HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Latest Breaking News (Forum) » New Orleans area braces f...

Thu Jul 11, 2019, 07:36 PM

New Orleans area braces for first hurricane of the season

Source: AP

NEW ORLEANS (AP) Thousands of Louisianans broke out sandbags or fled to higher ground Thursday as Tropical Storm Barry threatened to turn into the first hurricane of the season and blow ashore with torrential rains that could pose a severe test of New Orleans' improved post-Katrina flood defenses .

National Guard troops and rescue crews in high-water vehicles took up positions around the state as Louisiana braced for the arrival of the storm Friday night or early Saturday.

Barry could have winds of about 75 mph (120 kph), just barely over the 74 mph threshold for a hurricane, when it comes ashore, making it a Category 1 storm, forecasters said.

But it is expected to bring more than a foot and a half (0.5 meters) of rain in potentially ruinous downpours that could go on for hours as the storm passes through the metropolitan area of nearly 1.3 million people and pushes slowly inland.

Read more: https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/new-orleans-area-braces-for-first-hurricane-of-the-season/ar-AAE981O?li=BBnb7Kz

6 replies, 690 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 6 replies Author Time Post
Reply New Orleans area braces for first hurricane of the season (Original post)
Yo_Mama_Been_Loggin Jul 11 OP
Traildogbob Jul 11 #1
paleotn Jul 12 #2
Traildogbob Jul 12 #3
Baclava Jul 12 #4
Sgent Jul 12 #5
nitpicker Jul 12 #6

Response to Yo_Mama_Been_Loggin (Original post)

Thu Jul 11, 2019, 08:06 PM

1. Any thoughts Pat Robertson?

Sure seems an awful lot of God's wrath keeps punishing the reddest of states that love and bow to his hand picked profit, the one he sent directly. God's aim kinda sucks based on your assessment of wraths. Maybe you, Graham Jr and Falwell Jr ought to hit your knees and ask some questions.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Traildogbob (Reply #1)

Fri Jul 12, 2019, 11:10 AM

2. I've often wondered why God hates OK and MO so much

Surly two of the most right wing states, so why all the F5 tornadoes?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to paleotn (Reply #2)

Fri Jul 12, 2019, 11:16 AM

3. Right!

Texas and the gulf states, you know the child raping red states. They best get to building wind sturdy Archs And loading up the live steaks to feed on, with ventilation for all the farting. MAGA.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Yo_Mama_Been_Loggin (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2019, 12:51 PM

4. It's a blob of a storm, disorganized, a rainmaker

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Baclava (Reply #4)

Fri Jul 12, 2019, 12:56 PM

5. True but....

the real threat is that the MS river is almost at flood stage due to all the flooding up north this year. The hurricane backs up the river. The initial projections were for a 50% chance of overtopping in New Orleans, getting progressively higher as you go downriver -- which could have been catastrophic. Fortunately that has been trending positive.

Usually by hurricane season the river is at its low point; however the river is at 17' currently with river levees set to 20'. A large hurricane (Katrina) can raise the river level in New Orleans by 12 foot.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Yo_Mama_Been_Loggin (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2019, 02:05 PM

6. 100 CDT update

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCPAT2+shtml/121749.shtml

(snip)


SUMMARY OF 100 PM CDT...1800 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...28.4N 90.6W
ABOUT 105 MI...170 KM WSW OF THE MOUTH OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER
ABOUT 100 MI...160 KM SSE OF MORGAN CITY LOUISIANA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...65 MPH...100 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...WNW OR 290 DEGREES AT 5 MPH...7 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...993 MB...29.32 INCHES


WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY...

None.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT...

A Hurricane Warning is in effect for...
* Intracoastal City to Grand Isle

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for...
* Mouth of the Pearl River to Grand Isle
* Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas including metropolitan New
Orleans
* Intracoastal City to Cameron

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for...
* Intracoastal City to Biloxi
* Lake Pontchartrain

A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for...
* Biloxi to the Mississippi/Alabama border

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for...
* Mouth of the Mississippi River to Grand Isle
* Intracoastal City to Cameron

A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for...
* East of the Mouth of the Pearl River to the Mississippi/Alabama
border

A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected
somewhere within the warning area. A warning is typically issued
36 hours before the anticipated first occurrence of
tropical-storm-force winds, conditions that make outside
preparations difficult or dangerous. Preparations to protect life
and property should be rushed to completion.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are
expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours.

A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening
inundation from rising water moving inland from the coastline
during the next 36 hours in the indicated locations. For a
depiction of areas at risk please see the National Weather
Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic available at
hurricanes.gov. This is a life-threatening situation. Persons
located within these areas should take all necessary actions to
protect life and property from rising water and the potential for
other dangerous conditions. Promptly follow evacuation and other
instructions from local officials.

A Storm Surge Watch means there is a possibility of life-
threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the
coastline in the indicated locations during the next 48 hours.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible
within the watch area. A watch is typically issued 48 hours
before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force
winds conditions that make outside preparations difficult or
dangerous.

A Tropical Storm Watch means that tropical storm conditions are
possible within the watch area generally within 48 hours.

Interests elsewhere along the Gulf Coast from the Upper Texas Coast
to the Florida Panhandle should monitor the progress of this system.

For storm information specific to your area, including possible
inland watches and warnings, please monitor products issued by your
local National Weather Service forecast office.


DISCUSSION AND OUTLOOK
----------------------
At 100 PM CDT (1800 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Barry was
located near latitude 28.4 North, longitude 90.6 West. Barry is
moving toward the west-northwest near 5 mph (7 km/h). A motion
toward the northwest is expected to begin later today, followed by a
turn toward the north Saturday night. On the forecast track, the
center of Barry will approach the central or southeastern coast of
Louisiana through tonight and then make landfall over the central
Louisiana coast on Saturday. After landfall, Barry is expected to
move generally northward through the Mississippi Valley through
Sunday.

Reports from an Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft
indicate that maximum sustained winds are near 65 mph (100 km/h)
with higher gusts. Strengthening is forecast before landfall, and
Barry is expected to be a hurricane when the center reaches the
Louisiana coast. Weakening is expected after Barry moves inland.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 175 miles (280 km)
from the center. The NOAA automated station at the Southwest Pass
of the Mississippi River recently reported sustained winds of
55 mph and a wind gust of 66 mph at an elevation of 125 ft. An oil
rig located southwest of the Mouth of the Mississippi River recently
reported sustained winds of 76 mph and a wind gust of 87 mph at an
elevation of 295 ft.

The minimum central pressure just reported by the Hurricane Hunter
aircraft is 993 mb (29.32 inches).


HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
----------------------
Key Messages for Barry can be found in the Tropical Cyclone
Discussion under AWIPS header MIATCDAT2 and WMO header WTNT42 KNHC.

STORM SURGE: The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the
tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by
rising waters moving inland from the shoreline. The water could
reach the following heights above ground somewhere in the indicated
areas if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide...

Mouth of the Atchafalaya River to Shell Beach...3 to 6 ft
Shell Beach to Biloxi MS...3 to 5 ft
Intracoastal City to the Mouth of the Atchafalaya River...3 to 5 ft
Lake Pontchartrain...3 to 5 ft
Biloxi MS to the Mississippi/Alabama border...2 to 4 ft
Lake Maurepas...1 to 3 ft

Surge-related flooding depends on the relative timing of the surge
and the tidal cycle, and can vary greatly over short distances. For
information specific to your area, please see products issued by
your local National Weather Service forecast office.

RAINFALL: Barry is expected to produce total rain accumulations of
10 to 20 inches over south-central and southeast Louisiana along
with southwest Mississippi, with isolated maximum amounts of
25 inches. These rains are expected to lead to dangerous, life
threatening flooding over portions of the central Gulf Coast into
the Lower Mississippi Valley. Over the remainder of the Lower
Mississippi Valley, total rain accumulations of 4 to 8 inches are
expected, with isolated maximum amounts of 12 inches.
(snip)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread