HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Latest Breaking News (Forum) » She Survived a Slave Ship...

Wed Apr 3, 2019, 10:30 PM

She Survived a Slave Ship, the Civil War and the Depression. Her Name Was Redoshi.

This discussion thread was locked as off-topic by Omaha Steve (a host of the Latest Breaking News forum).

Source: The New York Times

It has long been believed that a man named Cudjo Lewis was the last living survivor of the trans-Atlantic slave trade in the United States. Now a researcher at Newcastle University in Britain says she has discovered testimony from someone who may have lived even longer — a woman named Redoshi.

The new findings, published last week in the journal Slavery & Abolition, are likely to be subject to scholarly debate, because there are few records documenting the lives of the last Africans to be captured and brought to the United States on slave ships.

Regardless of Redoshi’s precise historical status, the researcher, Hannah Durkin, has pieced together accounts from different sources and census records to carve out the remarkable life of a woman who survived the treacherous Middle Passage voyage at age 12, was sold as a child bride, and lived through the Civil War and the Great Depression. According to Dr. Durkin, Redoshi died in 1937; Lewis died in 1935.

“It was thought that this woman was lost to history,” Dr. Durkin, a lecturer at Newcastle University, said in an interview.

But Redoshi was not lost. She is believed to have been taken from a West African village before being brought to the United States in 1860 on the Clotilda, the last recorded slave ship to arrive in the country after more than 240 years of slavery.

The rest of her life provides a stark example of the physical and psychological trauma left on those who survived the trans-Atlantic slave trade, scars that continue to inflame tensions in the United States today.

Dr. Durkin wove together bits and pieces of Redoshi’s life that were found in Hurston’s unpublished writings and an interview she gave to The Montgomery Advertiser as well as in “Bridge Across Jordan,” a memoir by the civil rights leader Amelia Boynton Robinson. Redoshi was also filmed for an instructional film released in 1938 by the Department of Agriculture called “The Negro Farmer: Extension Work for Better Farming and Better Living,” possibly making her the only female Clotilda survivor who appeared on film.

The film, which was meant to showcase issues facing formerly enslaved people as they tried to become farmers, shows Redoshi as an old woman on the porch of her small home, made out of wooden planks on a plantation in Alabama. As a narrator speaks, she can be seen talking to someone as she sits in a chair, wrapped by a quilt. Her white hair looks fuzzy, marked by stray braids poking out of it, and her skin is dark and thick but still vibrant. She has a gaptoothed smile, and cheekbones rising up to her eyes.


Here she is and she is of my clan and here I am weeping to see myself in at least in another 25 years.

Thank you, Mother, for surviving.

https://video.foxnews.com/v/6022124700001/?playlist_id=2114913880001#sp=show-clips



Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/03/us/transatlantic-slave-trade-last-survivor.html

9 replies, 1839 views

Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply She Survived a Slave Ship, the Civil War and the Depression. Her Name Was Redoshi. (Original post)
Kind of Blue Apr 2019 OP
Me. Apr 2019 #1
Kind of Blue Apr 2019 #2
iluvtennis Apr 2019 #3
appalachiablue Apr 2019 #4
NBachers Apr 2019 #5
Hekate Apr 2019 #6
cab67 Apr 2019 #7
RT Atlanta Apr 2019 #8
Omaha Steve Apr 2019 #9

Response to Kind of Blue (Original post)

Wed Apr 3, 2019, 10:45 PM

1. Stunning

Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Me. (Reply #1)

Wed Apr 3, 2019, 10:52 PM

2. Yeah, needless to say, I'm overwhelmed right now.

Thank you for your response, Me.

Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kind of Blue (Original post)

Wed Apr 3, 2019, 11:42 PM

3. Thanks for sharing this article. Amazing. Read she died in 1937...slavery is not so distant in

American's past.

Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kind of Blue (Original post)

Thu Apr 4, 2019, 12:08 AM

4. Incredible, numbing story of true courage and slavery's shame. TY.



- Redoshi, who was named Sally Smith after she was enslaved, and her husband, called Uncle Billy or Yawith.

(Alabama.com, Ap. 3, 2019) Sally Smith, who was also named Redoshi, was kidnapped at 12 years old from an area of Benin, West Africa, in about 1860, according to Durkin’s research that was published in the Journal of Slavery and Abolition in late March. Redoshi and Kazoola not only lived during the same era, but Durkin’s research suggests they both arrived on the slave ship Clotilda somewhere in the Mobile Delta in Alabama. The ship was ultimately set on fire in an attempt to avoid prosecution for breaking federal anti-slavery laws.

Since then the Clotilda has largely thought to have been lost somewhere in the Delta, but a renewed search for the wreckage of the ship in recent years has shed new light on Kazoola’s life and raised debate about the legacy of the slavers who brought him to the United States .A new shipwreck found by AL.com is “exactly” the size of the Clotida, the last American slave ship, according to the archaeologist leading the effort to excavate the vessel...
Read more, https://www.al.com/news/2019/04/last-african-slave-brought-to-us-now-thought-to-be-woman-who-lived-in-alabama.html
---------
A hundred years is very close in terms of history. As kids my parents saw CW veterans at memorial events, both sides.

Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kind of Blue (Original post)

Thu Apr 4, 2019, 01:20 AM

5. An amazing story and somehow, quite affecting. She was alive well into my parents' generation.

Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to NBachers (Reply #5)

Thu Apr 4, 2019, 03:31 AM

6. She died only 10 years before I was born...

Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kind of Blue (Original post)

Thu Apr 4, 2019, 08:35 AM

7. Does anyone know if any freed slave ship survivors returned to West Africa?

Last edited Thu Apr 4, 2019, 09:14 AM - Edit history (1)

Or tried to?

I know some of the survivors of the Amistad revolt did, but would like to know if survivors of other ships did so after living in the US for a time.

Added on edit: I'm not really thinking of emigration efforts such as those that gave rise to Liberia; most of those involved were free African Americans who were born on this side of the Atlantic. I'm thinking more about people born in West Africa who tried to return to their African communities.

Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kind of Blue (Original post)

Thu Apr 4, 2019, 09:09 AM

8. so powerful

God Speed to Redoshi's soul (and her descendants if they're still with us).



Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kind of Blue (Original post)

Thu Apr 4, 2019, 10:47 AM

9. After a review by forum hosts...locking.

Feature, not LBN. Please repost in Editorials & Other Articles.

Cannot reply in locked threads

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink