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Thu Aug 4, 2022, 03:22 PM

U.S. declares monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency

Source: CBS News

The Biden administration is declaring a public health emergency for the monkeypox outbreak in the United States, which now counts more infections from the virus than any other country in the world. Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra announced the decision at a briefing with top public health officials Thursday.

"This public health emergency will allow us to explore additional strategies to get vaccines and treatments more quickly out to the impacted communities. And it will allow us to get more data from jurisdictions so we can effectively track and attack this outbreak," Robert Fenton, the newly appointed White House national monkeypox response coordinator, said at the briefing.

Over the last decade, nationwide emergency declarations like this have previously been made only for the COVID-19 pandemic, the opioid crisis, and the Zika virus outbreak in 2017. As it did for COVID-19, the move by Becerra to declare an emergency could unlock a broad swath of flexibilities in funding and regulations to respond to the spread of monkeypox.

A related determination would open the door for the Food and Drug Administration to grant emergency use authorizations that could ease access to treatments and vaccines for the monkeypox outbreak. The Biden administration is declaring a public health emergency for the monkeypox outbreak in the United States, which now counts more infections from the virus than any other country in the world. Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra announced the decision at a briefing with top public health officials Thursday.



Read more: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/monkeypox-outbreak-public-health-emergency-declared/

26 replies, 1360 views

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Arrow 26 replies Author Time Post
Reply U.S. declares monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency (Original post)
BumRushDaShow Thursday OP
SheltieLover Thursday #1
sdfernando Thursday #2
William769 Thursday #3
Warpy Thursday #4
imavoter Thursday #8
Warpy Thursday #10
Skittles Saturday #25
bill Thursday #5
BumRushDaShow Thursday #6
NickB79 Thursday #9
imavoter Thursday #7
BumRushDaShow Thursday #11
imavoter Thursday #13
BumRushDaShow Friday #15
womanofthehills Thursday #12
keithbvadu2 Friday #14
area51 Saturday #23
msfiddlestix Friday #16
BumRushDaShow Friday #17
AntiFascist Friday #18
msfiddlestix Friday #19
msfiddlestix Friday #20
BumRushDaShow Saturday #21
msfiddlestix Saturday #22
BumRushDaShow Saturday #24
msfiddlestix Sunday #26

Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 03:27 PM

1. Here we go again.

Glad Joe is on it!

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 03:30 PM

2. ...and its a HOAX...in....5...4...3...2...1

Really do I need this?

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 03:58 PM

3. Hey hey



to soon?



On a more serious note, I am very happy that the Biden Administration has declared a public health emergency. A group of very special people seems to be hit harder than the general population.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 04:09 PM

4. So far, it's not that easy to catch

but viruses have a nasty way of mutating to overcome that. Virologists date the first case of person to person transmission to 2017. That means the cases in Africa before then were from infected animals, mostly bats, which is why they were so rare.

It's not going to be rare any more.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #4)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 06:13 PM

8. It actually can spread through respatory action

and can stay on surfaces for weeks.

We should be able to walk and chew gum,
and handle both issues.

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Response to imavoter (Reply #8)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 06:37 PM

10. Respiratory spread requires very close contact

Where did you get your information about its living on surfaces?

Other pox viruses are extremely fragile.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 05:41 PM

5. ...but Covid deaths....

are still at nearly 500/day in the US. Do we really need a boogeyman virus that is less transmissible then HIV? Or are the MEDIA trying to foment fear?

-bill
D24095

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Response to bill (Reply #5)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 05:56 PM

6. I think they did this because W.H.O. declared it

a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 7/23/22, and you have several states that have so far been disproportionately impacted, declaring their own health emergencies.

Technically with these declarations, it actually triggers access to various resources including funding to deal with it.

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Response to bill (Reply #5)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 06:32 PM

9. Less transmissible than HIV?

It can be spread by surface contact, like on clothing. Also via respiratory droplets.

GTFO with this "less transmissible" BS.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 06:09 PM

7. I want a vaccine for the masses like Covid

Let's just get ahead of it now.

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Response to imavoter (Reply #7)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 09:07 PM

11. The vaccine being used is a smallpox vaccine

and there really wasn't much thought about need since they "proclaimed" smallpox was "eradicated". But now here we are with this "pox" (where the smallpox vaccine has been effective for it).

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Reply #11)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 11:57 PM

13. Yes, but I guess I meant there's not enough to go around.

Let's get going, so everyone can get a dose.

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Response to imavoter (Reply #13)

Fri Aug 5, 2022, 05:18 AM

15. Again because smallpox was declared "eradicated"

and a virus like monkeypox never did this kind of spreading before (there have only been just a handful of cases here in the U.S. over the decades - mostly contracted from owners of exotic pets), then there was no need to have massive quantities of it.

After 9/11 and just weeks later, the anthrax mailings, the National Stockpile got a look and some stores of vaccines were reviewed and expanded - particularly something like smallpox, after a concern of bioterrorism. Congress passed -

H.R.3448 - Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 which included in summary -

Requires: (1) developing and maintaining medical countermeasures (such as drugs, vaccines and other biological products, medical devices, and other supplies) against biological agents and toxins that may be involved in such emergencies; (2) ensuring coordination and minimizing duplication of Federal, State, and local planning, preparedness, and response activities, including during the investigation of a suspicious disease outbreak or other potential public health emergency; and (3) enhancing the readiness of hospitals and other health care facilities to respond effectively to such emergencies.


and from the text -

(b) Smallpox Vaccine Development.--

(1) In general.--The Secretary shall

award contracts, enter into cooperative agreements, or carry out
such other activities as may reasonably be required in order to
ensure that the stockpile under subsection (a) includes an
amount of vaccine against smallpox as determined by the
Secretary to be sufficient to meet the health security needs of
the United States.

(2) Rule of construction.--Nothing in this section shall be

construed to limit the private distribution, purchase, or sale
of vaccines from sources other than the stockpile described in
subsection (a).


(snip)

(1) Strategic national stockpile.--For the purpose of

carrying out subsection (a), there are authorized to be
appropriated $640,000,000 for fiscal year 2002, and such sums as
may be necessary for each of fiscal years 2003 through 2006.

(2) Smallpox vaccine development.--For the purpose of

carrying out subsection (b), there are authorized to be
appropriated $509,000,000 for fiscal year 2002, and such sums as
may be necessary for each of fiscal years 2003 through 2006.


But what the media is NOT telling people is that the "stores" of the main smallpox vaccine, which are kept freeze-dried, are "purchased" and then "held in reserve" (set aside) by the manufacturer overseas (via a contract), and is NOT here. And once it is needed, a contract option is executed and the manufacturer then pulls out bulk vaccine, and fills 10-dose vials for shipment. Once a provider receives it and reconstitutes it, IIRC, it has a short expiration so it needs to be used right away or you'll eventually have dose waste. This requires the recipient provider to have 10 people ready to go the day the vaccine is reconstituted, which I imagine can be an issue.

The distribution of the various COVID-19 vaccines exposed the issues with state and county handling, where they demanded it, but then had their own problems getting it further distributed because there was no good way to track it, and systems that might be used to track them, had to be updated (normally by some contractor) to add the new codes. The same would probably happen with this.

I expect that the few who might have local stores of it are probably in DOD (they might even have their own contracts) as they usually line up soldiers to get a series of vaccines for wherever they plan to be deployed.

I know I have posted in threads before that what is sad is that little or NONE of this type of "real-time" exposure to the vaccine process, has ever hit the public in the way it has with COVID-19 and now this.

Vaccines were always considered a "loss leader" for pharmaceutical companies and the federal government has often had to beg them to please please be willing to make them.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Aug 4, 2022, 10:45 PM

12. Adults with smallpox vaccine may have immunity from monkeypox

Adults like yourself who received the smallpox vaccine during the nationwide program that was in effect from the late 1940s until 1972 are believed to have continuing immunity. This includes members of the U.S. military, who continued to receive smallpox vaccinations until 1991.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that, based on past data collected in Africa, the smallpox vaccine is at least 85% effective in preventing monkeypox. However, since this situation is so new, the precise degree of protection is not known. Researchers say that while older adults who have been vaccinated against smallpox may be susceptible to monkeypox infection, they are likely to experience only mild symptoms. The data show that the majority of healthy adults who become infected do not become severely ill. And to your question about smallpox boosters, no, they are not available.
https://connect.uclahealth.org/2022/07/25/adults-with-smallpox-vaccine-may-have-immunity-from-monkeypox/

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Aug 5, 2022, 12:23 AM

14. Blame Benjamin Ryan

Blame Benjamin Ryan


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Response to keithbvadu2 (Reply #14)

Sat Aug 6, 2022, 08:27 AM

23. lol, this tweet always makes me laugh.


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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Aug 5, 2022, 12:30 PM

16. I haven't researced this virus. I've been relying on reports from friends and neighbors and applying

what is generally known about viral contagious behavior, and transmittability. In this virus, I understood the virus survives on surfaces and objects like cold virus does, but for long period of time.

this is the first time I'm reading sexual transmission is a factor.

But would it be sexual? Or wouldn't it be more to the point, and put simply as Close Contact.

Sexual contact requires close contact. But close contact does not require sexual interaction.

In my view adding sex to this seems to invoke an "aides" level of scare, so only people who are sexually active should ve concerned or judicious.

In my view, this is an unnecessary tacti and subject to further confusion, possibly complacency.

Or is my logic flawed/skewed?

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Response to msfiddlestix (Reply #16)

Fri Aug 5, 2022, 01:19 PM

17. This thing seems to be some kind of mutated/variant form

because previously, the primary transmission was from certain infected animals like bats or exotic pets like ferrets or squirrels, to humans. It was not really known to have such human-to-human transmission like we are seeing.

For example, based on an outbreak in the MW almost 20 years ago (2003), CDC reported this in part -

Update: Multistate Outbreak of Monkeypox --- Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin, 2003

CDC and state and local health departments continue to investigate cases of monkeypox among persons in the United States who had contact with wild or exotic mammalian pets or with persons with monkeypox (1--4). This report updates results of the epidemiologic investigation, provides information on the use of smallpox vaccine during the outbreak, and summarizes the animal tracing activities to identify the origin and subsequent distribution of infected animals.
Epidemiologic Investigation

As of July 8, 2003, a total of 71 cases of monkeypox have been reported to CDC from Wisconsin (39), Indiana (16), Illinois (12), Missouri (two), Kansas (one), and Ohio (one); these include 35 (49%) cases laboratory-confirmed at CDC and 36 (51%) suspect and probable cases under investigation by state and local health departments (Figure 1). Eleven cases were excluded from those reported previously because they met the exclusion criteria outlined in the updated national case definition, and one new case was added (1). The number of cases increased from May 15 through the week ending June 8 and declined subsequently; the date of onset for the last case was June 20. Of the 71 cases, 39 (55%) occurred among females; the median age was 28 years (range: 1--51 years). Age data were unavailable for one patient. Among 69 patients for whom data were available, 18 (26%) were hospitalized; some patients were hospitalized for isolation precautions only. Two patients, both children, had serious clinical illness (1--4); both of these patients have recovered. The majority of patients were exposed to prairie dogs. Some patients were exposed in premises where prairie dogs were kept, and others were exposed to persons with monkeypox. No patients have been confirmed to have had exposure to persons with monkeypox as their only possible exposure.

Of the 35 laboratory-confirmed cases, 32 (91%) tested positive for monkeypox by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), culture, immunohistochemical testing (IHC), and/or electron microscopy in skin rash lesions; two tested positive by PCR and/or culture of an oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal swab; and one tested positive by PCR and culture of a lymph node aspirate. For laboratory-confirmed cases, onset of illness ranged from May 16 to June 20. The majority of patients reported a clinical illness that included rash (one patient had a single, atypical plaque-like skin lesion) and fever (Table 1). The median incubation period* was 12 days (range: 1--31 days).

(snip)

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5227a5.htm


Here is a very recent article about that 2003 incidences -

Concern grows that human monkeypox outbreak will establish virus in animals outside Africa
New viral reservoirs could make outbreaks common and spawn fresh variants

8 Jun 2022 2:45 PM By Jon Cohen



Eleven days after being bitten by one of her pet prairie dogs, a 3-year-old girl in Wisconsin on 24 May 2003 became the first person outside of Africa to be diagnosed with monkeypox. Two months later, her parents and 69 other people in the United States had suspected or confirmed cases of this disease, which is caused by a relative of the much deadlier smallpox virus. The monkeypox virus is endemic in parts of Africa, and rodents imported from Ghana had apparently infected captive prairie dogs, North American animals, when an animal distributor in Texas housed them together.

The outbreak now underway has affected more people outside of Africa than ever before—nearly 1300 cases as of 7 June, on multiple continents, many of them men who have sex with men. But like the 2003 episode, today’s surge has raised a possibility that makes researchers gulp: Monkeypox virus could take up permanent residence in wildlife outside of Africa, forming a reservoir that could lead to repeated human outbreaks.

No animal reservoir currently exists outside of Africa, but the U.S. outbreak of 2003 was a close call, some scientists suspect, especially because nearly 300 of the animals from Ghana and the exposed prairie dogs were never found. “We narrowly escaped having monkeypox establish itself in a wild animal population” in North America, suggests Anne Rimoin, an epidemiologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who long has studied the disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). In the end, however, surveys of wild animals in Wisconsin and Illinois never found monkeypox virus, none of the infected humans passed on the disease to other people, and worries about this exotic outbreak evaporated.

Will North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia—all of which have reported monkeypox cases in this outbreak—be similarly fortunate this time? Viruses frequently pingpong between humans and other species. Although COVID-19 is widely thought to have resulted from SARS-CoV-2 jumping from a bat or other host into people, humans have, in “reverse zoonoses,” also infected white-tailed deer, minks, cats, and dogs with the virus. One study in Ohio found antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 in more than one-third of 360 wild deer sampled. And in past centuries, when humans carried plague and yellow fever to new continents, those pathogens created reservoirs in rodents and monkeys, respectively—which later infected humans again.

(snip)

https://www.science.org/content/article/concern-grows-human-monkeypox-outbreak-will-establish-virus-animals-outside-africa


What happened in this current instance, is that there has been quite a bit of loaded wording in the initial reporting that basically claimed that this was "an African disease" and then "a gay disease" and it has gone downhill ever since.

There needs to be some serious looks at what is actually going on with it because it atypical because in the past, most spread was from animal to human and animal to animal, with little or no human-to-human transmission.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Reply #17)

Fri Aug 5, 2022, 03:29 PM

18. Maybe the public will take it seriously when young children begin spreading it at preschool n/t

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Reply #17)

Fri Aug 5, 2022, 05:36 PM

19. Interesting thank you... ,,,,

An unfortunate factor of pandemics is the result of unchecked global migration exacerbated by importing/smuggling of exotic wildlife.

Obviously, this is an oversimplification, but I feel it is safe to say there does exist the correlation in evidence established a few centuries ago. it is also a thing that contributes to xenophobia, fear of the other.....

This is where we are. I think it's going to get worse before it gets better. most unfortunately.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Aug 5, 2022, 11:46 PM

20. I just found out that it IS hitting the Gay community....

I don't follow day to day news on tv and so I missed reporting going on in the Castro District in San Francisco. Apparently the numbers are concentrated in that district. Here in Sonoma Co., a little over 60 miles north of SF, all reports to our county health dept are cases specifically from a little town along the Russian River called Guerneville which is an established Gay community here.

