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Fri Mar 6, 2020, 12:34 AM

Alabama executes inmate Nathaniel Woods

Source: CNN

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey refused to stop the controversial execution, and the US Supreme Court denied a last-minute stay, after first ordering a temporary halt only minutes before Woods had been scheduled to die.

Woods was convicted in 2005 of capital murder, but there were questions about his culpability, his representation at trial, and his co-defendant, Kerry Spencer said Woods was innocent.

In a phone interview from William C. Holman Correctional Facility in Escambia County, Spencer told CNN that he alone fatally shot the three officers in 2004 when they stormed the crack house where he was sleeping. A fourth officer was shot but survived.

Read more: https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/05/us/alabama-nathaniel-woods-execution/index.html



Nathaniel Woods is black.

He is innocent. Another guy, Kerry Spencer CONFESSED, but Woods was executed anyway.

Here's Spencer's note:



Alabama is truly the butthole of the nation.

20 replies, 1987 views

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Arrow 20 replies Author Time Post
Reply Alabama executes inmate Nathaniel Woods (Original post)
PatrickforO Mar 2020 OP
iluvtennis Mar 2020 #1
PatrickforO Mar 2020 #2
Rainbow Droid Mar 2020 #7
PJMcK Mar 2020 #11
CaptYossarian Mar 2020 #14
SamKnause Mar 2020 #3
CaptYossarian Mar 2020 #15
Jake Stern Mar 2020 #4
groundloop Mar 2020 #5
Warpy Mar 2020 #6
Judi Lynn Mar 2020 #9
StevieM Mar 2020 #8
PoindexterOglethorpe Mar 2020 #10
PJMcK Mar 2020 #12
Coventina Mar 2020 #13
llashram Mar 2020 #16
Jake Stern Mar 2020 #17
PatrickforO Mar 2020 #18
Jake Stern Mar 2020 #19
PatrickforO Mar 2020 #20

Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 12:37 AM

1. Just shameful. Nathaniel Woods should still be on this earth.

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Response to iluvtennis (Reply #1)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 12:38 AM

2. Yeah, he should be free. For God's sake, what is wrong with these people?

If you KNOW someone is innocent and execute them anyway, what does that say about you?

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Response to PatrickforO (Reply #2)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 01:05 AM

7. The level of evil required to allow the execution of someone innocent is almost unimaginable.

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Response to PatrickforO (Reply #2)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 07:46 AM

11. These people

Consider who you're pointing your finger at:

The judge(s) who oversaw the trial and appeals.
The governor.
The Supreme Court who refused a stay.

Some country we've got.

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Response to PJMcK (Reply #11)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 10:21 AM

14. When I read that he was black, I thought of Casablanca.

"Round up the usual suspects."

In an overwhelming majority of American communities (north and south), pigmentation equals probable cause. Where I live, the local paper (birdcage flooring) prints traffic offenders each week. At least half of the names are Hispanic, when the population is 20-25% Hispanic--and only a smidge of other minorities.

They don't care about innocence or lack of physical evidence. It's estimated that between 4 and 7% of Death Row inmates are innocent. We just lost another one.

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Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 12:48 AM

3. Is this an example of a country that is concerned with justice ???

With Liberty and Justice For All is a lie !!!

Many things about this country are lies.

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Response to SamKnause (Reply #3)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 10:26 AM

15. Slave owners wrote Liberty and Justice for All.

And even women couldn't vote until 1920.

A century later, the president will once again be an old white guy.

America--the Land of Opportunity (insert laugh track for irony).

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Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 12:52 AM

4. How disgusting it is that anybody can see this case and still support the death penalty in any way

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Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 12:53 AM

5. Governor Ivey has his blood on her hands

She could have stopped this. Capital punishment needs to end, it's yet another major flaw in our government that state sanctioned murder is still allowed.

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Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 01:04 AM

6. Someone in my family was murdered when I was 16

It was a gruesome murder and the man who did it was suspected of other similar murders in town.

The cops plied him with coffee and cigarettes and he eventually admitted to it, his confession probably saving him from the DP. I was glad of that, having somebody kill him just would have made it feel even worse. He eventually died in prison. I still have the lurid "true crime" pulp magazine that detailed the murder, a grotesque souvenir of my childhood.

I have always been against the death penalty, humans are flawed creatures and we lack the wisdom to make that choice. As a nurse, I've also cared for a few people I'd like to see put into a cage with the door welded shut, they were that bad, but killing them should not be a possibility. We should be better than that, even if they're not.

This case was a bout a DA and a bunch of jurors who didn't want to admit they'd made a terrible mistake. That happens with a lot of people, and that's another reason the DP should end nationwide.

