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Tue Jun 11, 2019, 11:54 AM

Possible Alzheimer's Prevention Breakthrough Reported

Source: CBS News

Albuquerque, N.M. -- Researchers at University of New Mexico believe they may have found a way to prevent Alzheimer's disease, reports CBS Albuquerque affiliate KRQE-TV.

UNM's Health and Sciences Department Associate Professor Kiran Bhaskar, who's been passionate about studying the disease for the last decade, says the search for a cure started with an idea in 2013.

"I would say it took about five years or so to get from where the idea generated and get the fully functioning working vaccine," he says.

Bhaskar and his team started to test the vaccine on mice. "We used a group of mice that have Alzheimer's Disease, and we injected them over a series of injections," says PhD student Nicole Maphis. Maphis says the vaccine targets a specific protein known as tau that's commonly found in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. - MORE...


Read more: https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/possible-alzheimers-prevention-breakthrough-reported/ar-AACI2FX?ocid=HPCOMMDHP15



Mice were given a series of maze-like tests; mice that received the vaccine performed a lot better than those that hadn't.
> This isn't a complete success just yet, being able to get the vaccine to people will not only take a few more years, but could cost up to $1 billion.
> Once they develop a vaccine that's safe for humans, ii must be submitted for FDA for approval that might take another five years.

Almost 1/3rd of seniors are affected by Alzheimer's and it's "on the rise, currently affecting 43 million people worldwide," UNM notes.

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Arrow 86 replies Author Time Post
Reply Possible Alzheimer's Prevention Breakthrough Reported (Original post)
appalachiablue Jun 11 OP
MontanaMama Jun 11 #1
Brainfodder Jun 11 #11
appalachiablue Jun 11 #13
olegramps Jun 11 #26
demosincebirth Jun 13 #75
pandr32 Jun 11 #2
trev Jun 11 #61
Cal Carpenter Jun 12 #73
50 Shades Of Blue Jun 11 #3
lark Jun 11 #4
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #9
lark Jun 11 #12
Doitnow Jun 11 #21
lunatica Jun 11 #23
lark Jun 11 #31
Bernardo de La Paz Jun 11 #37
klook Jun 13 #76
Bernardo de La Paz Jun 11 #36
Beartracks Jun 12 #62
Bernardo de La Paz Jun 11 #39
lark Jun 11 #46
Bernardo de La Paz Jun 11 #47
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #56
Bernardo de La Paz Jun 11 #40
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #42
Bernardo de La Paz Jun 11 #49
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #52
Cetacea Jun 13 #77
srobertss Jun 11 #24
Stonepounder Jun 11 #30
MontanaMama Jun 11 #33
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #43
mahina Jun 12 #64
appalachiablue Jun 12 #70
mahina Jun 12 #71
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 12 #72
mahina Jun 13 #74
appalachiablue Jun 13 #82
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #53
srobertss Jun 12 #65
mahina Jun 11 #45
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #54
mahina Jun 11 #57
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #60
mahina Jun 12 #63
zipplewrath Jun 11 #10
lark Jun 11 #14
zipplewrath Jun 11 #17
BigmanPigman Jun 11 #29
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #44
BigmanPigman Jun 11 #48
Laura PourMeADrink Jun 11 #55
BigmanPigman Jun 11 #59
Auggie Jun 11 #16
Honeycombe8 Jun 11 #19
Bernardo de La Paz Jun 11 #35
Politicub Jun 11 #58
Cetacea Jun 13 #78
lark Jun 14 #85
Cetacea Thursday #86
mopinko Jun 11 #5
denbot Jun 11 #6
AllyCat Jun 11 #7
rurallib Jun 11 #8
PoindexterOglethorpe Jun 11 #15
Honeycombe8 Jun 11 #18
lunatica Jun 11 #25
Honeycombe8 Jun 11 #32
lunatica Jun 11 #34
SleeplessinSoCal Jun 11 #20
lunatica Jun 11 #27
SleeplessinSoCal Jun 12 #67
lunatica Jun 12 #69
Doitnow Jun 11 #22
wryter2000 Jun 11 #28
Stuart G Jun 11 #38
Bayard Jun 11 #41
pat_k Jun 11 #50
CentralMass Jun 11 #51
Raine Jun 12 #66
appalachiablue Jun 12 #68
Cetacea Jun 13 #79
appalachiablue Jun 13 #81
EarthFirst Jun 13 #80
marybourg Jun 13 #83
yonder Jun 13 #84

Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:04 PM

1. Wouldn't this be something?

my Dad and grandfather both succumbed to early onset Alzheimerís. I welcome any progress in treatment.

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Response to MontanaMama (Reply #1)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:06 PM

11. Sure would and hopefully leads to advancement on many others!

My parents are at that age of concern, and both grandparents on one side had at least dementia for a while at the end.

Important:
Fixes need to be affordable!

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Response to Brainfodder (Reply #11)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:11 PM

13. The vaccine must be affordable, absolutely.

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Response to MontanaMama (Reply #1)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 02:31 PM

26. I would hope that this could be fast tracked due to the massive necessity.

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Response to olegramps (Reply #26)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 05:16 PM

75. I hope so.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:13 PM

2. Really hopeful about this

My Grandmother, Mother, and two aunts (one paternal, one maternal) suffered dementia and died after a horrible period of slow decline and incidents that could have been right out of a horror movie.

It is so hard for those who suffer and those of us who love them.

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Response to pandr32 (Reply #2)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 11:33 PM

61. My mother did, too.

I've lived my life in fear that I will contract it.

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Response to trev (Reply #61)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 11:00 PM

73. Ditto n/t

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:16 PM

3. K & R

Fingers crossed!

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:20 PM

4. Of course it's not a natural cure.

I hope it works and also hope it won't cost and arm and a leg, but that's probably going to happen. I've seen reading a book that says that fasting for 12 hours/day is also a great dementia preventer and even helps slow the deciine. I had 2 head traumas in 6 weeks, so am trying this to help reduce inflammation on my brain. Hope it works.

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Response to lark (Reply #4)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:52 PM

9. Really? Fasting how often? A relative passed on info

From her BIL who is researcher in Chicago. He said they only knew two things for certain. People who don't get dementia read novels and drink 2+cups of coffee a day. Said reading a story submerges your brain completely into another life and place...which is good for it.

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #9)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:10 PM

12. Calls for permanent fasting, not eating from 8pm to 8am.

I actually used to eat like that as a young adult and was thin and "with it". I've just recently started trying to do this again, still not great at denying myself the late night snacks I got used to, but looking at this as transitioning to that.

Wow, thank you for the 2+ cups of coffee and a story. I drink 3 cups a day and read at least an hour a day and usually it's several and mostly novels. So that makes me feel good about the long term results of completely recovering from my 2 concussions and all the damage that did plus not getting dementia.

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Response to lark (Reply #12)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 02:02 PM

21. What do CBD and BIL stand for? Pretty soon whole sentences will be acronyms!

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Response to Doitnow (Reply #21)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 02:14 PM

23. CBD is hemp oil which you can take for pain

Itís perfectly safe and you donít get high. You take it with a dropper under your tongue. It has a lot of other benefits. Well worth doing some research on. I think BIL is short for brother in law.

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Response to Doitnow (Reply #21)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 03:12 PM

31. I didn't use those, but I know what they are.

CDB, not sure the exact name but it's cannabis oil without the thc - the component that gets you high.
Bil - brother in law

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Response to lark (Reply #31)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 04:16 PM

37. CBD, not CDB. . . . nt

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #37)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 05:23 PM

76. Yes:

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Response to Doitnow (Reply #21)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 04:14 PM

36. CannaBiDiol and Brother-In-Law. Cannabidiol is not psychoactive. . . . nt

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #36)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:08 AM

62. ... but a brother-in-law COULD be.



===========

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Response to lark (Reply #12)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 04:22 PM

39. "Fasting" 8pm to 8am? That's NORMAL! Why do you think it is called BREAKfast?


That's NOT fasting. That's normal.

Late-night snacks are NOT NORMAL.

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #39)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 06:38 PM

46. I haven't eaten like that since I was in my 40's.

I started working long hours and rarely got home before 8pm so generally ate around 9 or would just have an immediate snack then eat something small before I went to bed. I ate breakfast around 7, so my non-eating was only from 9:30 - 7, not 12 hours so I gaind weight. I did that for 20 years and now have the habit of eating later and it's hard to break.

BTW - the snark was unnecessary and not nice.

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Response to lark (Reply #46)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 06:49 PM

47. Ah, that makes sense. Sorry, it was snark against the promoters labeling it fasting, not you.


Good wishes finding the right food regimen for yourself. Nutrition and gut health are foundational to all health, so it is the right kind of quest.

For you:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/intermittent-fasting-surprising-update-2018062914156

A study in Alabama with obese pre-diabetic men found that fasting 16 hours daily worked better than the more normal 12 hours: eating 7am to 3pm vs eating 7am to 7pm.

I'd say that by extension this supports the concept that 12 hours daily with no food might be better than 8 hours with no food.

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #39)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:47 PM

56. I was thinking the same thing. :). But maybe it

Relates to how important good sleep is and perhaps that food digestion can affect sleep? I don't know. But did have a 1980s flashback...a diet that was the fad at the time. You couldn't eat within 8 hrs of going to sleep. Remember a guy at work who ate supper at 3pm. He lost tons of weight.

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Response to lark (Reply #12)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 04:28 PM

40. It's NOT reading. That's association, not causation. There are other REAL activities to stave off A

There are several real things that hold it off (as much as it can be held off). People who do these things are likely to read, so the reading is merely associative. I'm sure it helps a bit in itself, but studies have found the following things help:

* Crossword puzzles (new words and new ways of thinking of words)

* Playing a musical instrument (engages memory and coordination with complex patterns)

* Playing mental games of skill like Chess and Go (igo, baduk, weiqui) where opponents are always creating new patterns

* Gardening (exercise, meditation, planning, working with patterns)

* Dancing (aerobic exercise, coordination with complex patterns)

I'm doing three of those and trying to get myself to regularly spend a little time learning a musical instrument.

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #40)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 05:46 PM

42. I am not a doctor or scientist...just passing on what

An Alzheimer's researcher passed on to us. Operative word - novel reading. Coffee. And actually, he said they had proven that crosswords do nothing to help. So there you have it.

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #42)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 07:05 PM

49. I vaguely remember crosswords being "disproven" so I searched and found the opposite


I think it is a lifetime of intellectual and physical activity that has the biggest effects. Never too late too start, but best to start in youth.

* 40 year study with reference to crossword puzzles and reading as example activities. From 2012, article from 2019.
http://sciencenordic.com/crosswords-knitting-and-gardening-lower-risk-alzheimers

* Long term Finnish study w 1000 people, from 2015. Reported in Lancet.
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/mar/12/dancing-sudoku-fish-and-fruit-the-keys-to-a-mentally-alert-old-age

I think there is confusion between evidence for reduction in amyloid plaque versus evidence for the reduction of mental deterioration.

I seems that studies show no reduction of plaque but reduction of mental deterioration. Mechanism versus outcomes.

And coffee is good for several reasons including anti-oxidants and stimulation. In moderate doses (2-4 cups daily depending on weight and other factors).

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #49)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:18 PM

52. Yes...my thought is that the research he is doing

Is more related to commonalities and figuring out what the magic mix is of do's and don't's. The analytical side vs. the medical side.

I should have explained that better. And that the novel reading and immersion into another world and the coffee drinking were pretty much portrayed as a "they were light years away" from figuring it out with data and analytics.

If you think about it, it's an astounding task. With infinite factors and combinations and who knows if they have all the factors even needed about people's lives.

My dad began to notice memory loss about 30-35 years ago when he and my mom had ordered dinner and he then began to look around for a waiter to take their order. Been extremely slow decline since then. But this past Christmas went up there and we all bowled like they did every week and went to the casino. Since then, it has been rapid. He's 97 and my mom who is in perfect health, takes care of him. She is 94.

Sorry to go on so much. It is just such an incredibly horrible disease. For my mom and for him. To know is horrifically sad. And trust me, there is no good financial way either. Thankfully he signed the house over to my mom in 2014.

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Response to Bernardo de La Paz (Reply #49)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 05:37 PM

77. "confusion between evidence"

Non alzheimer's dementia versus dementia from other causes perhaps?

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #9)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 02:29 PM

24. Maybe novels helped my mother

but in her case, they didnít ultimately prevent Alzheimerís. She was reading clear up to the end, although I had two sets of three books I gave her in rotation, because she didnít realize sheíd already read them. She was also able to play bridge clear up to the end, though she was continually reintroducing herself to her fellow players every week. She pretty much knew me as well, but the repetition of questions was non stop. Itís amazing how differently the disease plays out among people.

Iíve had nightmares about having memory loss and waking up is such a relief.

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Response to srobertss (Reply #24)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 03:01 PM

30. Didn't work with my mom.

She was a voracious reader and passed her love of books down to me. She was only in her 50's when she was hit with early-onset Alzheimer's. My dad cared for her at home as long as he could, but finally had to institutionalize her. Shortly thereafter he was asked not to visit any longer, since she had no idea who he was and it upset her 'routine'. She died in her late 60's with no real conscious mind left. She had to be fed because she had forgotten how to eat.

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Response to Stonepounder (Reply #30)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 03:55 PM

33. Didn't work for my dad wither.

Like you describe, he was a voracious reader and read anything and everything he could get his hands on. Dad built computers for fun! He died at 69 years old...he wasn't eating on his own or speaking. Although, the week before he died, he held my hand and said "Honey, I'm going to go." It was the first time he'd spoken in months and they were his last words and they are so precious to me.

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Response to srobertss (Reply #24)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 06:03 PM

43. Yes the way I took it was that those are the only two things, reading

novels and drinking coffee that they have figured out could be many many more. And many many more that people don't do. Like a giant puzzle. Probably gonna need lots and lots of data, plus analytics to figure it out.

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #43)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:30 AM

64. Here's something. I'm going to go mind my own business now.

194 citations
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/19864195/


Risk factors for dementia.
Review article
Chen JH, et al. J Formos Med Assoc. 2009.
Show full citation
Abstract
Dementia is a complex human disease. The incidence of dementia among the elderly population is rising rapidly worldwide. In the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading type of dementia and was the fifth and eighth leading cause of death in women and men aged > or = 65 years, respectively, in 2003. In Taiwan and many other counties, dementia is a hidden health issue because of its underestimation in the elderly population. In Western countries, the prevalence of AD increases from 1-3% among people aged 60-64 years to 35% among those aged > 85 years. In Taiwan, the prevalence of dementia for people aged > or = 65 years was 2-4% by 2000. Therefore, it is important to identify protective and risk factors for dementia to prevent this disease at an early stage. Several factors are related to dementia, e.g. age, ethnicity, sex, genetic factors, physical activity, smoking, drug use, education level, alcohol consumption, body mass index, comorbidity, and environmental factors. In this review, we focus on studies that have evaluated the association between these factors and the risk of dementia, especially AD and vascular dementia. We also suggest future research directions for researchers in dementia-related fields.

PMID 19864195 [Indexed for MEDLINE]
Full text
Full text at journal site
Similar articles

Prevalence and subtypes of dementia in southern Taiwan: impact of age, sex, education, and urbanization.
Lin RT, et al. J Neurol Sci. 1998.
Can dementia be prevented? Brain aging in a population-based context.
Review article
Haan MN, et al. Annu Rev Public Health. 2004.
[Vascular risk factors in demented elderly: analysis of Alzheimer Clinic materials].
Czyzewski K, et al. Neurol Neurochir Pol. 2001.
Midlife risk factors for subtypes of dementia: a nested case-control study in Taiwan.
Chiang CJ, et al. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2007.
Smoking is associated with an increased risk of dementia: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies with investigation of potential effect modifiers.
Review article
Zhong G, et al. PLoS One. 2015.
See all

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Response to mahina (Reply #64)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 02:56 PM

70. 'Several'? everything but the kitchen sink. Come on NIH, this broad..

>"Several factors are related to dementia, e.g. age, ethnicity, sex, genetic factors, physical activity, smoking, drug use, education level, alcohol consumption, body mass index, comorbidity, and environmental factors.

In this review, we focus on studies that have evaluated the association between these factors and the risk of dementia, especially AD and vascular dementia. We also suggest future research directions for researchers in dementia-related fields."

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #70)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 04:00 PM

71. There are lots of studies. You can search the published journal articles on pubmed directly.

I just picked one with tons of citations. Find all here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/

From the quick start guide:

Clinical study category

The clinical study categories use built-in search filters that will limit retrieval to citations to articles reporting research conducted with specific methodologies, including those that report applied clinical research. To find citations for a specific clinical study category:

1.
Click Clinical Queries from the PubMed homepage or from the advanced search more resources menu.

2.
Enter your search terms in the search box, and then click search.



Itís our research and itís available for all of us to read, at least the abstracts.

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Response to mahina (Reply #71)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 10:36 PM

72. Thanks Mahina! You rock

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #72)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 12:26 AM

74. Na Laura it's not mine.

Glad if itís helpful! It was a big help for me too, not to just wait to randomly hear about a relevant study or just google. This provides actual data.

Of course we still have to notice who finds the studies

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Response to mahina (Reply #71)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 05:57 PM

82. NIH and PubMed are valuable for sure, thanks for posting.

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Response to srobertss (Reply #24)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:28 PM

53. That is interesting. I have often thought...you might be

doing the right things all your life and you benefit by not getting it sooner rather than later. Did she know? My Dad's doctor always believed in not using the dementia or Alzheimer's word ever. In my mind, the best transition would be from knowing you are losing your memory to not remembering that.

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #53)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 01:16 AM

65. My mother knew

She was always saying, ďI canít believe what an idiot Iíve become.Ē And when my older brother died she couldnít understand why she couldnít feel the grief properly. She kept saying, ďWhat have I become?Ē In my nightmares I know Iíve lost my memory and itís like Iíve lost a mental anchor. I keep fishing around for something to latch on to to bring back my focus. I have no idea if thatís what itís really like, but it isnít fun.

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #9)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 06:35 PM

45. I searched "pubmed, dementia, coffee,novels"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20182054


J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20 Suppl 1:S167-74. doi: 10.3233/JAD-2010-1404.
Caffeine as a protective factor in dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Eskelinen MH1, Kivipelto M.
Author information
Abstract
Caffeine has well-known short-term stimulating effects on central nervous system, but the long-term impacts on cognition have been less clear. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are rapidly increasing public health problems in ageing populations and at the moment curative treatment is lacking. Thus, the putative protective effects of caffeine against dementia/AD are of great interest. Here, we discuss findings from the longitudinal epidemiological studies about caffeine/coffee/tea and dementia/AD/cognitive functioning with a special emphasis on our recent results from the Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study. The findings of the previous studies are somewhat inconsistent, but most studies (3 out of 5) support coffee's favorable effects against cognitive decline, dementia or AD. In addition, two studies had combined coffee and tea drinking and indicated some positive effects on cognitive functioning. For tea drinking, protective effects against cognitive decline/dementia are still less evident. In the CAIDE study, coffee drinking of 3-5 cups per day at midlife was associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD by about 65% at late-life. In conclusion, coffee drinking may be associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD. This may be mediated by caffeine and/or other mechanisms like antioxidant capacity and increased insulin sensitivity. This finding might open possibilities for prevention or postponing the onset of dementia/AD.
PMID: 20182054 DOI: 10.3233/JAD-2010-1404
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Google+
Publication type, MeSH terms, Substances

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29807456
Send to
Dementia (London). 2018 Jan 1:1471301218778398. doi: 10.1177/1471301218778398. [Epub ahead of print]
Dementia and detectives: Alzheimer's disease in crime fiction.

Orr DM1.
Author information
Abstract
Fictional representations of dementia have burgeoned in recent years, and scholars have amply explored their double-edged capacity to promote tragic perspectives or normalising images of 'living well' with the condition. Yet to date, there has been only sparse consideration of the treatment afforded dementia within the genre of crime fiction. Focusing on two novels, Emma Healey's Elizabeth is Missing and Alice LaPlante's Turn of Mind, this article considers what it means in relation to the ethics of representation that these authors choose to cast as their amateur detective narrators women who have dementia. Analysing how their narrative portrayals frame the experience of living with dementia, it becomes apparent that features of the crime genre inflect the meanings conveyed. While aspects of the novels may reinforce problem-based discourses around dementia, in other respects they may spur meaningful reflection about it among the large readership of this genre.
KEYWORDS:
Alzheimerís disease; crime fiction; dementia; detective fiction; genre; literary gerontology; representation




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Response to mahina (Reply #45)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:34 PM

54. Interesting. So reading and dementia didn't pop up

huh.

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #54)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 09:39 PM

57. I just didn't search that term.

So just now I searched:
Pubmed dementia reading

You should probably take a look yourself. There are heaps of peer reviewed journL articles.

Hereís one:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1151037/

Mental activity may help prevent dementia

Scott Gottlieb

Additional article information

Participating in mentally challenging leisure activities such as reading and playing board games may help elderly people stay mentally sharp. Researchers found that people aged 75 years or more who engaged in leisure activities had a lower risk of dementia than other elderly people. It is unclear whether increased participation in leisure activities lowers the risk of dementia or whether participation in such activities declines during the preclinical phase of dementia (New England Journal of Medicine 2003;348:2508-16). But not all activities seem to be equally effective in reducing the risk of dementia. People who reported often playing board games, reading, playing a musical instrument or doing crossword puzzles were less likely to develop dementia than people who said they engaged in those activities only rarely. However, writing and taking part in group discussions seemed to offer no protection against memory-robbing conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The researchers followed a cohort of 469 people aged over 75 who lived in the community and did not have dementia at the start of the study. They measured how often the people took part in leisure activities, deriving a cognitive activity score and a physical activity score for each person. These were composite measures that took account of all of the cognitive or physical activity of each person. Researchers adjusted the scores for age, sex, level of education, presence or absence of chronic medical illnesses, and baseline cognitive status. The participants were followed for up to 21 years. More than half the participants were followed for at least five years. Over a median follow up period of 5.1 years dementia developed in 124 people (Alzheimer's disease in 61 people, vascular dementia in 30, mixed dementia in 25, and other types of dementia in eight). Among the leisure activities reading, playing board games, playing musical instruments, and dancing were associated with a lower risk of dementia. An increase of one point in the cognitive activity score was significantly associated with a lower risk of dementia (hazard ratio 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.90 to 0.97), but there was no association between a one point increase in the physical activity score and risk of dementia. The study's lead author, Dr Joe Verghese, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, said that cognitive activity may stave off dementia by increasing a person's "cognitive reserve." For instance, mental exercise may increase the connections between brain cells or promote new networks between cells, he said. So, while people who engage in these activities may get dementia as often as other people, mentally active people can perhaps afford to lose more brain cells before the symptoms appear. Researchers have shown that people who develop dementia tend to halt their activities as a result. Consequently experts have debated whether people who do less mental exercise and later develop dementia are inclined to abandon their activities because they had an early, undetected form of the disease. To address this concern the researchers excluded people who developed dementia in the first seven years of the study, as they might have had an early form of the disease when the study began. In an accompanying editorial Dr Joseph Coyle, of Harvard Medical School in Boston, agreed that promoting leisure activities among elderly people couldn't do any harm and might help. While researchers continue to investigate the relative contributions of genes and the environment to dementia, "seniors should be encouraged to read, play board games, and go ballroom dancing, because these activities, at the very least, enhance their quality of life, and they just might do more than that," he writes.

Article information

BMJ. 2003 Jun 28; 326(7404): 1418.
PMCID: PMC1151037
Scott Gottlieb

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Response to mahina (Reply #57)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 11:22 PM

60. thanks SO much for finding this. Extremely interesting Mahina !

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #60)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:24 AM

63. Easy as pie. Just search with the term 'pubmed' for peer reviewed journal articl s

Or at least the abstracts. The more the article was cited. The more
Important people think it is.

Itís our research. Dipshit hasnít taken that away

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Response to lark (Reply #4)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:55 PM

10. Define "natural"?

Especially with CBD oil becoming so popular, I'm not sure where the distinction starts.

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Response to zipplewrath (Reply #10)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:12 PM

14. I'd include CBD in natural, but I don't know a lot bout that..

It's just become leal here (medical only) and I hadn't heard anything about it helping brains Are there versions that do this effectively?

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Response to lark (Reply #14)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:33 PM

17. anxiety

Most of the success I've heard with the CBD oil has been as an anti-anxiety. I've heard of folks using it for a Zanax replacement.

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Response to zipplewrath (Reply #17)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 02:45 PM

29. It works on dogs.

My neighbor's dog had nighttime dementia and she gave it Xanax than she tried CBD oil and it worked just as well.

