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Fri Jun 14, 2019, 12:32 AM

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This message was self-deleted by its author (Judi Lynn) on Fri Jun 14, 2019, 02:01 PM. When the original post in a discussion thread is self-deleted, the entire discussion thread is automatically locked so new replies cannot be posted.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 12:46 AM

1. After 42 years of effective activism, the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo deserve a Nobel Prize.

All the more so because most of them are in their late 80s and 90s, and yet they're still going strong.

Thank you for posting this, Judi. This was big news in Argentina - but, as you can imagine, was given scanty coverage by the Clarín Group (Argentina's Fox News) or most of the rest of the pro-Macri media.

They instead devoted most of the day to crowing about the "positive market reaction" to Macri's dumping his VP Michetti, and installing the even more radical Pichetto in her place.

You know what they're saying in Argentina?

"What do get if you cross Pinochet and Pinocchio?"

"Pichetto."

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Response to sandensea (Reply #1)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 01:29 AM

3. Good one! Looks as if Macri made a very strange decision with this guy!

Looked for a photo of him after seeing your post, saw several pairings of his photo with Kevin Spacey, as Frank Underwood from House of Cards.



Combined with the comparison to a mendacious bully, he doesn't seem to have a very high approval rating, at all.

I just can't understand what Macri is trying to accomplish. Do you think he's playing to the pro-dictatorship, fascist leftovers from the Dirty War, and Trump-like Argentine Teabaggers?

So many of his appointments look very ill-natured! (Like right-wingers here.)

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #3)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 01:46 AM

5. Hi, Judi! Yes, part of it is a matter of playing to his hard-right base.

Lots of the same rhetoric you hear from Trump and today's Republicans:

"Foreigners are dirty and given to crime...police should have the right to beat up protesters on sight...progressives will lead us to Venezuela conditions..." and so on.

That's been the Pichetto playbook for the last 3 years or so, when he decided to jump fences and become a Macri lackey.

But there's a practical reason as well:

Pichetto's a member of the Council of Magistrates - a very powerful body that approves, monitors, and, if they see fit, disciplines and removes federal judges.

Macri had been used to removing judges that got in his way almost at will - until he lost his two-thirds majority in the council last year.

His agreement with Pichetto is thus said to be: "I'll give you the running mate slot, if you vote to remove certain judges for me."

And at the top of the list, is Judge Alejo Ramos Padilla - who oversees the Extortiongate case (coercion of witnesses to give false testimony against opponents, and shakedowns).

Also in the crosshairs is Appeals Court Judge Alejandro Slokarr, whose district includes Ramos Padilla's court, and who has fended off Macri attempts to move the case from Ramos' court to Bonadío's (his 'napkin judge', you'll recall).

What a wicked web we weave, right?

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Response to sandensea (Reply #5)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 02:00 AM

6. Horrendous! The Extortiongate scandal is a huge problem he could destroy, then, with Bonado?

There's no way he could miss.

Unbelievable.

Looks as if every single day is a nail-biter there, too, just like what we face every day with Trump.

Macri and his cohorts are wildly devious. So much going on beneath the surface.

Thanks!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #6)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 02:17 AM

8. Exactly.

If the case is transferred to Bonadío's court, it'll be buried faster than a Basset Hound's bone.

Fortunately, elections are just 4 months away. We'll see.



"Oh, boy; oh, boy! She'll never find it here!"

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Response to sandensea (Reply #8)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 02:56 AM

9. Oh, wow! My face is aching from grinning so hard! What a cutie!

It's a lucky basset to come across such a fine bone! Gotta perteck it at all costs!

Such a lovable doggie.

Adding, it's a smooth connection in imagery from Bonadío to a bassett who also is determined to bury things. Didn't occur to me until a few minutes afterward!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 01:27 AM

2. Thanks.

I can remember reading how the military would drug their victims, load them onto planes and then drop them from high altitudes out over ocean.

That's how they disappeared.

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Response to Scurrilous (Reply #2)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 01:33 AM

4. So true. Dropping from high altitudes into the ocean or the River Plata would get it done.

Still doesn't seem possible human beings could do that.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #4)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 02:05 AM

7. Death flights

<snip>

"During the Argentine Dirty War, from 1976 to 1983 an estimated 30,000 people disappeared, kidnapped clandestinely by groups acting for the dictatorship. Human rights groups in Argentina often cite a figure of 30,000 disappeared; Amnesty International estimates 20,000. Many were killed in death flights, a practice initiated by Admiral Luis María Mendía, usually after detention and torture. Typically they were drugged into a stupor, loaded into aircraft, stripped, and dropped into the Río de la Plata or the Atlantic Ocean.

According to the testimony of Adolfo Scilingo, a former Argentine naval officer convicted in Spain in 2005 of crimes against humanity under the doctrine of universal jurisdiction, there were 180–200 death flights during the years 1977 and 1978; Scilingo confessed to participating in two such flights, with 13 and 17 people killed respectively. He estimated that the navy conducted the flights every Wednesday for two years, 1977 and 1978, and that 1,500 to 2,000 people were killed.

Victims were sometimes made to dance for joy in celebration of the freedom that they were told awaited them. In an earlier interview, in 1996, Scilingo said, "They were played lively music and made to dance for joy, because they were going to be transferred to the south. ... After that, they were told they had to be vaccinated due to the transfer, and they were injected with Pentothal. And shortly after, they became really drowsy, and from there we loaded them onto trucks and headed off for the airfield." Scilingo said that the Argentine Navy was "still hiding what happened during the Dirty War".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_flights


This particular bit of evil they arrived at on their own, unlike say strapping people to metal bed frames and
shocking them. Which we taught.

I had to write a paper on this guy in college:

Dan Mitrione

<snip>

"Mitrione was a police officer in Richmond, Indiana, from 1945 to 1947 and joined the FBI in 1959. In 1960, he was assigned to the U.S. State Department's International Cooperation Administration, going to South American countries to teach "advanced counterinsurgency techniques." A. J. Langguth, a former New York Times bureau chief in Saigon, claimed that Mitrione was among the U.S. advisers teaching Brazilian police how much electric shock to apply to prisoners without killing them. Langguth also claimed that older police officers were replaced "when the CIA and the U.S. police advisers had turned to harsher measures and sterner men" and that under Mitrione as the new head of the U.S. cynically named Public Safety program in Uruguay, the United States "introduced a system of nationwide identification cards, like those in Brazil… (and) torture had become routine at the Montevideo (police) jefatura."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Mitrione

A real eye opener.

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Response to Scurrilous (Reply #7)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 03:11 AM

10. Inhuman, sadistic. These people were political prisoners. Tormented right up to the last breath.

In 1960, that would have happened at the end of Eisenhower's 2nd term, with Richard Nixon as his Vice President. They had been charging hard at the Americas, apparently thinking it didn't matter what the heck they did to people south of the border. Expendable. They treated them like trash, except for the ruling, light-complected class, the European descended elites who treated everyone cruelly, too.

So glad you mentioned Dan Mitrione. He is a statement to everyone who thinks torture started with the 2nd Iraq war on the American side, that they were doing torture a very long time ago, and we just didn't know about it.

Thank you very much for this information. People most clearly need to know what has been happening in their names.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 10:00 AM

11. There's an excellent movie about this.

It’s a bit dated now, but it’s called La Historia Oficial. It’s fiction but well worth the watch.
Also, while not related to Argentina, there’s a beautiful, stunning movie called Nostalgia for the Light. It’s about the search for disappeared relatives from the Pinochet regime. It is one of those movies where I didn’t cry, but felt such an ache in my soul after viewing it.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 10:23 AM

12. The Mothers of The Disappeared.

This song is about the Chilean regime, but Argentina's experience was tragically similar.



And Henry Kissinger is still a free man. Sickening.




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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 03:00 PM

13. Reposting this article in the Latin America forum: Argentina group identifies 130th person taken dur

Argentina group identifies 130th person taken during dictatorship
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Source: Al Jazeera

Argentina group identifies 130th person taken during dictatorship
Javier Matias Darroux Mijalchuk, taken when he was a baby, says 'recovering my identity is homage to my parents'.

by Natalie Alcoba
5 hours ago



Javier Matias Darroux Mijalchuk holds an image of his father, next to the president of human rights organization Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo (Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo) Estela de Carlotto, and his uncle, Roberto Mijalchuk, during a news conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina [Agustin Marcarian/Reuters]

Buenos Aires, Argentina - With the cacophony of a press conference just concluded around him, Roberto Mijalchuk sat silently at a table in the heart of the Argentine capital Buenos Aires, with a faraway look in his moist eyes.

He traced the edges of a sepia-toned photograph of his sister, Elena, one of Argentina's "desaparecidos" (disappeared) by the military dictatorship and its ruthless "Dirty War". To one side, sat her son, Javier Matias, his long-lost nephew. To the other, and all around him, were members of the human rights group Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo, who helped bring them together.

It took four decades, but on Thursday, one more piece in Argentina's long process of reconstruction fell into place.

. . .

The disappeared
Human rights groups estimate as many as 30,000 people were killed, tortured, jailed or forcibly disappeared during what the military government called a "national process of reorganisation" from 1976 to 1983. Left-wing activists, political armed groups, journalists, clergy and beyond became "desaparecidos", or "the disappeared". Among them were around 500 children, known as the stolen babies of the dictatorship. Many were born to mothers held in captivity, and later clandestinely placed in pro-military families as their true relatives searched in vain.

Read more: https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/06/argentina-group-identifies-130th-person-dictatorship-190613202509099.html

Latin America forum:
https://www.democraticunderground.com/110867526

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