HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Latest Breaking News (Forum) » Massive insect decline co...

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 08:25 AM

Massive insect decline could have 'catastrophic' environmental impact, study says

Source: CNN

(CNN)Insect populations are declining precipitously worldwide due to pesticide use and other factors, with a potentially "catastrophic" effect on the planet, a study has warned.

More than 40% of insect species could become extinct in the next few decades, according to the "Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers" report, published in the journal Biological Conservation.

Insect biomass is declining by a staggering 2.5% a year, a rate that indicates widespread extinctions within a century, the report found.
In addition to the 40% at risk of dying out, a third of species are endangered -- numbers that could cause the collapse of the planet's ecosystems with a devastating impact on life on Earth.

The report, co-authored by scientists from the universities of Sydney and Queensland and the China Academy of Agricultural Sciences, looked at dozens of existing reports on insect decline published over the past three decades, and examined the reasons behind the falling numbers to produce the alarming global picture.

<more>

Read more: https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/11/health/insect-decline-study-intl/index.html

15 replies, 1194 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread

Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 08:28 AM

1. Plant Native Plants


Doug Tallamy's, "bringing nature home" is a must read.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 08:28 AM

2. So the insect mass has a half-life of about 27 years if it declines at a rate of 2.5%/year

Last edited Mon Feb 11, 2019, 09:24 AM - Edit history (1)

Assuming exponential decay, where each year it declines by 2.5% of whatever is left. Actually 27.3778 years.
(1-0.025)^27.3778 = (0.975)^27.3778 = 0.5000006 . "^" is the exponent symbol, e.g. 2^3 = 8.

With linear decay, they will be half gone in 20 years (2.5% * 20 = 50%).

Insect biomass is declining by a staggering 2.5% a year


They will be 92% gone in a century assuming exponential decay ( 0.975^100 = 7.95%, 100% - 7.95% = 92.05% )

At a linear rate, they will be all gone in 40 years.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to progree (Reply #2)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 09:21 AM

3. Our food crops will start to die out without pollination.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to In_The_Wind (Reply #3)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 11:52 AM

10. And the insectivores will die

Plenty of birds, small mammals, amphibians and reptiles eat insects. They will start to die off and the animals that eat them will die as well.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to TexasBushwhacker (Reply #10)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 02:59 PM

14. We've noticed a decrease in the birds that normally winter-over here in the NE.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 09:33 AM

4. Kick and recommend for visibility and humanity's sake

At what point do we, as a species, care?
“The collapse of civilisation and the natural world is on the horizon.” Sir David Attenborough

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 10:38 AM

5. I only want biting mosquitoes to become extinct.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to NurseJackie (Reply #5)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 11:53 AM

11. Yeah, vectors and COCKROACHES!

Be gone!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 10:48 AM

6. I blame climate change more than anything

I have seen a marked decrease in insects, plenty of mosquitoes after flooding rains, but thats about it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to yaesu (Reply #6)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 11:16 AM

8. A one-two punch of pesticides and climate change is my bet. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 11:15 AM

7. Little will be done until famine begins to hit the first world

And of course by then it will be too f'ing late.

Welcome to the Sixth Great Extinction folks. This time we're on the menu.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 11:19 AM

9. Creepy crawlies are the GOPs favorite treats

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 12:54 PM

12. Between the insect mass decline and polar bears invading residential areas...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 01:05 PM

13. Kinda ironic that the largest insect decline ever recorded would occur precisely when...

....the world's biggest cockroach has infested the White House.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 12:54 PM

15. K & R NT

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread