HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Editorials & Other Articles (Forum) » ‘Til Death Do Us Part: In...

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 10:16 AM

‘Til Death Do Us Part: Inside the Pulitzer Prize-Winning Domestic Violence Exposé

(trigger warning)

(the full expose can be read at the second link)

‘Til Death Do Us Part: Inside the Pulitzer Prize-Winning Domestic Violence Exposé



This week, The Post and Courier, a family-owned and operated newspaper in Charleston, South Carolina, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize Public Service gold medal for their in-depth investigation into the devastation wrought by domestic violence in their state. In seven heart-wrenching installments, “‘Til Death Do Us Part“ explores the roles culture, patriarchy, law enforcement and legislation play in enabling domestic violence, as well offering commonsense strategies to combat it both statewide and nationally. The Ms. Blog spoke to Jennifer Berry Hawes, one of four journalists tasked with exposing the brutal reality of domestic violence in South Carolina, about shedding light on the suffering of so many at home.

Why this story now?

It started [in 2013] when the Violence Policy Center released its annual rankings for women who are killed by their domestic partners. It’s a ranking that comes out every year and South Carolina is always near the top so, for us, quite honestly, it wasn’t incredibly shocking that South Carolina was first. It’s one of those things where we’re somewhat used to covering, so originally, we kind of approached it as the usual daily story and then my colleagues got together and discussed taking a deeper look. It wasn’t just that we were ranked number one, but that our rate was twice that of the national average. There was obviously something going on here and we decided to take a deeper look at what that was.

How did you approach gathering the data and interview subjects?

[First], we divided up some of the work just by topic. Then, as a group, we decided to take a look at a list [compiled by] The Silent Witness National Initiative that details all of the people who have been killed by their domestic partners [each] year. We went through those lists of all the people who were killed and we tried to trace back details about the perpetrators’ offenses. We went back and looked at [their] other criminal domestic violence (CDV) convictions, other assault-type convictions… if they were repeat offenders. That proved to be really difficult and that’s when we really started to think this is one of the problems. In South Carolina, your first CDV offense is a maximum in jail of 30 days. There were abusers who had multiple first offenses so, there again is another obvious flaw in the system. If you get just a matter of weeks for beating your wife and then do it again and again just get a matter of weeks, what is your [deterrent]? Even if you have the moral recognition that what you’re doing is wrong, you’re not suffering any real punishment. That’s when we realized more than three hundred women had died [at the hands of abusive partners] in the past decade. [About] 1 every 12 days. So, we put a database together and then moved forward gathering more information about the victims themselves, pulled out some of the cases we wanted to really dive into and then we met with surviving victims who could share their stories. One thing that we found that I didn’t realize was that women are actually the most at risk of being killed [by abusive partners] when they do try to leave [and] that’s one reason why a lot of them stay.

Were you surprised by the prevalence and severity of domestic violence?

I have to say when I went in, I thought I had a pretty good grasp of it, [but I] was completely proven wrong. I had people come out of the woodwork. A neighbor of mine, the wife of one of my sons’ coaches [whose] mother had been a victim, there was a killing in my own neighborhood. You start to realize that it’s everywhere and how hush-hush it’s kept. I thought at the start of this that we may wind up focusing on a few key victims who have particularly disturbing stories to drive this, but I think what we found was there were so many. These were women who [felt] trapped in their relationships financially, but others were the breadwinners in their family. They were educated, they had the [financial] ability to leave and support themselves, but there’s so much more entwined in why they stayed. Whether it was because they believed nobody else would care about them ever or they thought, “if only my husband stops drinking, if only he stops doing drugs, if only he could control his temper, if only I’m a better wife, if only I don’t screw up dinner.” It was just so much more complicated than I expected.

. . . .

http://msmagazine.com/blog/2015/04/26/til-death-do-us-part-inside-the-pulitzer-prize-winning-domestic-violence-expose/


http://www.postandcourier.com/tilldeath/partone.html

https://www.vpc.org/ (the violence policy center)

http://www.silentwitness.net/ (the silent witness initiative--stories of domestic violence)

63 replies, 6268 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 63 replies Author Time Post
Reply ‘Til Death Do Us Part: Inside the Pulitzer Prize-Winning Domestic Violence Exposé (Original post)
niyad Apr 2015 OP
geek tragedy Apr 2015 #1
dixiegrrrrl Apr 2015 #2
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #3
brer cat Apr 2015 #6
HeiressofBickworth Apr 2015 #29
dixiegrrrrl Apr 2015 #41
HeiressofBickworth Apr 2015 #61
dixiegrrrrl Apr 2015 #62
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #4
niyad Apr 2015 #9
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #10
niyad Apr 2015 #11
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #12
niyad Apr 2015 #13
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #15
niyad Apr 2015 #19
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #26
niyad Apr 2015 #34
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #35
Skittles Apr 2015 #31
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #32
niyad Apr 2015 #37
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #39
niyad Apr 2015 #40
Skittles Apr 2015 #50
niyad Apr 2015 #54
dixiegrrrrl Apr 2015 #42
niyad Apr 2015 #44
Blue_Tires Apr 2015 #49
Jefferson23 Apr 2015 #5
brer cat Apr 2015 #7
niyad Apr 2015 #8
Solly Mack Apr 2015 #14
AuntPatsy Apr 2015 #16
niyad Apr 2015 #17
AuntPatsy Apr 2015 #25
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #36
AuntPatsy Apr 2015 #18
niyad Apr 2015 #21
CaliforniaPeggy Apr 2015 #20
trumad Apr 2015 #22
steve2470 Apr 2015 #23
FSogol Apr 2015 #24
Kali Apr 2015 #27
Heidi Apr 2015 #28
okaawhatever Apr 2015 #30
bemildred Apr 2015 #33
niyad Apr 2015 #38
riderinthestorm Apr 2015 #43
niyad Apr 2015 #45
riderinthestorm Apr 2015 #46
niyad Apr 2015 #47
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #48
niyad Apr 2015 #51
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #57
niyad Apr 2015 #58
BlancheSplanchnik Apr 2015 #60
AuntPatsy Apr 2015 #52
niyad Apr 2015 #56
AuntPatsy Apr 2015 #53
freepotter Apr 2015 #59
historylovr Apr 2015 #55
niyad Apr 2015 #63

Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 11:20 AM

1. damn

 

That’s when we realized more than three hundred women had died [at the hands of abusive partners] in the past decade. [About] 1 every 12 days.


Very interesting to see a local paper explicitly address the gender and religion dynamics that help drive the violence and oppression of women in SC.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 11:59 AM

2. "I didn’t realize that women are most at risk of being killed when they try to leave"

This steams me, and here is why:

In the 1970's, part of the Women's Right Movement included violence against women issues, battered women.
I was one of the founding Board Members of the first Shelter for Abused Woman in Seattle.

the issue spread across the country, and shelters got funding from state and Federal programs.
We educated police on how to handle domestic violence..that was a looong learning curve, btw.
Police started to remove the abuser and referring the victim to help on domestic violence calls.

Then the Republicans took over.
The funding was cut and cut and cut.

to the point where everything we learned about domestic violence seems to have been erased, and now we have a reporter who "did not realize" one of the key lessons we fought so long and hard to learn: domestic battery usually ends up with a dead victim, sooner or later.


It seems that everything my generation went thru in the 60's and 70's has been erased...environmental issues, regional wars, women's rights, unions.

I am feeling so weary and discouraged lately.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #2)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 02:55 PM

3. Sad Kick, Rec and ^ n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #2)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 06:12 PM

6. Truth.

I find it horribly depressing that we are fighting again the battles we thought we won decades ago. I would feel like quitting, but then I have granddaughters, so I have to keep going. sigh.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #2)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 11:55 PM

29. I wonder if you and I crossed paths back in the 70's

I was a paralegal at that time, specializing in divorces. The shelter was asking for help from paralegals to get temporary restraining orders for battered women, pro bono. At that time, paralegals were not allowed to present orders in court, not even temporary restraining orders which were not argued by opposing attorneys. Attorneys were to follow up at the TRO hearing in order to make them permanent. Without the cooperation of the courts and the bar association, there was little need for paralegals at the shelter. I took the shelter's training course and have always remembered what I learned.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HeiressofBickworth (Reply #29)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:34 AM

41. If you were in Seattle then, quite possibly.

I worked with NW Legal Service out of Snohomish County in area of Welfare Rights, also.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #41)

Wed Apr 29, 2015, 12:27 AM

61. Yes, it was a Seattle shelter

I lived (then and now) in Snohomish County but I worked on Queen Anne in Seattle. It would have been some time around 1973 -- that was the year that no-fault divorce became the law in Washington. I worked for a closed-panel law firm, one that was not open to the general public but was available to members of 26 unions that contracted with the firm for discounted services. We offered divorce, bankruptcies, adoptions, DUI, probates and estate planning with a few other civil cases as well. It isn't around any longer. I was a paralegal for divorce, bankruptcies and adoptions. It was my experience with divorce cases that gave me the interest in doing some legal work for the shelter.

Do you recall a plan to use paralegals for TRO's?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HeiressofBickworth (Reply #61)

Wed Apr 29, 2015, 04:31 AM

62. My recall is spotty, I'm afraid.

Quite irritatiing that we have to address this inequality crap all over again, tho.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 02:59 PM

4. gee. one would think that this would matter to people.

Pretty disappointing show of support.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #4)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 08:19 PM

9. come on, it is mostly just women we are talking about here. not like we are important

or anything.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #9)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 08:55 PM

10. we need some ASS KICKING around here.

Skittles, get over here.



Much as I'd like to throttle people into caring, that strategy probably would backfire, in one or more myriad ways.

But some ASS KICKING could prove to be helpful.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #10)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 08:57 PM

11. I knew there was a reason I hung on to my stilettos.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #11)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:01 PM

12. heh heh!

I chucked all my pervy stuff, but I DO have my massive hiking boots.



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #12)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:07 PM

13. those will probably work better.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #13)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:24 PM

15. well, I *just* put them to good use.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #15)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:28 PM

19. thank you so much for that!!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #19)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 10:08 PM

26. well, I did my best.

-_-

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #26)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:11 AM

34. it is clear that your best is very good indeed. thank you for the visibility.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #34)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:16 AM

35. oh, awesome!!!! when I went to bed, it looked as if it hadn't helped.

I'm glad to see it did!!!!!!

Your OP deserves to be seen. It's IMPORTANT

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #10)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 03:12 AM

31. maybe we need to start looting and burning to draw attention to the issue

that seems to be a meme

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Skittles (Reply #31)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 03:39 AM

32. I've always thought women would get taken more seriously if we acted out more.

We're too Nice.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #32)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:17 AM

37. I remember what happened to the suffragists. just think what the woman-hating

reichwingnuts would come up with now.

but, you are correct. we have been way too nice, way too patient. back in the early days of the current women's movement, we were told that we didn't have to protest, to demand, that the courts would protect us. I would laugh, except that it isn't remotely funny.

"For the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house. They may allow us temporarily to beat him at his own game, but they will never enable us to bring about genuine change. And this fact is only threatening to those women who still define the master's house as their only source of support."--audre lord

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #37)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:24 AM

39. word. ^

Clearly no one else is going to fight for us. Even though we've always been on the front lines for other causes, we have to keep at this one ourselves.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #39)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:29 AM

40. I guess we have to keep waiting for our turn. that is what we were told during the

fight for women's suffrage around the time of the civil war, and every season since then for one cause or another.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #40)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 08:38 PM

50. we have never had a female president and we are OVER HALF THE POPLATION

the sexism in America is still rampant

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Skittles (Reply #50)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 08:54 PM

54. and we rank way down there in the world in terms of representation of women in

governmental power.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #37)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:41 AM

42. I remember the Women's movement of the 70's..

It drastically changed my life for the better.
And we we were not sitting at home...there were marches. We were loud. We were active.

Apparently loud and active is much needed right now, to counter the current Reich Wing attempts to drag everyone back to the days of serfdom.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #42)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:47 AM

44. agreed. but even being loud and active doesn't help if nobody knows we are being

loud and active. how much coverage in the msm have any of our marches, etc. gotten?

remember this:


Flashback: Over One Million March for Women’s Lives
Posted 04/25/2014 by National Organization for Women & filed under Abortion Rights/Reproductive Issues.
Share on twitter Share on facebook Share on google_plusone_share Share on tumblr More Sharing Services

The following is an article from the Spring 2004 National NOW Times, written by former Communications Director Lisa Bennett.
March for Women's Lives, 2004

A small portion of the crowd, marching through Washington, D.C.

In the weeks leading up to the March for Women’s Lives, organizers knew the event would be one of the largest of its kind ever in Washington, D.C. Marchers were coming by car, bus, train and plane from all over the United States and even the world. But no one could predict exactly what heights the attendance would reach.

On April 25, 2004, a year of planning paid off when 1.15 million women, men, girls and boys marched to protect and advance abortion rights, birth control and access to a full range of reproductive health care options.

Marchers began gathering shortly after sunrise at the National Mall, between the U.S. Capitol and the Washington Monument. By 10 am, when speakers and performers took the morning stage, a sea of activists were pouring from the metro stations into the heart of the nation’s capital. A photo taken from atop the Monument shows an amazing mile-long column of people clad in purple and pink t-shirts and waving a collage of signs. “You look beautiful,” NOW President Kim Gandy told the crowd.

The March itself took hours to complete with so many people participating. The route took reproductive rights supporters past the White House and down Pennsylvania Avenue toward the Capitol building. Back on the Mall again, more speeches and entertainment rounded out an incredible day.

. . . .

http://now.org/blog/over-one-million-march-for-womens-lives/

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #4)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 02:35 PM

49. +1

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 04:59 PM

5. Powerful. K&R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 06:14 PM

7. ...

Remember My Story.
Remember My Name.

Yes, we must.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 08:18 PM

8. . . .

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:24 PM

14. K&R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:27 PM

16. I never saw it... I'm well aware of its effect ...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to AuntPatsy (Reply #16)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:28 PM

17. sadly, all too many are.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #17)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:42 PM

25. Very true...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #17)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:16 AM

36. yep. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:28 PM

18. 233 views and 16 recommends....now that says alot

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to AuntPatsy (Reply #18)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:29 PM

21. doesn't it just.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:29 PM

20. K&R for this important and vital topic. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Reply #20)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:32 PM

22. Kick

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:35 PM

23. kick and rec! nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 09:38 PM

24. K&R. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 10:43 PM

27. the only bill that got passed was for protection of the pets left in the hands of abusers

jesusfuckingchrist

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 11:28 PM

28. Kick, kick, kick!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 11:56 PM

30. K & R nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 06:31 AM

33. KnR.

Passed down from generation to generation.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:18 AM

38. . . .

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:45 AM

43. I'm only on the fourth part but can't hold back recommending this

 

Usually I wait until I'm finished with the entire article before I comment or recommend but this one is a MUST read, especially for anyone who claims to care about women's issues.

Thanks for posting niyad.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to riderinthestorm (Reply #43)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:48 AM

45. you are most welcome.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #45)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:54 AM

46. I started reading it yesterday and it's obvious why it won the Pulitzer

 

the depth and scope of the writing and analysis is excellent.

Are you a South Carolina resident?

I can't believe I missed this article before. I've now shared it at least ten times even without finishing it. Shared at such diverse places as the local women's shelter I volunteer at - to the local food pantry, and especially with my two daughters.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to riderinthestorm (Reply #46)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 11:03 AM

47. not an SC resident, just a woman working in this field for many, many years.

thank you for sharing, and continuing to share this valuable information.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 12:40 PM

48. kick. where are our allies? shouldn't there be more people around here who care

About the status of women?

Why the hell is our Life or Death such a low priority?

Systematized bias that ends up with a lot of women DEAD, yet that commands so little attention?

We hear about all the other human rights violations, and pizza parlors denying service to gay weddings get top priority for weeks, but institutionalized neglect of women, which helps KILL US..... ??

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #48)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 08:42 PM

51. I know you have noticed how little response women's issues get, everywhere, even on

progressive boards and sites. we simply do not count.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #51)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 09:07 PM

57. well, to be fair, we do get tons of loyal allies

When the issue is a "top-free" protest. Then we matter a big whole lot.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #57)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 09:10 PM

58. must have missed those.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Reply #58)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 10:42 PM

60. you didn't miss much

Just a lot of jackassery.... The "Femen" brouhaha.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #48)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 08:44 PM

52. 737 views - 41 recs.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to AuntPatsy (Reply #52)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 09:04 PM

56. it is a depressing commentary on just how unimportant women's lives are, even on a

progressive board.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #48)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 08:45 PM

53. Because those that believe it's so easy to walk away

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #48)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 09:55 PM

59. K & R

nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Tue Apr 28, 2015, 08:58 PM

55. K & R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to niyad (Original post)

Wed Apr 29, 2015, 10:22 AM

63. . . .

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread