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Wed Jan 25, 2023, 08:08 AM

White House unveils new tenant protections amid soaring rental costs

Last edited Wed Jan 25, 2023, 12:55 PM - Edit history (1)

Source: Washington Post

Under pressure to address the nation’s soaring housing costs, the Biden administration on Wednesday announced significant new actions to protect tenants and make renting more affordable.

The announcement involves multiple federal agencies that will gather information on unfair housing practices. It also includes a “Blueprint for a Renters Bill of Rights” that, while not binding, sets clear guidelines to help renters stay in affordable housing. The White House is also launching a call to action, dubbed the “Resident-Centered Housing Challenge,” that aims to get housing providers as well as state and local governments to strengthen policies in their own markets.

After months of deliberation, the moves come as the housing market continues to pose a serious problem for people who don’t own their homes — and for the economy overall. While inflation has fallen for the past six months, average rental prices have continued to increase rapidly, disproportionately hurting vulnerable households that spend the bulk of their budgets on rent. Meanwhile, the country is stuck in a massive housing shortfall, complicating efforts to lower costs or simply find enough places for the 44 million American renter households to go.

“This is something the president identified as being necessary on the campaign trail, and is not necessarily purely a product of the current surge in rents, because this is much more expansive than thinking about this in the context of rent growth,” said Erika Poethig, special assistant to the president for housing and urban policy at the Domestic Policy Council, in an interview with The Washington Post. “It’s about thinking about many other aspects of what contributes to a fair market.”

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2023/01/25/white-house-renter-protection/



No paywall

Here is the WH Fact Sheet - https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2023/01/25/fact-sheet-biden-harris-administration-announces-new-actions-to-protect-renters-and-promote-rental-affordability/

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Reply White House unveils new tenant protections amid soaring rental costs (Original post)
BumRushDaShow Wednesday OP
Luciferous Wednesday #1
Major Nikon Wednesday #2
Luciferous Wednesday #3
BumRushDaShow Wednesday #4
Puppyjive Wednesday #5
The Jungle 1 Wednesday #6
Puppyjive Wednesday #7
BumRushDaShow Wednesday #8
The Jungle 1 Wednesday #18
BumRushDaShow Wednesday #19
Magoo48 Wednesday #9
Magoo48 Wednesday #10
Abigail_Adams Wednesday #11
Puppyjive Wednesday #12
MichMan Wednesday #16
KPN Wednesday #17
Sgent 22 hrs ago #23
kelly1mm Wednesday #13
BumRushDaShow Wednesday #14
MichMan Wednesday #15
LetMyPeopleVote Wednesday #20
Igel Wednesday #21
BumRushDaShow Wednesday #22

Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 08:16 AM

1. Gathering information and creating

non-binding guidelines aren't really tenant protections. Per the article it sounds like they are relying on state and local governments to come up with new policies and enforce them which isn't likely in a lot of places.

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Response to Luciferous (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 08:35 AM

2. It already is a state and local government issue

There's not much the executive branch can do which would be binding. The best they can do is leverage federal housing assistance programs.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 08:41 AM

3. Precisely, so the title of the article is kind

of misleading.

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Response to Luciferous (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 08:47 AM

4. Remember that the Executive Branch cannot "make law"

Congress has to do that (at the federal level).

I.e., the administration cannot magically or legally institute "rent control", so they are left with attempting to work within the existing laws to address shortcomings and fill gaps without having their attempts taken to court by the loons, and thrown out (which happens often). Most of the federal law dealing with tenant rights have to do with equal housing access and discrimination, as well as operations associated with federally assisted dwellings. Much of the rest is handled by the states, their counties, and municipalities.

See this - https://www.hud.gov/groups/tenants

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 08:48 AM

5. Housing is the biggest threat

Housing costs prevent any kind of mobility in this country. People are not able to move for employment and this is extremely bad for employers trying to fill positions. It's a snowball affect. I have noticed that people in the real estate business are glowing in their wealth. It makes me sick to my stomach what we have done to our future generations. They cannot thrive in this current real estate market. They are depressed. They are stuck. They are broke. Sometimes, I really don't like this country I live in. Change is needed badly.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 09:11 AM

6. I think we need to tread lightly here.

Things like how it is extremely difficult to evict a hoarder for being a hoarder. The person is living in you property destroying it but you will have considerable issues evicting them. The last unit I had to redo was beyond all that is sane. My first pass on the stove top was with a putty knife. The refrigerator was full of rotten food and flies. The filth was unbelievable.
I am a liberal Democrat. However when a sick person is destroying your property I need better laws. Either the government intervenes in the sick persons life or I am allowed to evict quickly. This time we were at the end of a one year lease. I warned him and got more security and went to a month to month lease. I gave him a few months and told him I was ending the contract. I gave him two months to move. He waited until the last week to do anything.
I have decided I will only sign 6 month leases and require inspections. I will inform the tenants that if they are destroying my property I will not renew the contract. One year is to long. I have rented property for many years the majority of people are good folks.

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Response to The Jungle 1 (Reply #6)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 09:23 AM

7. I get it

There are bad apples out there and I genuinely feel bad you. My parents owned apartments and it was a lot of work for them. They maintained their property very well and occasionally had bad renters. What they didn't do is make their apartments unaffordable. I think when people are forced to spend most of their earnings on rent and have literally no money left for essentials, a problem begins to brew. Doubling one's rent because you can is awful and should be considered price gouging. People start to lose respect for the landlord who threatens their very survival.

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Response to The Jungle 1 (Reply #6)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 09:35 AM

8. This is not really focused on "evictions"

but on price controls and a lack of affordable housing stock that in turn encourages high rental prices due to the low supply. The article admits the limitations that the Executive Branch has with anything to do with pricing (other than subsidies as denoted per law) and acknowledges that it is a Congressional problem. It even notes way at the bottom, that BBB had solutions in it for Housing but those were stripped from what was eventually passed.

And given the GOP loons in Congress, activists and progressive members of Congress are pushing the administration to do a hail Mary set of options to see what makes it to the end zone without a deflection.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Reply #8)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 12:48 PM

18. Well just so I do not come off as a money hungry republican

This is a nice one bedroom unit. The paint is good the floors are good. Everything works.
I was only getting 750 a month. Although it is in the northeast and the heat is on the tenant.
Thank you for your information.
I have only ever had to evict one person and that was due to drugs. I explain to people that eviction records are the first thing property owners check and you are way better off leaving.
When you get good long term tenant it is a nice business.

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Response to The Jungle 1 (Reply #18)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 02:04 PM

19. I don't think the issues are so much with the individual single-family landlords

but often with the large corporate multi-family apartment owners who have swooped into many municipalities and bought up multiple complexes. They end up doing some rudimentary "curb appeal" (landscaping) fixes and then sell to the next corporate buyer at a profit, raising the rents in the process.

I know one of the apartment buildings that I had lived in for years before moving to where I am now, was literally changing hands every 3 - 4 years. Each of these new owners brought in their own contracted property management staff who were hit or miss with respect to customer service. And as things devolved (heating systems went, roofs needed repair, plumbing was subpar), the owners sell, and away that team goes to be replaced by a new group.

So there are many types of practices that could use some regulation/tweaking to stabilize the marketplace and reduce the churn that basically boils down to the continual "flipping of apartment properties" (just like you see people flipping homes).

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 10:19 AM

9. Make it illegal to buy and/or hoard residential properties.

Banks, hedge funds, and other vulture capitalists must be separated and restrained from peoples living spaces.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 10:19 AM

10. Make it illegal to buy and/or hoard residential properties.

Banks, hedge funds, and other vulture capitalists must be separated and restrained from peoples living spaces.

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Response to Magoo48 (Reply #10)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 10:29 AM

11. Yes, a lot of this

is happening around Boston and elsewhere. Boston is trying to pass a limit on rent increases to 10% each lease renewal. I hope that sticks. There are other factors, of course, but owner greed drives most of the big hikes. Cities need to bring back some form of modified rent control, as in limiting the size of hikes or requiring particular improvements to the units to justify the rent increases. No more using a building purchased once as a cash cow forever with no improvements.

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Response to Abigail_Adams (Reply #11)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 10:37 AM

12. Yes!

I agree whole heartedly!

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Response to Abigail_Adams (Reply #11)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 12:03 PM

16. Tax sellers 30% when they sell to these types of buyers

Sellers shouldn't get huge profits just because they occupied the space for a few years. It would be categorized as a windfall profits tax.

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Response to Abigail_Adams (Reply #11)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 12:31 PM

17. It's happening in a lot of -- if not nearly every -- place. Definitely happening here in Oregon

including the larger rural communities.

The greed is astounding. A rental real estate owner I personally know told me he had to raise rents. I asked him why? His response: everybody else was. I was dumbfounded. Sheer profiteering on the backs of struggling workers.

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Response to Magoo48 (Reply #10)

Thu Jan 26, 2023, 07:02 AM

23. Only individual states could do this

Congress could probably cram some restrictions using those who raise funds (financing) across state lines, but otherwise is likely limited. In commercial real estate (including commercial residential) banks often aren't big players compared to private investors or bonds.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 11:47 AM

13. I read the article (twice) and see no new tenant protections. I see studies and

reports and acknowledgement that the federal government has very limited options in what is and will continue to be a state/local issue.

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Response to kelly1mm (Reply #13)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 11:50 AM

14. This was because "demands" were made of the administration

to "do something" - and especially after Congress had the Housing issues stripped from what became of the BBB.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 12:02 PM

15. The states could help by waiving all property taxes on residential rental properties

Any relief would have to be passed on to reduced rents.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 02:37 PM

20. K&R

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 07:05 PM

21. Of course "average rental prices" have continued to increase.

They're average.

If there's a 9% increase in the last 11 months, a 1-year lease doesn't reflect that in its last payment.

We focused on *new* lease costs for a while--because monthly rates rose with inflation (or perhaps more than inflation) and new rates increased month by month. As inflation levels out, it's *inevitable* that the average monthly rate will increase even as the inflation rate levels out. The average includes rates from 2/22 and from 1/23. In February, from 3/22 and 2/23.

It's the same with salaries. My contract's signed in May and pay rates set in April. Any inflation after 3/22 is *not* included in my contract. I expect that to be rectified in 4 months, but that'll mean my pay increase > inflation for the last month. It takes a while for the pig to pass through the python.

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Response to Igel (Reply #21)

Wed Jan 25, 2023, 07:17 PM

22. "It takes a while for the pig to pass through the python."

Now that invoked a wild image!

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