NM abolished the DP about 10 years ago, having had only one execution in the state since 1960 or so. It just want' worth it to keep it on the books. I hope we can keep it off the books. We are not wise enough to decide life or death for anyone. We make too many mistakes.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #6)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 02:39 AM

9. So sorry hearing your personal experience. Thank you for your excellent post. n/t

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Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 02:20 AM

8. This is a national disgrace. As is the fact that it has gotten very little coverage. (eom)

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Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 03:14 AM

10. It would be more correct to say

that the state of Alabama murdered Nathaniel Woods.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #10)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 07:47 AM

12. The Supreme Court didn't help (n/t)

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Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 09:58 AM

13. Another victim of the harmful DP.

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Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Fri Mar 6, 2020, 11:04 AM

16. not surprised

by this in the least. While Mr Woods may have been a drug user, he was not a murderer evidently. But it is Alabama and the trump era.

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Response to PatrickforO (Original post)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 01:35 PM

17. Wonder where all the "I don't pity this guy" and "Some people just need to be put down" posters are?

They normally show up in OPs regarding the death penalty.

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Response to Jake Stern (Reply #17)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 02:44 PM

18. Well, they're not here, because the note clearly shows the guy was innocent.

He should not have been executed no matter how you may feel about the death penalty, because there is serious doubt as to his guilt. They should have reviewed the case, but we have elected DAs and they all want to be TOUGH ON CRIME. So, even when it is obvious someone is innocent, they resist freeing them tooth and nail.

I hate that.

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Response to PatrickforO (Reply #18)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 04:58 PM

19. I am 100% opposed to the death penalty guilty or not

I am very uncomfortable to giving the state the power to take a life like that, no matter the state of guilt of the accused.

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Response to Jake Stern (Reply #19)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 06:31 PM

20. A lot of people feel as you do. I don't always object to the death penalty, but

lately, with all these cases of innocent people surfacing, it kind of casts doubt on the whole thing for me. Plus it bothers me no end, this disgusting attitude from prosecutors and judges - oh, the jury convicted them, so they are guilty no matter what new evidence arises - is unconscionable. If it becomes apparent someone is innocent, they should cut the red tape and release that person immediately. Not to do so is morally wrong.

But capitalism comes into it. These private for-profit prisons often have agreements in the communities where they locate that the justice system in the region will keep them at 80% or 90% capacity. This is a prime example of the profit motive not mixing with the public good. Because if you incarcerate someone, then your taxpayers become responsible for feeding, clothing, housing and taking medical care of the person. And that doesn't happen even in some of the local, state and federal prisons.

Problem is, about half of the people in the 'justice system' think the convicts are dirtbags and need to be punished for the rest of their lives, while the other half hold out hope for rehabilitation.

Lastly, I'll say this about myself: If I were convicted of a heinous crime that I actually committed - like some horrible thing, and it was worthy of the death penalty, I would rather have that than spend the rest of my life in a cage, which is horrible. A quick death seems much preferable (if I did it) than the alternative. And, if I'm to die I would like it to be in the most humane way possible - firing squad. Or guillotine. Lethal injection is horrible and cruel. Electrocution is horrible and cruel. Hanging is horrible and cruel.

Fast, no pain.

But, then, I may have a different view about death than you anyway. At 61 with health issues, my own feeling is that life is not always sacred - it is the quality of life that is sacred. Consider people in hospice. Some, who have family, are OK. But those who are alone and get one visit a week live in hell. In Colorado we have a law, thank God, that if you are terminally ill, you can opt to have your life ended legally. Not sure how that works, but the doctor has to sign off. And I think the person has to pull the trigger. Which is cool.

I mean, I think about my nineteen year old cat. I loved that cat. But his kidneys were failing, he had a heart murmur, and his arthritis got so bad one day he couldn't move his hind legs. We had one of those vets who come to your home put him down.

By contrast, my mother got severe COPD. We had a couple emergencies, then the doctor told us that lack of oxygen had permanently damaged her brain and she couldn't take care of herself. He diagnosed 'hospice.' Now, I had visions of a nice place with a little room, brightly lit and airy, with nice people who would take care of her until the end...

LOL. That costs $6 large a month. Nope. We had HOME HOSPICE, where we had to move her into our home and set her up in our dining room on a hospital bed. She suffered for months. Months. She never wanted to be a burden. She told me, "The sooner I die, the better," but she lived. We got one of those crib monitors, and I can remember eyes meeting with my ex as we listened to her labored breathing.

Later, after it was over, we talked and found that each of us had thought of going quietly down and turning off her oxygen, but neither of us did. Just didn't have the heart.

So who was better off? My cat or my mother? This is why I roll my eyes when someone in the medical community expresses idealistic pro-life sentiments to me. Bottom line, life is hard, and then when our time comes we die. Who is to say what happens then? And who can say if we don't come later for another time around the wheel?

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