apartment Anywhere in the U.S.'

The economy’s booming. Some states have raised minimum wages. But even with recent wage growth for the lowest-paid workers, there is still nowhere in the country where someone working a full-time minimum wage job could afford to rent a modest two-bedroom apartment, according to an annual report released Wednesday by the National Low Income Housing Coalition.
Not even in Arkansas, the state with the cheapest housing in the country. One would need to earn $13.84 an hour — about $29,000 a year — to afford a two-bedroom apartment there. The minimum wage in Arkansas is $8.50 an hour.

Even the $15 living wage championed by Democrats would not make a dent in the vast majority of states. In Hawaii, the state with the most expensive housing, one would have to make $36.13 — about $75,000 a year — to afford a decent two-bedroom apartment...More, https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a-minimum-wage-worker-can%e2%80%99t-afford-a-2-bedroom-apartment-anywhere-in-the-us/ar-AAyAJxs

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sun Jun 3, 2018, 03:49 PM

7. The city of Atlanta and close-in communities are booming

The outer- and ex-burbs, on the other hand, not so much.

Georgia’s rural areas are experiencing another setback. Because the state hasn’t expanded Medicaid, rural hospitals continue to close at a staggering rate. At least six have closed. And of those remaining, half are at risk of closing over the next 10 years. The state is sacrificing its most vulnerable citizens on the altar of conservative orthodoxy.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sun Jun 3, 2018, 04:16 PM

9. Kicked and recommended.

Thanks for the thread appalachiablue

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Mon Jun 4, 2018, 02:56 PM

10. I would expect this thrend to continue too, being that a lot of the ...

infrastructure that brought about the suburbs was built outwards from the old cities back in the late '50s - through the 1960s and beyond, w/ the expansion of the interstate highway system under Pres. Eisenhower. Now, w/ this infrastructure crumbling, a lot of the suburbs are finding out just how expensive infrastructure is (it's not as cheap as bedroom communities as they are all finding out).

Welcome to the 'real world' suburbanites!

It's not all roses and butterflies, and fleeing the cities pretty well didn't do you any good.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Mon Jun 4, 2018, 03:29 PM

11. I could have told you that

back in the mid 1970s when I worked for a home health care organization. My job was to find financial help for people who could not afford our services. There was some stunning poverty in supposedly wealthy suburbs.

Later on, my teenaged children referred to two Western Chicago suburbs as Rolling Ghettoes and Hoffman mistakes. They were correct.

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Response to murielm99 (Reply #11)

Mon Jun 4, 2018, 03:51 PM

12. In the article, the author and the Pew research study focus on

a broad and deep growth of widespread poverty in suburban America.

"Poverty rates across the suburban landscape have increased by 50 percent since 1990."

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