7 cases last week, 17 this morning, a week later. Sadly, this seems to be a virus spread mainly by sexual activity and interactions from male to male. Miserable and horrible disease, but apparently not lethal? It's what I read today, but I didn't read any further.







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Response to msfiddlestix (Reply #20)

Sat Aug 6, 2022, 06:26 AM

21. One of the concerns is that it may be (and probably is) hitting OTHER communities

but the individuals are either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic, or the symptoms are either being dismissed as having some other cause due to a lack of expertise of the medical community to recognize it (obviously because it is something that is extremely rare and the last time it bubbled up in the U.S. was almost 20 years ago associated with owners of exotic animals in the MW), and/or is not being tested for.

As it is, probably 90+% of doctors have never seen patient presentation of a "pox" outside of maybe chicken pox, let alone seen smallpox or monkeypox, outside of "pictures".

And since the gay community is often a tight, close-knit community that has set up extensive mechanisms for communications within the community, they have attempted to get the word out to make sure that people get tested and vaccinated- whether they are showing symptoms or not. But there needs to be some kind of contact tracing to lead outside of the community.

It is easily conceivable that any other close-knit communities, like church groups that engage in extensive physical contact (like "laying of the hands", "prayer circles", or "full dunk baptisms" ), could also contract it. But with this stigmatization that has now occurred, such reports of contracting it might easily be suppressed from reaching the media and outside health officals.

The earliest cases to happen in the UK were NOT members of the gay community (that only happened later).

It's the same type of phenomena that gets talked about with COVID-19 - i.e., there are probably far more cases out there than are being reported and tracked due to home-testing and little or no follow-up unless the person ends up in the hospital or is tested for it while being tested before some other medical procedure.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Reply #21)

Sat Aug 6, 2022, 08:11 AM

22. Excellent points

I'm involved in a music community which meet regularly to jam. Some of the jams involve singing, other jams are strictly instrumental. Each of our sessions involve very close proximity of each other for all the obvious reasons, Though when we first started up our sessions after restrictions relaxed and not playing together for two years, most of us have dropped the masks and the distancing.

Likewise, I'm involved in various activities with residents in my community who are all Seniors, we share meals together and gather for various other things including singing. It's how we maintain our mental health, and bring some measure of joy to our lives. Some of our Seniors deal with auto-immune issues, and I'm afraid we're about to go through another shut down with our clubhouse where we tend to gather.

Now with this Monkey Pox hovering over us we're trying to sort out how it might effect us directly and how it will impact our daily lives. Since we don't want the shutdown of our clubhouse again, we're trying to figure out if it's actually true that the virus lingers on surfaces for days and weeks at a time. Is it true that the virus can stay alive on clothing. What does that mean for our little laundry room, and how about the tables and chairs where we share our meals together. Etc etc etc. The reports of this virus mainly impacting the Gay community. there seems to generate a sense of relief it's not our community, so not to worry too much

All the uncertainty is difficult to sort out and deal with.. But we managed to get through Covid and it's not over.

Sigh....






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Response to msfiddlestix (Reply #22)

Sat Aug 6, 2022, 04:13 PM

24. Well I think in this case

vs COVID-19, the vector appears to be through viral shed from the actual blisters/pustules, which apparently can erupt on various parts of the body including in the mouth, and in that latter case, that is where large droplets could then be expelled when singing/shouting and perhaps even playing certain instruments like the brass or woodwind types.

From what I am starting to find as more articles discuss it, there are apparently cases with "mild" symptoms and that might be hiding any spread.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Reply #24)

Sun Aug 7, 2022, 08:43 AM

26. Yepperrs. That has me concerned...

I think at the very least we maintain distancing and maybe gather outside, while in the remaining summer months.

we'll really need to carry on mindful this hovering over us.

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