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Response to BigmanPigman (Reply #29)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 06:31 PM

44. Never heard of nightime dementia. We lost our dog

Last September, but he developed anxiety at night...and with thunder... neither had he had before. Wonder if that is the same ? Although could have been the bone cancer.

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #44)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 07:02 PM

48. I never heard of it either but after I did

I discovered it is fairly common. None of the dogs I have had during my life ever had it but my dog who is 16 started to get up and roam around at night recently and I gave her some of the oil and it made her settle down. I never tried my Xanax on her though. I need it more than she does....especially now with the fucking moron in the W House!

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Response to BigmanPigman (Reply #48)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:36 PM

55. You are funny BG !!!!! Does the dog drink it? Duh

Or you rub on coat???

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #55)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 10:28 PM

59. It tastes gross!



I am glad I don't have to taste it! It is liquid and comes with a plunger/syringe without the needle part. How much depends on the size of your dog. Also, after 1-2 weeks you have to increase the amount to get the desired effect then you stay at that amount. Mine only needs it occasionally. Since she is small it isn't too costly (7 pounds).

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Response to lark (Reply #4)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:31 PM

16. A doctor I know says physical exercise is a preventative measure

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Response to Auggie (Reply #16)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:47 PM

19. That's good to know. I'm reading up on prevention right now.

So far, I've read that anything that helps prevent vascular disease and cardiovascular disease, helps prevent Alzheimer's. Physical exericse, a heart-healthy diet (they've studied two diets so far that seem to help: DASH, and a Mediterranean diet).

What also MIGHT be helpful:
Intellectual activity
Strong social connections

There's a strong link between head trauma and getting Alzheimer's.

It's good to know that we can do SOMETHING now to help prevent it.

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Response to lark (Reply #4)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 04:13 PM

35. Alzheimers is not due to inflammation on the brain. Completely different mechanism. . . . nt

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Response to lark (Reply #4)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 10:04 PM

58. Fasting for 12 hours is basically skipping breakfast

If you count sleeping time.

I donít believe this approach works.

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Response to lark (Reply #4)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 05:41 PM

78. Keto diet as well

I've tried it and it seemed to help with cognition. Difficult to maintain though.

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Response to Cetacea (Reply #78)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:17 AM

85. I like Keto but my husband hates it and he's the cook.

I'm not at my best right now, awaiting surgery, so not doing much cooking. Once I recover from surgery, and start cooking more again, I will probably go back to this.

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Response to lark (Reply #85)

Thu Jun 20, 2019, 09:03 PM

86. Good. And good luck with everything

Feel free to PM me if you need any info I've compiled over the years.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:22 PM

5. hope this and other promising threads are covered under right to try.

there was another recent story that humira, i think it was, was showing affect on alzheimers in patients taking it.

i have really been dying of curiosity about the side effects of the humabs. i think there might be some interesting surprises in there.

but if i were the patient, i would be grasping at straws, for sure.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:26 PM

6. A kick for my late mother, Angie.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:39 PM

7. Watching a family member go through this and helping arrange care

Is horrible, stressful, and sad. I hope this works!

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:48 PM

8. Wow - talk about a big find

This could be some truly great news.

This will give a lot of people a lot of hope.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:13 PM

15. Keep in mind this is incredibly preliminary results.

To move from the mouse model to humans is an enormous leap.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:36 PM

18. That's amazing! That co. is also working on Parkinson's. Imagine if those 2 things...

were able to be eradicated. Amazing.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #18)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 02:30 PM

25. It's not a company. It's

Itís research done in a university. Companies sometimes will donate funds for the research but so does the NSF - National Science foundation gives grants for all kinds of research. So itís basically pure science and not for profit.

Usually any patents belong to the University.

http://www.unm.edu/research/index.html

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Response to lunatica (Reply #25)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 03:24 PM

32. Looks like there are multiple universities and companies working on that.

I thought that United Neursocience was the manufacturer for all of them, but in review, I think that it is also doing the research and testing, in addn to manufacturing and selling of vaccines.

https://www.unitedneuroscience.com/pipeline/

There may be more than one vaccine being developed, with trials going on. And some have been developed with trials already unsuccessfuly concluded.

United Neuroscience (UB 311)
Univers of New Mexico
UT Southwestern (dallas)
Novartis
Araclon Biotech
Lundbeck/Otsuka
Axon Neuroscience
J&J


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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #32)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 04:06 PM

34. I'm glad so much research is being done on this horrible disease

It affects every spectrum of humanity so it behooves researchers to come up with a cure. I think it will happen very soon. My mother had Dementia. Itís devastating.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:50 PM

20. I hope this works. Probably not helpful to those with the disease.

My hubby has been on the spectrum for 4 years. Progressing slowly, but surely. Before then it was MCI for about 5 years.

When is it too late to be effective, I wonder...

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Response to SleeplessinSoCal (Reply #20)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 02:32 PM

27. The research shows improvement in mice with Alzheimers

Because whatever theyíre using attacks the protein plaque that sticks to brain cells which is the cause of Alzheimerís.

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Response to lunatica (Reply #27)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 04:45 AM

67. thank you so much for the hopeful news.

We were in a clinical trial for 2 years for a drug that was abandoned a year ago. This would be a Godsend to so many.

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Response to SleeplessinSoCal (Reply #67)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 02:39 PM

69. There is always hope

My mother had Dementia. When the doctor prescribed Aricept it slowed down the progress of the disease immensely. To me it seemed she was cognitively doing about the same for the last three years of her life. She always knew who I was and she understood us and responded. In the end it was pancreatic cancer that ended her life. She peacefully died at home under Home Hospice care.

I really believe there will be a cure and preventive medicine in the not too far future.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 02:04 PM

22. Pretty soon there will be a vaccine for getting up in the morning!

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 02:36 PM

28. A billion would be a bargain

To get rid of this scourge.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 04:19 PM

38. K and R

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 04:42 PM

41. Make it so

My mom had it for several years before she passed away. Its a horrible thing to watch a loved one decline like that.

Only a prevention though, not a cure. Hopefully they'll come up with that too. Every time I forget something, I start worrying.....

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 07:20 PM

50. I wonder how what they are testing relates to AADvac1 vaccine trials?

There are human trials already being done on AADvac1:

Upon administration, AADvac1 vaccine induces a patientís immune system to produce specific antibodies that target abnormal forms of the tau protein. The aim is to protect the neurons from dying.


Early trials were promising and a 24-month randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 2 trial (NCT02579252) involving patients with mild Alzheimerís disease is currently ongoing. The study, known as ADAMANT, is investigating the safety and tolerability of AADvac1.

https://alzheimersnewstoday.com/aadvac1/

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 07:22 PM

51. They will undoubtedly charge an astronomical fee for it.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 04:30 AM

66. I'll believe it when I see it

I heard this kind of thing time and time again and I'm not holding my breath.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 02:18 PM

68. Nada about toxins in food and household products which are

loaded with junk, unless organic. And tobacco use has declined significantly, so how much is smoking a causal factor anymore.

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #68)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 05:44 PM

79. Common anticholinergic drugs like Benadryl linked to increased dementia risk

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Response to Cetacea (Reply #79)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 05:56 PM

81. I'd read this too, and also wonder about prescription drug

use in older people - 'polypharmacy.' When several meds are prescribed it's sometimes difficult to determine which one could be causing issues. The case with Mil taking arthritis, BP meds and experiencing cognitive changes, we never knew.

"Anticholinergic drugs include some antihistamines, tricyclic antidepressants, medications to control overactive bladder, and drugs to relieve the symptoms of Parkinsonís disease."

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 05:55 PM

80. Somewhere someone is salivating over the potential profit... nt

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Response to EarthFirst (Reply #80)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 07:14 PM

83. I'm happy for them to make a*reasonable* profit,

if they could just help people with Alzheimerís. This is still a capitalist society.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 08:34 PM

84. Four comments:

1) If this is developed and it works it would be wonderful for many millions of people and their families.

2) How do we keep corporate pharmaceutical in industry from making obscene profits.

3) "Almost 1/3rd of seniors are affected by Alzheimer's and it's "on the rise, currently affecting 43 million people worldwide," UNM notes." With a world population of some 7.8 billion people, 43 million representing 1/3 of seniors seems small. I think they dropped a zero - 430 million makes more sense.

4) If this is developed and it works it would be wonderful for many millions of people and their families.

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