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Tue Jan 21, 2020, 01:31 PM

First US case of Wuhan coronavirus confirmed by CDC

Last edited Tue Jan 21, 2020, 04:23 PM - Edit history (1)

Source: cnn

(CNN)The United States has its first confirmed case of a new virus that appeared in Wuhan, China, last month, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Tuesday. The coronavirus has already sickened hundreds and killed six people in Asia.

CDC officials said the United States will be more strict about health screenings of airplane passengers arriving from Wuhan.

The patient, who is not being named, is in isolation at Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, Washington. He is in his 30s and lives in Snohomish County, Washington, just north of Seattle.

He arrived at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on January 15, before any health screenings for the Wuhan coronavirus began at US airports. He sought medical care on January 19. The CDC and Washington state are now tracing the people he was in contact with to see if he might have spread the disease to someone else.

Read more: https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/21/health/wuhan-coronavirus-first-us-case-cdc-bn/index.html



Shit...

21 replies, 1998 views

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Arrow 21 replies Author Time Post
Reply First US case of Wuhan coronavirus confirmed by CDC (Original post)
Dennis Donovan Jan 21 OP
Quackers Jan 21 #1
dewsgirl Jan 21 #2
Ilsa Jan 21 #3
Quackers Jan 21 #4
still_one Jan 21 #7
matt819 Jan 21 #5
cstanleytech Jan 21 #8
Turbineguy Jan 22 #21
Quackers Jan 21 #11
angrychair Jan 21 #12
Warpy Jan 21 #16
Ghost Dog Jan 21 #18
LonePirate Jan 21 #6
Pacifist Patriot Jan 21 #10
Massacure Jan 21 #19
Pacifist Patriot Jan 22 #20
Dopers_Greed Jan 21 #9
Dennis Donovan Jan 21 #13
muriel_volestrangler Jan 21 #14
Miigwech Jan 21 #15
appalachiablue Jan 21 #17

Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 01:40 PM

1. This just two days after saying the US wasn't at risk and human to human transmission wasn't happeni

Now it’s state side and the virus is transmitting from human to human. Hopefully fatality rates stay low.

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 01:42 PM

2. I was reading an article on this yesterday, they think certain people

can infect 20-30 people at once, called a super spreader.😳 They think that's how the 14 healthcare workers caught the virus.

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 01:43 PM

3. K&R. And there is no vaccine for this, yet.

I suppose it could take six months or so to develop one, if the outbreak worsens.

Kidney failure is one bad outcome. Scary stuff.

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Response to Ilsa (Reply #3)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 01:47 PM

4. No, not since it's a brand new virus.

But it comes from the same type of viruses that produced SARS which had a 10% fatality rate and MERS which had a 30% fatality rate.

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Response to Quackers (Reply #4)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 02:00 PM

7. and there is no vaccine for SARS yet

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 01:57 PM

5. Perspective? Contrarian?

China's population is 1,386,000,000.

According to a random post on Quora, about 9 million people die every year in China.

US population is 331,000,000

According to CDC information reported on a random site, US deaths annually are just under 3 million, or were a few years ago.

I'm not dismissing the 300 coronavirus cases in China or the 6 deaths, or the possibility that it is now in several other countries, including the US. After all, if I were one of the people or died, or if one of my family members died, my family or I would be up in arms that more wasn't done to prevent this. But these are very small numbers. The number of ebola deaths from 2000-2017, according to the CDC website, was under 400. There is always a furor over outbreaks, especially when they move beyond the borders of Africa, and efforts to limit outbreaks are welcome. But "only" 400 deaths in almost 20 years.

And maybe the international coverage is warranted if the spread of this virus could result in the sort of flu epidemic that killed 50 million worldwide in 1918. Just using straight percentages, that would be more than 200 million deaths today. On the one hand, that would be bad from, if nothing else, the sheer logistics of dealing with this many dead people in short order. Plus, an unexpected 200 million dead people is, well, pretty awful. But what makes modern humans think that we are immune from these sorts of events, even with modern medicine and other resources.

In comparison to gun deaths (in the US) and other causes of death worldwide - cancer and other medical issues accidents, poor medical care, civil and not so civil wars - maybe some perspective is called for. I'm not sure we're at the hysteria mode, but my guess is we will be at some point relatively soon.

Random thoughts, I suppose. But we've been here before.

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Response to matt819 (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 02:05 PM

8. Agree, I think people are buying to much into the media hype over this just like they have in past

years like the bird flu and swine flu for example.

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Response to cstanleytech (Reply #8)

Wed Jan 22, 2020, 01:50 PM

21. It reminds me of the ebola self-test.

"If you watch Fox News, you have Ebola."

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Response to matt819 (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 02:27 PM

11. We shouldn't be hysterical, but definitely should be guarded

That’s why we have places like the CDC that monitors these situations. If anything, it’ll serve as a reminder to people to wash their damn hands once in a while. Lol.

What we know right now is, this has a high rate of infection. The one man that was sick lead to 14 medical workers infected. It has now been confirmed that it infects person to person. It is now in the US.

What we need to watch for is fatality rate and if it can spread through airborne transmission. This will determine how serious to take it.

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Response to matt819 (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 02:31 PM

12. Point well taken

According to the CDC itself, as many as 18,000,000 people caught the flu in 2019 and as many as 17,000 people died because of the flu.
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/burden/preliminary-in-season-estimates.htm

Not trying to diminish the seriousness we should take this new viral outbreak but we should also keep perspective and be calm.
We are no where near the level of panic of the Spanish flu outbreak of 1918, that killed more people in the world than died in WWI.

Stay aware and be informed and wash your hands. That is your best defense

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Response to angrychair (Reply #12)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 03:21 PM

16. Putting this into perspective is useful. It's scary mostly because it's new

An average flu kills maybe 1%, mostly the young, old and medically vulnerable. So far, this has killed 2%, but that 2% might be inflated because that's among people who were ill enough to seek medical care.

The 1918 flu pandemic killed 10%-20%, depending on the source (and the population) and killed many adults in their prime. There were three waves of this flu, the second wave being the deadliest.

So even if this turns out to be twice as deadly as a normal flu virus, it's not nearly as scary as the last pandemic.

There are still a lot of questions around transmission method and viral load and patient susceptibility that need to be answered but I'm not quite ready to hit the panic button and stock up on surgical masks. Right now, we don't know how many people have gotten over it with just a case of the sniffles because large scale testing for antibodies won't happen for a while.

I'm sure people will be shrieking coverup at China. That has not been the case since they have been on the outlook for mutated coronavirus for the last several years and announced it immediately upon discovery. The truth is that a less virulent strain is always harder to track because people who catch the mildest cases of it don't go to the doctor.

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Response to matt819 (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 08:30 PM

18. The fact is, some modern humans work in laboratories

to develop biological weapons of this and other types.

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 01:58 PM

6. A 2% death rate would result in over 6M US deaths. This is serious stuff here.

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Response to LonePirate (Reply #6)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 02:14 PM

10. Is that 2% of the population dying, or 2% of the people who contract the disease?

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Response to Pacifist Patriot (Reply #10)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 10:53 PM

19. The later

So far it has killed six of the 300 people it has infected. The CDC says it appears to be less courageous than the measles or the flu:

While there's much to learn about how easily the virus can be transmitted human-to-human, health officials said it appears that it's not spread as easily as some other viruses.

"This isn't anywhere near in the same category as measles or the flu," Dr. Martin Cetron, director of CDC's division of global migration and quarantine, told CNN.

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Response to Massacure (Reply #19)

Wed Jan 22, 2020, 07:58 AM

20. I know.

I probably shouldn't have been so succinct in my reply, nor should I have phrased it as a question. I was rushed for time and wanted the person posting the statistics to give them some thought. I should know better by now than to make a drive by comment, and a vaguely snarky one at that. My sincere apologies.

I have a friend who panics at just about anything and everything. She's the type to start buying water and boarding up her house when a tropical disturbance begins to form off the coast of Africa. Of course she saw this story and leapt to the conclusion we were going to be living the plot of "Contagion." Panic is the last thing we need. Concern, yes. Take it seriously, yes. Rational response, absolutely. But I've got enough to freak out about right now without a pandemic thrown into the mix. I think I'll wait for the professionals to lose their shit before I will.

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 02:08 PM

9. Will this make Trump's approval drop?

Remember when there were those few Ebola cases in the US, and it noticeably hit Obama's approval rating

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 02:45 PM

13. Dr. Maia Majumder on calculating fatality rates

Dr. Maia Majumder ✔ @maiamajumder

From a #publichealth perspective, I understand the need to present #nCoV2019 as a low-mortality disease. However, of the 31 cases in #Wuhan where final outcomes are known, 6 (19%) have died. 227 remain hospitalized & shouldn't be considered in case fatality rate calculations. 1/x

This is an issue I've run into enough during my time as a #globalhealth blogger and researcher that it warrants an explicit mention now. At the start of an outbreak, CFR calculations that include cases with unknown outcomes in the denominator artificially deflate said CFR. 2/x

To be clear, I do *not* believe this is grounds for panic... But we *do* need to be smart about how we crunch numbers and be aware that any CFRs that we calculate rn (even if they excludes cases with unknown outcomes) will fluctuate substantially as more info enters the fold. 3/3


2:11 PM - Jan 21, 2020





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Response to Dennis Donovan (Reply #13)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 02:56 PM

14. However, that's of the people who have been identified as having this virus

There are probably many who just stayed at home, thinking of it as "a virus", or "flu", and some of them have probably survived it by now. The estimate was that 1700 have had the virus: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51148303 , so that "31 outcomes known" figure probably excludes many whose outcome was OK.

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 03:20 PM

15. This is a big story ... how many will get sick?

and maybe die? The 1919 Flu killed many and here we are 100 years later and at the same point.

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Jan 21, 2020, 07:46 PM

17. AP report at PBS. (The movie "Contagion" is in my mind lately).

U.S. gets 1st case of new virus that caused an outbreak in China
Health Jan 21, 2020 3:41 PM EST

SEATTLE — A U.S. resident who recently returned from an overseas trip has been diagnosed with the new virus that has sparked an outbreak in China and stringent monitoring around the world, U.S. health officials said Tuesday. The man returned to the Seattle area in the middle of last week after traveling to Wuhan in central China, where the outbreak began. The Snohomish County resident is in his 30s and was in good condition Tuesday at a hospital in Everett, outside Seattle. He’s not considered a threat to medical staff or the public, health officials said.

The U.S. is the fifth country to report seeing the illness, following China, Thailand, Japan, and South Korea.

READ MORE: More nations join China in responding to new coronavirus

Late last week, U.S. health officials began screening passengers from Wuhan at three U.S. airports — New York City’s Kennedy airport and the Los Angeles and San Francisco airports. On Tuesday, the CDC announced it will add Chicago’s O’Hare airport and Atlanta’s airport to the mix later this week. What’s more, officials will begin forcing all passengers that originate in Wuhan to go to one of those five airports if they wish to enter the U.S.

Officials around the world have implemented similar airport screenings in hopes of containing the virus during the busy Lunar New Year travel season. The U.S. resident had no symptoms when he arrived at the Seattle-Tacoma airport last Wednesday, but he contacted doctors on Sunday when he started feeling ill, officials said. Last month, doctors began seeing a new type of viral pneumonia — fever, cough, difficulty breathing — in people who spent time at a food market in Wuhan. More than 275 cases of the newly identified coronavirus have been confirmed in China, most of them in Wuhan, according to the World Health Organization.

The count includes six deaths — all in China, most of them age 60 or older, including at least some who had a previous medical condition.

Officials have said it probably spread from animals to people, but this Chinese officials said they’ve concluded it also can spread from person to person. Health authorities this month identified the germ behind the outbreak as a new type of coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some of which cause the common cold; others found in bats, camels and other animals have evolved into more severe illnesses.

SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, belongs to the coronavirus family, but Chinese state media say the illness in Wuhan is different from coronaviruses that have been identified in the past. Earlier laboratory tests ruled out SARS and MERS — Middle East respiratory syndrome — as well as influenza, bird flu, adenovirus and other common lung-infecting germs. The new virus so far does not appear to be as deadly as SARS and MERS, but viruses can sometimes mutate to become more dangerous...
https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/u-s-gets-1st-case-of-new-virus-that-caused-an-outbreak-in-china

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