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Mon Sep 10, 2018, 08:05 AM

OxyContin creator being sued for 'significant role in causing opioid epidemic'

Source: The Independent

Following hundreds of lawsuits over the years against pharmaceutical giant Purdue Pharma, Colorado’s attorney general is suing the OxyContin creator for its “significant role in causing the opioid epidemic”.

The lawsuit claims Purdue Pharma LP and Purdue Pharma Inc deluded doctors and patients in Colorado about the potential for addiction with prescription opioids and continued to push the drugs. And it comes amid news that the company’s former chairman and president, Richard Sackler, has patented a new drug to help wean addicts from opioids.

“Purdue’s habit-forming medications coupled with their reckless marketing have robbed children of their parents, families of their sons and daughters, and destroyed the lives of our friends, neighbours, and co-workers,” Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman said. “While no amount of money can bring back loved ones, it can compensate for the enormous costs brought about by Purdue’s intentional misconduct.”

The lawsuit states that Purdue Pharma “downplayed the risk of addiction associated with opioids,” “exaggerated the benefits” and “advised healthcare professionals that they were violating their Hippocratic Oath and failing their patients unless they treated pain symptoms with opioids,” according to the Colorado attorney general’s office.

Read more: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/drugs-opioid-oxycontin-drug-addiction-patent-new-drug-richard-sackler-a8529711.html

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Reply OxyContin creator being sued for 'significant role in causing opioid epidemic' (Original post)
sl8 Sep 10 OP
knightmaar Sep 10 #1
moonseller66 Sep 10 #2
ck4829 Sep 10 #3
Marrah_Goodman Sep 10 #4
geardaddy Sep 10 #6
Marrah_Goodman Sep 10 #8
Thekaspervote Sep 10 #7
jmowreader Tuesday #20
BigmanPigman Sep 10 #14
booksenkatz Tuesday #19
DonCoquixote Sep 10 #5
Le Grand Pronounceur Sep 10 #9
Aristus Sep 10 #10
Hekate Sep 10 #12
Hekate Sep 10 #11
sl8 Sep 10 #13
former9thward Sep 10 #15
Hekate Sep 10 #17
former9thward Sep 10 #18
Jedi Guy Tuesday #21
Marrah_Goodman Tuesday #22
Ligyron Sep 10 #16

Response to sl8 (Original post)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 08:57 AM

1. "Try our new synthetic opioid!"

"Don't worry! THIS one is not addictive" (TM)

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Response to sl8 (Original post)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 09:10 AM

2. Riiiighht!

And this handgun is only for recreational target shooting!

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Response to sl8 (Original post)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 09:22 AM

3. K&R

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Response to sl8 (Original post)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 10:05 AM

4. And because they did this, non-addicts can no longer get pain relief

I tore a muscle in my calf a week and a half ago pretty badly. I can barely walk, the pain in excruciating. I start PT this week. I've gone through it all with nothing but ibuprofen because doctors are now afraid to prescribe anything for pain relief. It is infuriating.

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Response to Marrah_Goodman (Reply #4)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 10:57 AM

6. Same thing happened to my partner.

She has a bad knee and when she went to the clinic they refused to give her any pain meds, saying "We can't give pain meds anymore."

It's ridiculous.

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Response to geardaddy (Reply #6)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 12:11 PM

8. It's insane

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Response to Marrah_Goodman (Reply #4)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 11:00 AM

7. Agree! This is like saying new tastier alcoholic drinks are causing all the DUI's and alcoholism

It’s wrong to deny patients needed medication

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Response to Thekaspervote (Reply #7)

Tue Sep 11, 2018, 02:42 PM

20. You're about half-correct

The big issue with Oxycontin is Purdue's marketing.

In your example, if the liquor company went to the drinking public and told them, "you can drink all of this you want and never get arrested for DUI, never get fat and never turn into an alcoholic," when they knew their drinks were even more potent than the competition, you'd be on the right track. In "popular" drugs, the closest analog to what Purdue did would be the cigarette makers of the 1950s.

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Response to Marrah_Goodman (Reply #4)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 05:35 PM

14. Tons of people are saying this.

I wish I could get any painkillers for my 84 year old father who can't get by with asprin. I would get it illegally if I knew how. This is ridiculous. Make people in real pain suffer...thanks to the fucking crooks in Big Pharm.

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Response to Marrah_Goodman (Reply #4)

Tue Sep 11, 2018, 01:27 PM

19. Totally agree

I've had 13 kidney stones, I could not have gone through them without rx pain relief. I really dread the next time, because otc meds don't do a thing for stones. I have saved the remainders of my rx meds over the years (I always have some left over) and I hoard them for the future. My oldest rx is from 2012 and it still works fine! I'm sorry for those who are addicted, but for those of us who need rx relief from time to time, it really is infuriating.

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Response to sl8 (Original post)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 10:22 AM

5. if this guy was Latino

There would be DEA agents marching into his mansion with machine guns.

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Response to sl8 (Original post)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 12:30 PM

9. As a native West Virginian, Purdue is Evil Incarnate

 

I've had to fly back home to attend six funerals caused by their fucking poison!

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Response to sl8 (Original post)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 01:18 PM

10. One of the most insidious things about Perdue and other companies

is the way their deceptive marketing copy has filtered down to the patient level.

I can't count how many patients have said to me: "I'm not addicted to (insert favorite opioid here)! I've been taking it for fifteen years, and I'm not addicted yet!"

I've had people right here on DU call me a sadistic ghoul for not writing Percocet prescriptions for everyone who asks.

The view from the cheap seats makes it difficult to see the potential harm in opioid treatment, even leaving aside the risk of addiction.

If a pain patient also has severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, taking opioid meds can cause fatal respiratory depression.

If a patient it at risk for, say, bowel perforation, opioid meds and the resulting constipation can increase the risk, or even cause death.

If we medical providers opt against treating with opioids, it means we've weighed the risks vs the benefits of such treatment, and found it too risky. None of us have thought: "I'm really going to enjoy watching them writhe in agony!..."

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Response to Aristus (Reply #10)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 01:48 PM

12. Thanks, Aristus, for your input.

The stuff I read about Purdue's marketing is hair-raising, and they always come up with something new. The latest (or at least the latest I read about) was combining OxyContin with other medications, like antibiotics or cough syrup, for "convenience."

I read about the antibiotic combo and immediately thought: what if the pain subsides below critical level before I'm done with the antibiotic? That's just wrong.

The cough syrup thing was brought up by a woman who lost her young adult daughter to addiction in two years flat: she went in for a bad cough and raw throat -- by the time she was done with the bottle of cough medicine she was hooked and hooked bad. She was dead in two years.

These white-collar pushers belong in prison.

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Response to sl8 (Original post)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 01:25 PM

11. I hope all 50 states do this to Purdue Pharma.

Our medical delivery system is so broken, I can't even begin.

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Response to Hekate (Reply #11)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 06:49 PM

15. And when pain reliever companies stop making them, then what?

Then the same people will be outraged no one can get pain relievers. Want it both ways...

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Response to former9thward (Reply #15)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 09:01 PM

17. How about this? Don't flood small town pharmacies with about a thousand times more pills...

...than they could ever legitimately use. How about not manufacturing enough to addict the whole country and then think of ways to insert the drug into things it has no business being in. How about a corporation behave like a good and responsible citizen?

I know people with intractable pain. Not all modalities for treatment involve addictive drugs. What they do involve is time with other people, and that costs more money than writing a prescription.

Pain management done right involves careful, individual, evaluation. Have a bum knee? From what? Will a knee brace and over the counter pain relievers help? Is it something that will heal with rest? Does it require surgery?

Does the patient have terminal cancer? Then to hell with the issue of addiction. Treat the pain and improve end of life quality.

Yes, I do know there are people who are not getting appropriate pain care for intractable pain. But judging from the out of control behavior of Purdue Pharma and the tens of thousands of people dying in the opioid epidemic, many more are being overprescribed for conditions that could be healed with a shorter course of meds and a longer course of rest and physical therapy. And yes, rest is hard to come by and employers don't want to give people time off -- but there you are.



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Response to Hekate (Reply #17)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 10:59 PM

18. How about this?

No "small town pharmacy" is being "flooded" with anything. They ORDER this stuff. You are pretending these people dying of overdoses have no responsibility for what happens to them. They take the drugs. No one makes them. They go to multiple doctors to get prescriptions for them. Get real if that is possible.

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Response to former9thward (Reply #18)

Tue Sep 11, 2018, 05:29 PM

21. Speaking as someone who dealt with opioid addiction, I agree to an extent.

Purdue Pharma definitely deceived a lot of people with their marketing, right down to the doctors and patients. By the time it became evident that they were lying, a lot of people were hooked, myself included. So there's plenty of blame for them in this scenario.

Ultimately, however, you're right in that people make a choice to take the medication, and then to continue taking it, even when it's become very clear that it's not good for them. Part of the problem is that people can't bear to be in pain, even a little bit. Sprained ankle? Demand a Percocet prescription! Then when they wind up hooked on it, they blame everyone but themselves.

I took painkillers for quite a few years, and surprise! I wound up becoming addicted to them. No one forced me at gunpoint to take the pills. When it became clear just how much I was giving up in order to avoid pain, I elected to stop taking the pills. It's been five years now, and every day I'm in pain, but I prefer that to the person I was when I was taking those medications.

No one sets out to become an addict, but that is sometimes the consequence of the choices they make. Continuing to be an addict is also a choice.

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Response to Jedi Guy (Reply #21)

Tue Sep 11, 2018, 05:34 PM

22. right, but they should still be available for short term use

Like a prescription for a small quantity, to help with an injury. Now docs are so afraid they don't give out anything. There has got to be a middle ground, a balance, now that we know what long term use does. I am so sorry you ended up addicted, big pharma will do anything to make a buck. I hope they pay through the nose for it now.

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Response to sl8 (Original post)

Mon Sep 10, 2018, 08:20 PM

16. Adult citizens should be able to put whatever they want into their bodies.

All options should be available.

Land of the free my ass.

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