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Sat Jul 20, 2019, 10:08 AM

A Derecho, a Widespread Destructive Thunderstorm Wind Event, Swept Across Minnesota, Wisconsin and M

Source: Weather.com

The derecho first organized in central Minnesota between the Twin Cities and Duluth, dumping hail as large as baseballs in Pine City late Friday afternoon, smashing vehicle windshields on Interstate 35. Wind-driven hail reportedly flattened crops in the area. At least three buildings were damaged in the nearby town of West Rock, Minnesota.

A trained spotter recorded a wind gust up to 84 mph and sustained winds of 73 mph for five minutes in Cushing, Wisconsin as the developing squall line crossing into northwest Wisconsin.

Turtle Lake, Wisconsin, about 55 miles northeast of St. Paul, was particularly hard hit Friday evening. A roof was ripped off one business, siding partially torn off a hotel and numerous trees were downed. Power was knocked out to many customers in Polk and Burnett counties as storms tore through.

Two barns, a garage and silo were reportedly downed and power poles were bent or snapped in Clark County, Wisconsin, and a well-constructed pole barn was destroyed in neighboring Marathon County.

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Read more: https://weather.com/storms/severe/news/2019-07-19-severe-outbreak-upper-midwest-forecast



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A Derecho, a Widespread Destructive Thunderstorm Wind Event, Swept Across Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan

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Reply A Derecho, a Widespread Destructive Thunderstorm Wind Event, Swept Across Minnesota, Wisconsin and M (Original post)
jpak Jul 20 OP
greymattermom Jul 20 #1
Texin Jul 20 #2
certainot Jul 21 #30
kcr Jul 21 #35
Botany Jul 20 #3
OnlinePoker Jul 20 #18
Botany Jul 20 #19
OnlinePoker Jul 20 #20
Botany Jul 20 #21
OnlinePoker Jul 20 #23
Quackers Jul 20 #29
CaptainTruth Jul 20 #22
whistler162 Jul 20 #4
yaesu Jul 20 #17
SergeStorms Jul 21 #31
whistler162 Jul 21 #36
theophilus Jul 20 #5
Rural_Progressive Jul 20 #7
Kindnesscostszero Jul 20 #6
nitpicker Jul 21 #32
Kindnesscostszero Jul 22 #38
magicarpet Jul 20 #8
Ferrets are Cool Jul 20 #9
magicarpet Jul 20 #10
Ferrets are Cool Jul 20 #16
onethatcares Jul 20 #13
SleeplessinSoCal Jul 20 #11
Backseat Driver Jul 20 #12
sandensea Jul 20 #25
Marthe48 Jul 20 #14
yaesu Jul 20 #15
yaesu Jul 20 #24
Talitha Jul 20 #26
Wellstone ruled Jul 20 #27
bronxiteforever Jul 20 #28
elocs Jul 21 #33
ewagner Jul 21 #34
roamer65 Jul 22 #37

Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 10:31 AM

1. My brother has a camper trailer on Bone Lake

All the folks in the neighborhood spent the storm sitting on the floor at Wilkins. There's a lot of damage, but no injuries in that area.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 10:35 AM

2. These sudden downburst explosive winds are not isolated to the upper mid-west.

I live in Dallas, TX and in early June we had such a destructive storm people are still picking up the pieces. I'm in my sixties and I've seen a lot of wild weather, but I've NEVER seen the kind of explosive wind hit like that one did with that storm. The area I live in saw old growth trees flattened. Windows along the northwest side of buildings and homes were completely demolished. Power lines were downed and cars outside without protection were completely destroyed by large hail. We were out of electric power for three days. The area is just now beginning to clear away the storm debris. I was shocked when I was able to drive around a few days after. The amount of damage was staggering. It looked more like several tornadoes skipped down in various locations, but there were no tornadoes that Sunday. It was just the sheer force of the wind that left much of the area looking as if there had been bombs dropped.

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Response to Texin (Reply #2)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 12:25 AM

30. and we let 88 universities support 260 limbaugh stations that deny global warming

the communities around those schools could eliminate a major source of denial if they got those schools to start looking for alternative apolitical stations to broadcast sports on - they have no excuse - the hail is just going to get larger, winds stronger

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Response to Texin (Reply #2)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 09:42 AM

35. Indeed. Memphis was hit with a big one in 2003, when I lived there

"Hurricane Elvis" had 100 mph winds, and seven people died. We had no power for over a week in July, and the roads around us were impassable with all the trees down. It was like we were hit by an inland hurricane, without warning. I thought it was a tornado when it was happening.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 10:36 AM

3. Welcome to climate change.

Derechos are inland hurricanes that get their power from warm temps.

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Response to Botany (Reply #3)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 02:47 PM

18. Welcome to weather.

Derechos in that part of Minnesota occur once every year to two years on average.

https://www.spc.noaa.gov/misc/AbtDerechos/derechofacts.htm

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Response to OnlinePoker (Reply #18)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 03:35 PM

19. We had one in OH in 2012 that was 100% from climate change ....

... it started small around Chicago and by the time it hit the east coast it went from
N.J. down to the Carolinas. It was a bastard. Not only did it kill something like 20
people during the storm but on the back end we had 1 week of 100 F temps. With
the power knocked out I forget the # of senior citizens who died because they had no
A.C..

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Response to Botany (Reply #19)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 03:57 PM

20. From the link I gave, Ohio gets one a year on average.

Where is the proof it was climate change? Even the link says this about Derchos and CC: Thus, the net change in instability --- that is, the net change in the potential for strong updraft development --- likely would be minimal. In addition, although a warmer environment implies greater atmospheric moisture content and conditional instability (instability related to the release of latent heat during condensation; this is the type of instability that fuels a hurricane), all other factors being equal, the increased moisture also would yield more widespread low-level clouds. Such cloudiness would negatively impact storm initiation and derecho development.

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Response to OnlinePoker (Reply #20)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 04:19 PM

21. The 2012 Dercho was like something I have never seen before

It came out of "nowhere"

I did not see or know of the storm no more than 1/2 an hour beforehand

The storm's strength and size and how it "grew" from about the size of county
to >500 miles wide was really wild

On the backside of the storm we had 7 to 10 days of + 100 degree weather. In central
OH we average a best one or two 100 degree F days every 2 to 3 years.

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Response to Botany (Reply #21)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 04:30 PM

23. Here's NOAAs report on the Derecho you're talking about

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Response to OnlinePoker (Reply #23)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 11:10 PM

29. Nice gif from the link

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Response to OnlinePoker (Reply #20)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 04:21 PM

22. Interesting. I lived in OH for 25 years & I don't remember any.

Storms that produced tornados, yes, usually with some hail, every year, but those were always just reported as storms, I never heard the word dercho.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 10:51 AM

4. Had one in the Syracuse NY area in 1998

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_State_Labor_Day_derechos

During the NY State Fair, sound to me like a freight train coming through. Sent a older neighbor of mine into flashbacks of 1939 Poland, Polish woman who survived Auschwitz her soldier husband escaped from Russia and fought with the Polish 2nd Army, she ended up going to a nursing home.

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Response to whistler162 (Reply #4)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 01:38 PM

17. had one go through here in '97, was without power for a week, worse storm event I've witnessed. nt

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Response to whistler162 (Reply #4)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 02:30 AM

31. I remember that one.

It came off of Lake Ontario and cut a swath from west of Rochester all the way through Syracuse, and beyond. It was unbelievable. All my neighbors though it was a Tornado, but I (being a weather junkie) knew it was a Derecho. All the damage was in a straight line, unlike the multi-directional damage from a Tornado. It hit us at about 9:00PM and sounded, like you said, a freight train barreling through everything. Many old trees, that had withstood hundreds of other severe storms, were broke into matchsticks.

One of those in a lifetime is enough, and I hope I never experience another.

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Response to SergeStorms (Reply #31)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 10:43 AM

36. I live in Camillus and there is a

Octagon house museum which had a tree probably as old as it is. Snapped the pine tree off near the base. Luckily if fell straight east missing the house and other newer houses.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 11:09 AM

5. It is sad that it has come to this. Even before Carter and Gore there were warnings.

I lament for the stupidity of a large number of willfully ignorant Americans (and others). This catastrophic climate action will be one of the more forceful campaigners for the Democratic cause in 2020 if the Democrats take advantage of this very sad opportunity. It is getting worse very quickly. I grieve for all who suffer but I pray that people will turn their backs on corporatist greed and begin to think logically again. Prevention is not a dirty word.

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Response to theophilus (Reply #5)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 11:32 AM

7. There were articles in papers in New Zealand and Austraila

back in 1912 expressing concern about continuing to burn as much coal as the countries were burning and the inevitable effect it would have on the climate.

https://www.livescience.com/63334-coal-affecting-climate-century-ago.html

Yeah, the word has been out there for some time now.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 11:25 AM

6. Ours in Virginia was catastrophic ...

"the June 2012 Mid-Atlantic and Midwest derecho was one of the most destructive and deadly fast-moving severe thunderstorm complexes in North American history. The progressive derecho tracked across a large section of the Midwestern United States and across the central Appalachians into the mid-Atlantic states on the afternoon and evening of June 29, 2012, and into the early morning of June 30, 2012. It resulted in a total of 22 deaths, millions of power outages across the entire affected region, and a damage total of US$2.9 billion which exceeded that of all but the top 25 Atlantic tropical cyclones."

from Wikipedia

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Response to Kindnesscostszero (Reply #6)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 04:06 AM

32. And weird

I had four hardwoods that snapped off in a straight line. Fortunately, they came to rest against steel and chainlink, not the back wooden fence (or my house).

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Response to nitpicker (Reply #32)

Mon Jul 22, 2019, 11:09 AM

38. yeah, weird. And the first time I ever heard the term 'derecho'.

I, too, saw many trees snapped off like that. Such an oddity.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 11:42 AM

8. Dominionists and Fascist Christian Fundamentalists think....

.... this is all God's Divine Plan.

We are to rape and pillage all natural resources to the total benefit of mankind.

When things go bad and the resources are depleted, then war breaks out because of limited resources and fowled water. God will then intervene,... wave his magic wand,.. and make everything perfect and right again.

We have no right to disturb or disrupt God's Divine Plan. God knows what is best for us. We just need to bend and flex - but adhere to the will of God's Plan. God will save us,.. he is our salvation.

The BuyBull,.. the churches,... and the extreme right wing pastors tell us so.

Amen,.. Praise be to the BuyBull.

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Response to magicarpet (Reply #8)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 11:50 AM

9. I beg to differ...

They don't "think", they just "believe".

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Response to Ferrets are Cool (Reply #9)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 11:58 AM

10. Sigmund,.. is that you leaving a reply ?

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Response to magicarpet (Reply #10)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 01:37 PM

16. Muhahahahaha

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Response to magicarpet (Reply #8)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 01:18 PM

13. for some strange reason

my eyes read, "Cod will then intervene..........." I guess it's the same thing.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 12:20 PM

11. new 45 name - President Derecho.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 01:17 PM

12. I saw it's bow plowing through on the national radar and said "A-hah - derecho"


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Response to Backseat Driver (Reply #12)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 07:06 PM

25. Coincidentally 'a derecho' means right-ward in Spanish

A sign from God if I ever heard of one.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 01:27 PM

14. Washington County Ohio 1998 and 2012

In 1998, we lost power for a few hours, but the main force of the wind tore through Marietta and did a lot of damage. We had an exchange student from Spain we were supposed to take to Cambridge, Oh. to meet up with a larger group all headed home. We couldn't get to Cambridge because of flooding. We went back to Marietta. One of the other AFS volunteers made arrangements for 4 students to fly to Pittsburgh and meet the main group there. The weather was ok by this time, but the water was still filling the creeks. A couple hours after we left the airport, the road to the airport became flooded.

In 2012, we weren't as lucky. We lost power, just for a few hours. Power company is impressive. We had tree damage at our house. We thought a big limb landed on our car, but thankfully, the only damage was a small dent on the fender and the passenger mirror had to be straightened back to its position. We found out that Nationwide Insurance had added a separate wind damage deductible to their homeowners policy and our policy didn't cover the damage. I was kind of stuck with Nationwide and still am, but as soon as I can, I'm going to another company. It was a bad time to find out that as an insurance company, they don't really do much, except collect larger and larger premiums. They used to be good, but not any more. I used to love the wind, but now I dread hearing the storms come up. I have been trying all spring and summer to get the trees trimmed back, and even if we shake hands on the deal, the people don't come back.

I hope that this storm and the losses aren't too hard on people and other creatures in its path.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 01:34 PM

15. Swept through here around midnight, trees down & power outages but Lake MI took

some of the zap out of it, looks like another round coming soon. They measured 90 mph winds at 6000 feet, luckily no downdraft happened here.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 06:30 PM

24. We never did get the forecasted heatwave but we did get over 6 inches of unneeded rain

i would rather get the heatwave.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 09:27 PM

26. The wind was incredible!!!

Lots of trees were uprooted, others were snapped in half like toothpicks.
I lost power for 24 hours.. it looked like a hurricane out there.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 09:39 PM

27. The 2012 Derecho that formed on the Buffalo Ridge

along the South Dakota Minnesota Border dropped more than a foot of rain in minutes as well as hanging funnel cloud near Belview and Vesta Minnesota. Power was not restored for four days do to a major line going north and south that was completely blown flat.

Our Niece was one of the Spotters who captured the Funnel on her phone. The funnel did hit the ground in a Bean field briefly,the out force from the Anvil Cloud did several millions in Farm building damage. It took the best part of two months to clean up all the trees and make repairs to the buildings at our In Laws place.




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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2019, 09:48 PM

28. Great article on climate change in the Twin Cities


http://mspmag.com/arts-and-culture/climate-change-minnesota/

You don't need a weatherman...
But you do need a climatologist to keep track of the unbelievable changes happening outside. Heres what it looks like, by the numbers:

3.25 degrees. Increase in average temperature (F) in the Twin Cities from 1951 to 2012.
2.9 degreesAverage (F) warming in Minnesota, between 1895 and 2017.
5.5 Increase in inches of annual precipitation in the Twin Cities from 1951 to 2012.
11 Number of Minnesota's "mega rain" events (rains in which at least six inches fall over an area of at least 1,000-square miles) since 1970.
3.4Average increase in annual precipitation, in inches, between 1895 and 2017.
4.8Average increase in northern Minnesota's winter daily low temps (F) from 1895 to 2015.
2nd is the Rank of Minneapolis among the nation's cities with fastest warming winters (tied with Mankato). Since 1970, average winter temperatures have risen by about 6 F.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 04:33 AM

33. I live in central Wisconsin on the Mississippi & watched the radar as the storm moved in.

It was impressive with all of the orange and I anticipated a big storm. But as it seems to so often happen, when the storm reached the Mississippi it seemed to break up. There was a half inch of rain with little wind, no hail, and it was soon over.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 09:32 AM

34. Our airport recorded 70 mph gust ...

and constant of over 55 mph

We live in central Wisconsin..

Fortunately just a few small branches down and didn't lose any of our trees.

I've lived in Florida and experienced hurricanes..the wind sounded similar to hurricanes I've been in.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Jul 22, 2019, 02:34 AM

37. Just wait until we get to 500ppm.

You folks havent seen anything yet.

As it keeps rising, the cognitive abilities of humans will markedly decrease.

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