HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Latest Breaking News (Forum) » Economy adds 145,000 jobs...

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 08:35 AM

Economy adds 145,000 jobs in December as unemployment rate remains at 3.5 percent

Source: Washington Post




The United States added 145,000 jobs in December as the unemployment rate remained at 3.5 percent, offering the latest snapshot of a tight labor market going into a new decade and election year.

Analysts predicted around 150,000 new jobs for the month and forecast a steady unemployment rate of 3.5 percent. Those estimates were significantly less than the 266,000 jobs added in November, although those figures also accounted for thousands of General Motors workers who returned to the workforce after a lengthy strike.

The jobs figures come as President Trump touts the economy’s strength as one of his administration’s top achievements. In 2019, the unemployment rate in particular hit lows not seen 50 years. The Dow Jones industrial average has gained about 45 percent since Trump took office, and fears of a recession have largely faded. The Federal Reserve cut interest rates three times last year, helping to sustain an 11-year-old economic expansion. And last month, the United States and China reached a “phase one” trade deal that is set to be signed on Jan. 15.

But the picture isn’t all rosy. Economists say wages are not growing as fast as they should be, especially for those who aren’t seeing a boost from state and local minimum wage increases. Many businesses are still pulling back on investment and say Trump’s truce with China does little to assuage their anxiety. Plus, Democratic leaders and presidential hopefuls caution that Trump’s economic and trade agenda could eventually stymie the growth.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2020/01/10/january-2020-jobs-report/



Now updated... Our DU economy-watchers will be able to fill in the details during the day today. TGIF!

Original article and headline -

U.S. economy added 145,000 jobs in December, and jobless rate held steady

By Washington Post Staff
Jan. 10, 2020 at 8:34 a.m. EST

The jobless rate remained at 3.5 percent. Business leaders and politicians are watching the jobless rate closely as concerns about a possible recession have eased. The numbers follow a strong pickup in hiring in November.

This is a developing story. It will be updated.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2020/01/10/u-s-economy-added-145000-jobs-in-december-and-jobless-rate-held-steady/

22 replies, 1549 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 22 replies Author Time Post
Reply Economy adds 145,000 jobs in December as unemployment rate remains at 3.5 percent (Original post)
BumRushDaShow Jan 2020 OP
tavernier Jan 2020 #1
mahatmakanejeeves Jan 2020 #2
BumRushDaShow Jan 2020 #3
progree Jan 2020 #4
progree Jan 2020 #6
mahatmakanejeeves Jan 2020 #7
Farmer-Rick Jan 2020 #9
DemocratSinceBirth Jan 2020 #10
progree Jan 2020 #12
DemocratSinceBirth Jan 2020 #17
mahatmakanejeeves Jan 2020 #5
progree Jan 2020 #8
progree Jan 2020 #11
riversedge Jan 2020 #13
progree Jan 2020 #16
riversedge Jan 2020 #14
mathematic Jan 2020 #19
progree Jan 2020 #20
OliverQ Jan 2020 #15
mahatmakanejeeves Jan 2020 #18
rockfordfile Jan 2020 #21
DiverDave Jan 2020 #22

Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 08:45 AM

1. The employers provided the red suits and elf hats.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 09:05 AM

2. You're doing this to make Trump look good. They're all temporary. They're all for sales clerks. They

haven't been adjusted for seasonal hiring. They were all for Christmas. You have to have three of them to make a living. They're all in the defense industries. The numbers are fake.

Other than that, good morning. Thanks for the thread. I'm relieved that someone else has to put up with the crap. It's kind of hard to hide drinking at work when you start at 9:00 a.m.

And now, straight from Rupert Murdoch:

ECONOMY U.S. ECONOMY
U.S. Economy Added 145,000 Jobs in December
Employers have added jobs for record 10 years, longest stretch in 80 years of data

By Eric Morath and Amara Omeokwe
Updated Jan. 10, 2020 8:31 am ET

WASHINGTON—U.S. employers have added jobs for a record 10 years, December data showed, pointing to steady economic growth heading into 2020.

The economy added 145,000 jobs last month and unemployment stayed at a 50-year low of 3.5%, capping a 10th straight year of payroll gains and the longest stretch in 80 years of data, the Labor Department said Friday.

Private-sector...

TO READ THE FULL STORY
SUBSCRIBE SIGN IN

https://twitter.com/EricMorath
ERIC.MORATH@WSJ.COM

A byline I don't recognize:

https://twitter.com/TheAmaraReport
AMARA.OMEOKWE@WSJ.COM

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 09:26 AM

3. Good morning and you forgot

the Census takers!!!11!!!!1111

(I actually did see a notice from an adjoining county to Philly mentioning something like 5000 temp job openings for that county to work on the Census)

And one wonders if anyone Murdoch-ey (including the WSJ) would acknowledge that 7 of those "record 10 years" happened under Obama.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 09:33 AM

4. "They're all in the defense industries" I had not heard that one before. I learn something new

each time! Thanks!!!!

They're all for sales clerks. .... They were all for Christmas ... They're all in the defense industries


Yup, when the generals and admirals go shopping, they need lots and lots of sales clerks

It's kind of hard to hide drinking at work when you start at 9:00 a.m.


I thought you were in the eastern time zone -- jobs report comes out at 8:30 a.m. ET. And one needs at least half an hour before that to begin mental fortification proceedings

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 09:52 AM

6. On the seasonal thing - actually December is a jobs loss month

Seasonally adjusted: https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0000000001?output_view=net_1mth
December: +145,000. Last 5 Decembers including this one: +208,000 average

Not seasonally adjusted: https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CEU0000000001?output_view=net_1mth
December: -278,000. Last 5 Decembers including this one: -183,000 average

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to progree (Reply #6)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 10:16 AM

7. ADP revised November's number.

Per marketWatch: https://www.marketwatch.com/story/private-sector-adds-the-most-jobs-in-eight-months-adp-2020-01-08

or here: https://www.democraticunderground.com/10142416431

Economists polled by Econoday had expected a December gain of 157,000 compared with an originally reported increase of 67,000 in November. On Wednesday, ADP revised November's gain to 124,000.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 10:19 AM

9. Actually we are a nation of Sales Clerks. It is the job most Americans have

It is the number one job held by Americans. Followed by fast food workers.

So our government is bragging about creating the lowest paid, fewest benefits jobs a person can find outside of farm workers.

So, our filthy rich have turned a manufacturing powerhouse into a nation of minimum wage workers....that's what they are bragging about.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 10:29 AM

10. The numbers are what the numbers are.

What some of us question is the proposition that Donald Trump has engineered the greatest economy in the history of the republic when we are witnessing the same economic growth since Barack Obama ended the Great Recession.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DemocratSinceBirth (Reply #10)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 11:02 AM

12. And some Trumpian growth was borrowing from the future to pay for tax cuts for wealthy

a projected $2 trillion additional deficits over 10 years (including interest) just from the corporate/wealthy tax cut.

Whereas Obama cut the deficit.

Shortly before Obama assumed office, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office {on January 7, 2009} projected that the deficit for fiscal year 2009 would be $1.2 trillion ( http://cbo.gov/ftpdocs/99xx/doc9957/MainText.3.1.shtml )

Fiscal year 2017 deficit: $666 billion.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to progree (Reply #12)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 12:44 PM

17. Another poster mentioned net income growth is slowing.

That's an important metric in an election year.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 09:45 AM

5. Links to earlier reports:

Copied, with slight editing, from Links to earlier reports:

Updated from this post of Friday, December 6, 2019: Good morning. Links to earlier reports:

-- -- -- -- -- --

[center]Past Performance is Not a Guarantee of Future Results.[/center]

Nonetheless, what is important is not this month's results, but the trend. Let’s look at some earlier numbers:

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in December 2019:

U.S. private sector adds the most jobs in eight months

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in November 2019:

Labor market remained strong in November as U.S. economy added 266,000 jobs

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in November 2019:

U.S. private sector job growth slows down sharply in November: ADP

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in October 2019:

U.S. economy added 128,000 jobs in October as GM strike displaced workers; jobless rate ticks up

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in September 2019:

U.S. economy added just 136,000 jobs in September, in fresh sign economy is cooling

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in September 2019:

ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 135,000 Jobs in September

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in August 2019:

U.S. economy adds just 130,000 jobs in August amid worries

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in August 2019:

Survey: Businesses added a solid 195,000 jobs in August

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in July 2019:

U.S. Added 164,000 Jobs in July; Unemployment Rate at 3.7 Percent

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in July 2019:

ADP says 156,000 private-sector jobs added created in July

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in June 2019:

Hiring rebounds as U.S. economy adds 224,000 jobs in June;unemployment rate inched up to 3.7 percent

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in June 2019:

U.S. private sector hiring picks up less than expected in June: ADP

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in May 2019:

The U.S. economy added only 75,000 jobs in May amid bite from Trump's trade war

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in May 2019:

ADP private-sector job growth tumbles to a 9-year low in May

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in April 2019:

UPDATE: U.S. unemployment fell to 3.6 percent, lowest since 1969

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in April 2019:

ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 275,000 Jobs in April

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in March 2019:

UPDATE: U.S. added 196,000 jobs in March as economy shows signs of spring bounce

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in March 2019:

Private sector hiring falls to 18-month low, and manufacturing sheds jobs, ADP says

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in February 2019:

U.S. adds meager 20,000 jobs in February to mark smallest increase in 17 months

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in February 2019:

ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 183,000 Jobs in February

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in January 2019:

U.S. creates 304,000 jobs in January, unemployment rises to 4%

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in January 2019:

U.S. added 213,000 private-sector jobs in January, ADP says

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in December 2018:

Payroll employment increases by 312,000 in December; unemployment rate rises to 3.9%

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in December 2018:

U.S. adds most private-sector jobs in almost 2 years, says ADP

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in November 2018:

Payroll employment increases by 155,000 in November; unemployment rate unchanged at 3.7%

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in November 2018:

U.S. adds 179,000 private-sector jobs in November: ADP

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in October 2018:

The U.S. economy added 250,000 jobs in October, unemployment stays at 3.7 percent

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in October 2018:

ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 227,000 Jobs in October 2018:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in September 2018:

Unemployment rate declines to 3.7% in September; payroll employment increases by 134,000

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in September 2018:

U.S. adds 230,000 private-sector jobs in September: ADP

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 10:17 AM

8. 131,000 more jobs than reported a month ago

152,383,000  December jobs, today's job report
152,252,000  November jobs, the job report that came out a month ago (12/6/19)
------------------------------------
131,000   Difference

How did that happen:

+145,000   December per today's job report
-4,000   October revision
-10,000   November revision
--------------------------------------------
+131,000 net jobs increase after revisions of earlier months compared to previous job report

===============================

2018: +2,679 million jobs (223,000/mo average)
2019: +2,108 million jobs (176,000/mo average)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 10:42 AM

11. Inflation-adjusted average hourly earnings of production and non-supervisory workers

(about 80% of the labor force)

Series Title: Average hourly earnings of production and nonsupervisory employees, 1982-84 dollars, total private, seasonally adjusted
https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000032

$8.49   12/1979
$9.37   12/2018
$9.46   11/2019 (latest inflation-adjusted number. CPI for December comes out Jan 14)

Again these are inflation-adjusted numbers. Not much of a gain in purchasing power (+11.4%) over 40 years

For the unadjusted numbers:
https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000008

$6.56    12/1979
$23.09   12/2018
$23.79   12/2019

A bit of a slowdown this month: December's gain over November was only 0.1% (2 cents actually).

On the other hand, this is the kind of stuff that the media reports (earnings growth exceeding inflation, and average hourly earnings of figures like the above, or $28.32 for all private sector workers https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000003 ) and doesn't comport to rhetoric about a nation of sales clerks, fast food workers, and minimum wage workers.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 11:54 AM

13. ..But the picture isn't all rosy. Economists say wages are not growing as fast as they should be,





...................But the picture isn’t all rosy. Economists say wages are not growing as fast as they should be, especially for those who aren’t seeing a boost from state and local minimum wage increases. Many businesses are still pulling back on investment and say Trump’s truce with China does little to assuage their anxiety. Plus, Democratic

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to riversedge (Reply #13)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 12:40 PM

16. How fast do they say wages should be growing? I've never heard a figure

The CPI is up 2.1% over the past 12 months.

CPI https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CUSR0000SA0?output_view=pct_1mth
https://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm

Wages are up 2.9% over the past 12 months.

Inflation-adjusted wages of production and non-supervisory workers:
https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000032
(albeit a little loss of momentum in the last 3 months Aug thru November, up just 0.1%, and December is almost certain to be negative given that December had only a 0.1% nominal wage increase -- we won't know the December CPI until Jan 14)

How much faster than prices do economists say wages should be growing?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 12:00 PM

14. wages up just 2.9%, first time below 3% since 7/18. Weakest year for payroll growth since 2011

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to riversedge (Reply #14)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 12:51 PM

19. Characterizing payroll growth as "weak" is bad journalism

We're at 3.5% unemployment, how much can payrolls possibly grow? If everybody that wanted a job had a job then payrolls would only grow at the rate population is growing. Our current population growth rates combined with historically low unemployment would put payroll growth on the low end simply because there just no way to employ more people.

On the other hand, wage growth is at its highest in, what, decades? I'd have to look it up but I know wages are growing faster now than they have in a long time.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mathematic (Reply #19)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 01:01 PM

20. #11, #16 has some of the hourly earnings series

wage growth is at its highest in, what, decades? I'd have to look it up but I know wages are growing faster now than they have in a long time.


Edited - here's zem all

Production and Non-Supervisory Employees, seasonally adjusted

In the below, "real" means inflation-adjusted, so that it indicates its purchasing power. These are seasonally adjusted:

Real Hourly - http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000032
Real Weekly - http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000031

In the below, "nominal" means just the simple ordinary dollar amount, i.e. *not* inflation adjusted. These are seasonally adjusted:

Nominal Hourly - http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000008
Nominal Weekly - http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000030

All Private Employees, seasonally adjusted

Real Hourly - http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000013
Real Weekly - http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000012

Nominal Hourly - http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000003
Nominal Weekly - http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/CES0500000011

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 12:26 PM

15. All Trump's MAGAt cheerleaders

 

and trolls on twitter are celebrating the DOW and jobs report claiming Trump is the greatest ever.

It's truly amazing how much disinformation there is on social media, and most people are swayed by it. I don't see how America is going to survive this era when facts don't matter anymore.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 12:46 PM

18. From the source, the BLS report:

Payroll employment rises by 145,000 in December; unemployment rate unchanged at 3.5%

Economic News Release USDL-20-0010

Employment Situation Summary
Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until 8:30 a.m. (EST) Friday, January 10, 2020

Technical information:
Household data: (202) 691-6378 * cpsinfo@bls.gov * www.bls.gov/cps
Establishment data: (202) 691-6555 * cesinfo@bls.gov * www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact: (202) 691-5902 * PressOffice@bls.gov


THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- DECEMBER 2019


Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 145,000 in December, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 3.5 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Notable job gains occurred in retail trade and health care, while mining lost jobs.

This news release presents statistics from two monthly surveys. The household survey measures labor force status, including unemployment, by demographic characteristics. The establishment survey measures nonfarm employment, hours, and earnings by industry. For more information about the concepts and statistical methodology used in these two surveys, see the Technical Note.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
|
| Revision of Seasonally Adjusted Household Survey Data
|
| Seasonally adjusted household survey data have been revised using updated seasonal
| adjustment factors, a procedure done at the end of each calendar year. Seasonally
| adjusted estimates back to January 2015 were subject to revision. The unemployment
| rates for January 2019 through November 2019 (as originally published and as revised)
| appear in table A, along with additional information about the revisions.
|_______________________________________________________________________________________


Household Survey Data

In December, the unemployment rate held at 3.5 percent, and the number of unemployed persons was unchanged at 5.8 million. A year earlier, the jobless rate was 3.9 percent, and the number of unemployed persons was 6.3 million. (See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.1 percent), adult women (3.2 percent), teenagers (12.6 percent), Whites (3.2 percent), Blacks (5.9 percent), Asians (2.5 percent), and Hispanics (4.2 percent) showed little or no change in December. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more), at 1.2 million, was unchanged in December and accounted for 20.5 percent of the unemployed. (See table A-12.)

The labor force participation rate was unchanged at 63.2 percent in December. The employment-population ratio was 61.0 percent for the fourth consecutive month but was up by 0.4 percentage point over the year. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons, at 4.1 million, changed little in December but was down by 507,000 over the year. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time because their hours had been reduced or they were unable to find full-time jobs. (See table A-8.)

In December, 1.2 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, down by 310,000 from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 277,000 discouraged workers in December, down by 98,000 from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 969,000 persons marginally attached to the labor force in December had not searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 145,000 in December. Notable job gains occurred in retail trade and health care, while mining lost jobs. In 2019, payroll employment rose by 2.1 million, down from a gain of 2.7 million in 2018. (See table B-1.)

In December, retail trade added 41,000 jobs. Employment increased in clothing and accessories stores (+33,000) and in building material and garden supply stores (+7,000); both industries showed employment declines in the prior month. Employment in retail trade changed little, on net, in both 2019 and 2018 (+9,000 and +14,000, respectively).

Employment in health care increased by 28,000 in December. Ambulatory health care services and hospitals added jobs over the month (+23,000 and +9,000, respectively). Health care added 399,000 jobs in 2019, compared with an increase of 350,000 in 2018.

Employment in leisure and hospitality continued to trend up in December (+40,000). The industry added 388,000 jobs in 2019, similar to the increase in 2018 (+359,000).

Mining employment declined by 8,000 in December. In 2019, employment in mining declined by 24,000, after rising by 63,000 in 2018.

Construction employment changed little in December (+20,000). Employment in the industry rose by 151,000 in 2019, about half of the 2018 gain of 307,000.

In December, employment in professional and business services showed little change (+10,000). The industry added 397,000 jobs in 2019, down from an increase of 561,000 jobs in 2018.

Employment in transportation and warehousing changed little in December (-10,000). Employment in the industry increased by 57,000 in 2019, about one-fourth of the 2018 gain of 216,000.

Manufacturing employment was little changed in December (-12,000). Employment in the industry changed little in 2019 (+46,000), after increasing in 2018 (+264,000).

In December, employment showed little change in other major industries, including wholesale trade, information, financial activities, and government.

In December, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 3 cents to $28.32. Over the last 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 2.9 percent. In December, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees, at $23.79, were little changed (+2 cents). (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 34.3 hours in December. In manufacturing, the average workweek and overtime remained at 40.5 hours and 3.2 hours, respectively. The average workweek of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees held at 33.5 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for October was revised down by 4,000 from +156,000 to +152,000, and the change for November was revised down by 10,000 from +266,000 to +256,000. With these revisions, employment gains in October and November combined were 14,000 lower than previously reported. (Monthly revisions result from additional reports received from businesses and government agencies since the last published estimates and from the recalculation of seasonal factors.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 184,000 over the last 3 months.

_____________
The Employment Situation for January is scheduled to be released on Friday, February 7, 2020, at 8:30 a.m. (EST).

* * * * *

[center]Facilities for Sensory Impaired[/center]

Information from these releases will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: 202-691-5200, Federal Relay Services: 1-800-877-8339.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 01:17 PM

21. Those are terrible numbers for jobs. Should be higher

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jan 10, 2020, 03:37 PM

22. Yeah, I know someone with 3 of them

Oh, wait, 2 were for the holidays.
So she is looking for other jobs to pay her bills.
Low wage, low hour jobs...but YAY!! Lots of jobs..

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread