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Sat Jan 31, 2015, 10:35 AM

Venezuela allows possible deadly force at protests

Source: BBC

New regulations have been published in Venezuela allowing soldiers to open fire if they feel their lives are at risk during demonstrations.

The rules specify a scaled approach to maintaining public order, up to and including the use of deadly force.

Defence Minister Vladimir Padrino Lopez said the changes were made in response to three months of violent protests last year.

Citizen rights groups in Venezuela say the new rules are "dangerously vague".

Read more: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-31070279



Sounds like a bad idea.

37 replies, 5463 views

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Arrow 37 replies Author Time Post
Reply Venezuela allows possible deadly force at protests (Original post)
EX500rider Jan 2015 OP
Fred Sanders Jan 2015 #1
EX500rider Jan 2015 #5
Fred Sanders Jan 2015 #6
Judi Lynn Jan 2015 #13
EX500rider Jan 2015 #15
Judi Lynn Jan 2015 #16
Bacchus4.0 Jan 2015 #17
7962 Jan 2015 #21
Comrade Grumpy Jan 2015 #22
EX500rider Feb 2015 #31
EX500rider Feb 2015 #32
daleo Feb 2015 #37
hack89 Jan 2015 #19
leveymg Jan 2015 #2
FLPanhandle Jan 2015 #3
Comrade Grumpy Jan 2015 #4
EX500rider Jan 2015 #7
7962 Jan 2015 #8
Comrade Grumpy Jan 2015 #12
Judi Lynn Jan 2015 #14
7962 Jan 2015 #20
Comrade Grumpy Feb 2015 #24
Judi Lynn Feb 2015 #27
Judi Lynn Feb 2015 #28
7962 Feb 2015 #29
Bacchus4.0 Feb 2015 #35
Bacchus4.0 Feb 2015 #33
MADem Jan 2015 #9
Comrade Grumpy Jan 2015 #10
hack89 Jan 2015 #18
Comrade Grumpy Jan 2015 #23
hack89 Feb 2015 #34
EX500rider Feb 2015 #36
leveymg Jan 2015 #11
blkmusclmachine Feb 2015 #25
Judi Lynn Feb 2015 #26
djean111 Feb 2015 #30

Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 11:08 AM

1. So, somewhat like in America? Where it is not only possible, it is actual police deadly force?

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Response to Fred Sanders (Reply #1)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 12:22 PM

5. Not, not somewhat like America...

....during the OWS protests the US did not authorize deadly force at any point.

During the recent protests in Venezuela around 43 people died.....that would be the same as 430 people dying in US protests. (we have 10x the population)

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Response to EX500rider (Reply #5)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 12:27 PM

6. The protests and counter-protests early last year were indeed horrible. A full report:

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Response to EX500rider (Reply #5)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 05:11 PM

13. As non-right-wingers already know, these protests,called "guarimbas" (violent protests) are violent.

They have always been MEANT to be violent from the first day Hugo Chavez was in office.

Their very name means VIOLENT protest.

You can hope to mislead people for the rest of your life, but the truth will be known, regardless.

Posting the start of a letter to the President of UNASUR regarding "guarimba" as spear-headed and promoted from the first day of office for Hugo Chavez by Roberto Alonzo, a Cuban-Venezuelan "exile" who is currently holed up in Kendall, Florida after the Venzuelan government, tipped off by an informant discovered a group of over 100 Colombian paramilitaries living on Alonzo's ranch, Daktari outside Caracas, waiting to implement their plan to knock over a national guard armory and take over 1,000 rifles to use in an invasion of the Presidential Palace to kill Hugo Chavez.

Don't bother denying it, it was already confessed, and acknowledged.

When they were arrested and taken away, Roberto Alonzo fled to Florida, of course, to live among his political allies.

Here is a published letter explaining what has been happening under the "cute" term guarimba, named after a child's tag game.
It is of course still employed, as in the organized blocking of streets with bonfires, burning tires, and the use of wire across the streets to decapitate opposition motorcycle riders trying to pass through, a vicious, evil weapon they use to terrorize Venezuelans who stand by their votes for the Venezuelan government:


Miles de firmas lo respaldan

Doctor

Alí Rodríguez Araque
Secretary General UNASUR

Dear Secretary General:
Please receive our respectful, Bolivarian, revolutionary, patriotic and anti-imperialist greeting. Please make this greeting extensive to people working together with you in your important assignment in benefit of peace and the sovereignty of the South-American nations.
Currently in Venezuela, ultra-right-wing groups have developed an extreme and way to protest against the State and the Venezuelan people called “guarimba”. A guarimba is a lock-down sector of the city or neighbourhood. “Guarimba-people” or “guarimberos” block roads using different kinds of materials (barricades) and then proceed to control access of people and vehicles to such neighborhoods.

As part of the control they exercise, they proceed to charge a fee (in Bolivares), every time someone attempts to enter or exit the guarimba area. They not only control access, they specially target people using red-colour clothing, and even red-colour cars assuming they are Chavez's sympathizer (chavista). “Guarimbas” are a display of a dangerous lack of tolerance in Venezuela.

Under slogans such like “It is not a crime to think differently” they verbally and physically attack anyone they think may be a “chavista.” Their ideology is radically anti-socialist, anti-communist, and pro-USA. They demand “freedom” by denying freedom to others. They shout they are hungry but they burn-down trucks delivering food and food-storage places. They manifest not to have “freedom of expression” while being close-minded to other ways of thinking. They lay claim to not having security while committing criminal acts, including assassinations, and violent aggressions against civilians and security forces.

“Guarimberos” enjoy international support, including mainstream mass-media. Well-known artists, and politicians have expressed their support to the “guarimberos” in a very well organized international campaign of propaganda against the constitutional authorities of the country. This campaign has achieved such unbelievable distortions that they call “dictators” to free-elected authorities, who are exercising important restraints in dealing with guarimbas.

Current Venezuelan president, Nicolas Maduro, is not only a convinced democrat, and a recently elected President with less than a year in power. Former President Jimmy Carter called the Venezuelan electoral system “the most perfect of the world.” Additionally, the Venezuelan constitution opens the possibility to a middle term referendum on his presidency. It seems crazy to think that some people around the world are supporting the deposition of an elected president, and in fact subjecting the Venezuelan people to a so called soft coup, to assassinations, and other types of human rights violations because Venezuela is practicing elevated forms of participatory democracy, which can set a bad example for other subjected countries.

In spite of a strong propaganda campaign talking about human-rights violations, it is the Venezuelan police force and civilians opposed to guarimbas who have suffered most of the deaths and injuries.

“Guarimberos” enjoy the services of a powerful buffet of lawyers. They also take advantage of weaknesses in the legal system where opposition judges can grant them freedom with ease should police capture them.

“Guarimberos” receive daily payments and armed protection from Colombian mercenaries. But they receive more than money, they have been subjected to a psychological campaign, which makes them believe that Cuba is damnation for the continent, and that to be subjected to USA's power is the only way to development and happiness. They march with the US flag and with an upside-down Venezuelan flag.

The propaganda campaign states that “guarimberos” are students. It is true, students do participate in protests, including pacific marches in support of guarimbas and demanding a change of government. Instead, “guarimberos” are criminals, period. They use the term “student” as a way of softening criminal acts, for public opinion sake. They attempt to present criminal acts as acts of revelry carried out by crazy youth to make their crimes more palatable. They have in fact among other crimes burned-down fifteen universities; several libraries; and natural forests. They have cut more than five thousand trees that they use to barricade neighbourhoods; and with no mercy they burn and kill cats and dogs in bonfires.
More:
https://nacla.org/article/how-venezuela%E2%80%99s-right-discovered-human-rights

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #13)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 06:20 PM

15. They have lots of protests that start out peaceful till the government goes all overboard.

Last edited Sat Jan 31, 2015, 11:53 PM - Edit history (1)

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Response to EX500rider (Reply #15)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 06:37 PM

16. You'll not be able to sell that to anyone who can do his/her homework long enough

to know what has been happening.

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Response to EX500rider (Reply #15)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 06:48 PM

17. Exactly, only the ignorant defend this government n/t

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Response to Bacchus4.0 (Reply #17)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 08:49 PM

21. Seems to be a few making their apologist tour here already nt

 

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Response to Bacchus4.0 (Reply #17)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 11:50 PM

22. You mean like all those Venezuelans who have repeatedly voted for it?

 

They will defend it. Count on it.

Take your McCarthyite crap elsewhere.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #13)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 09:37 AM

31. Let's hear from what Human Rights Watch has to say:

Venezuela: Unarmed Protestors Beaten, Shot (sounds very progressive of them!)
Prosecutors, Judges Complicit in Rights Violations

Venezuelan security forces have used unlawful force in response to antigovernment demonstrations, severely beating unarmed protesters and shooting them at point blank range, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. Security forces also subjected detainees to severe physical and psychological abuse, including in some cases torture, and justice officials failed to safeguard detainees’ due process rights.

The 103-page report, “Punished for Protesting: Rights Violations in Venezuela’s Streets, Detention Centers, and Justice System,” documents 45 cases from Caracas and three states, involving more than 150 victims, in which security forces have abused the rights of protesters and other people in the vicinity of demonstrations. Security forces have also allowed armed pro-government gangs to attack unarmed civilians, and in some cases openly collaborated with the gangs.

“The scale of rights violations we found in Venezuela and the collaboration of security forces and justice officials in committing them shows these aren’t isolated incidents or the excesses of a few rogue actors,” said José Miguel Vivanco, Americas director at Human Rights Watch. “Rather, they are the part of an alarming pattern of abuse that is the worst we have seen in Venezuela in years.”

Human Rights Watch carried out a fact-finding investigation in Venezuela in March 2014, visiting Caracas and the states of Carabobo, Lara, and Miranda, and conducted scores of interviews with abuse victims, their families, witnesses, medical professionals, journalists, lawyers, and human rights defenders. Human Rights Watch also gathered extensive material evidence, including photographs, video footage, medical reports, and judicial rulings, and reviewed government reports and official statements regarding protest activity and the response of security forces.


http://www.hrw.org/news/2014/05/05/venezuela-unarmed-protestors-beaten-shot

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #13)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 09:39 AM

32. "You can hope to mislead people for the rest of your life, but the truth will be known, regardless.

By which you mean:
"the truth as known and interpreted by Judi Lynn"

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Response to EX500rider (Reply #5)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 11:07 AM

37. The didn't have to

It is implicit in American legal practice. There is a very high bar for prosecuting police who kill during their policing duties, including demonstrations.

Here is a bit from the Kent State killings:

Eight of the guardsmen were indicted by a grand jury. The guardsmen claimed to have fired in self-defense, a claim that was generally accepted by the criminal justice system. In 1974 U.S. District Judge Frank Battisti dismissed charges against all eight on the basis that the prosecution's case was too weak to warrant a trial.[8]

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Response to Fred Sanders (Reply #1)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 07:35 PM

19. So the US Secdef has authorized US soldiers to shoot protesters? Nt

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 11:21 AM

2. Compare and contrast with NYPD Commissioner Bratton's recent announcement.

What's the difference?

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 11:45 AM

3. Maybe the soldiers could just back-off instead?

I guess that isn't a manly enough approach though.

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 12:18 PM

4. Hmmm, not really much to this, is there?

 

Rules for the use of force.

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 12:47 PM

7. Not even constitutional.

Resolution 008610, signed by General-in-Chief and Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino López, establishes the “use of force, with a firearm or any other potentially lethal weapon” as the last resort to “prevent disorder, support the legitimately constituted authority, and counter all aggression, immediately confronting it with the necessary measures.”

Counter "all" aggression? How nice.

However Article 68 of the Constitution stipulates: “The use of firearms and toxic substances to control peaceful demonstrations is prohibited.”

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 01:57 PM

8. Gotta protect the "revolution" whether anyone likes it or not!!

 

Did anyone expect better from the losers running this once great country?
I bet the people STILL protest

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Response to 7962 (Reply #8)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 03:48 PM

12. "This once great country."

 

If you were an oligarch.

http://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=post&forum=1014&pid=1002513

Caracazo
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Date 27 February 1989 - March 1989
Location Caracas

The Caracazo or sacudón is the name given to the wave of protests, riots, looting, shootings and massacres[4] that began on 27 February 1989 in the Venezuelan capital Caracas and surrounding towns. The week-long clashes resulted in the deaths of hundreds of people, thousands by some accounts, most at the hands of security forces and the military.[2][5][6] The riots and protests began mainly in response to the government's economic reforms and the resulting increase in the price of gasoline and transportation.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Etymology
2 Background
3 Protests and rioting
4 Aftermath and consequences
5 See also
6 Further reading
7 References
Etymology[edit]

The word Caracazo is the name of the city plus the -azo suffix, which denotes a violent knock. Its translation could therefore be "the Caracas smash" or "the big one in Caracas". The name was inspired by the Bogotazo, a massive riot in neighboring Colombia in 1948 that played a pivotal role in that country's history. Sacudón is from sacudir "to shake", and therefore means something along the lines of "the day that shook the country" (see Spanish nouns: Other suffixes.)

The words are pronounced [kaɾaˈkaso] and [sakuˈðon], respectively.

Background[edit]
Due to a fall in oil prices during the mid-1980s an economic crisis had taken hold in Venezuela, and the country had accrued significant levels of debt. Nevertheless, the administration of the Left-leaning President Jaime Lusinchi was able to restructure the country's debt repayments and offset an economic crisis while allowing for the continuation of the government's policies of social spending and state-sponsored subsidies.[7]

Lusinchi's political party, Democratic Action, was able to remain in power following the 1988 election of Carlos Andrés Pérez as president. Pérez then proposed a major shift in policy by implementing neo-liberal economic reforms recommended by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). This program, known as the paquete (the "package", was contrary to statements made during Pérez's populist and anti-neoliberal campaign in which he had described the IMF as "a neutron bomb that killed people, but left buildings standing"[8] and had said that World Bank economists were "genocide workers in the pay of economic totalitarianism".[citation needed]

Measures taken by Pérez included privatizing state companies, tax reform, reducing customs duties, and diminishing the role of the state in the economy. He also took measures to decentralize and modernize the Venezuelan political system by instituting the direct election of state governors who had previously been appointed by the president. The most controversial part of this economic reform package was the elimination of the gasoline subsidies, which had long maintained domestic gasoline prices far beneath international levels (and indeed beneath the production costs of gasoline).[citation needed] When the subsidy was eliminated, gasoline prices rose by as much 100%, and subsequently, the costs of public transportation rose by 30%.[citation needed]

Protests and rioting[edit]
The protests and rioting began on the morning of February 27, 1989, in Guarenas (a town in Miranda State about 30 kilometres (19 mi) east of Caracas) due to a steep increase in public transportation prices.[2][9] The protests and rioting quickly spread to the capital and other towns across the country. A lack of timely intervention by authorities (some police were under orders not to take action) led to the Metropolitan Police quickly being overwhelmed.[2] Despite initial debate within the government over how to manage the situation, a heavy-handed approach was implemented and a state of emergency and martial law was imposed.[2]

On February 28 President Carlos Andrés Pérez suspended a number of articles of the Constitution, including Article 60 (right to individual liberty and security); Article 62 (inviolability of the home); Article 66 (freedom of expression); Article 71 (right to gather publicly and privately), and Article 115 (right to peaceful protest).[10] These rights were not completely restored until March 22, and in the interim, there was no official decree or resolution defining how government authority would be exercised in the absence of those constitutional rights.[10]

The subsequent crack-down against the protesters included "widespread incidences of soldiers firing wantonly into residential buildings and crowds of people, killing unarmed civilians."[2] Tactics used by security forces included raids on homes, disappearances, the use of torture, and extrajudicial killings.[6]

Allegations of extrajudicial killings of known criminals have also been made.[2]

The initial official pronouncements said 276 people had died,[9] but many estimates put the number above 2,000.[3]

Aftermath and consequences[edit]
On March 3, 1989, President Pérez spoke with U.S. President George H. W. Bush. President Bush offered President Pérez a US$450 million emergency loan. President Pérez thanked the President Bush and asked him to support a change in debt policy toward Latin America, stating, "I want to tell you if there is no change in [international] debt policy then whatever we may do here may be useless."[11] President Pérez told President Bush that he had sent him a letter several days earlier and that he would appreciate it if he would read it.[11]

The clearest consequence of the Caracazo was political instability. The following February, the army was called to contain similar riots in Puerto La Cruz and Barcelona, and again in June, when rising of transportation costs ended in riots in Maracaibo and other cities. The free-market reforms program was modified. In 1992 there were two attempted coups d'état, in February and November. Carlos Andrés Pérez was accused of corruption and removed from the presidency. Hugo Chávez, an organiser of one of the coups, was found guilty of sedition and incarcerated. However, he was subsequently pardoned by Pérez's successor, Rafael Caldera, and went on to be elected president after him.

In 1998, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights condemned the government's action and referred the case to the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. In 1999, the Court heard the case and found that the government had committed violations of human rights, including extrajudicial killings. The Venezuelan government, by then headed by Chávez, did not contest the findings of the case and accepted full responsibility for the government's actions.[9]

In August 2009, then-Defense Minister Italo del Valle Alliegro was charged in relation to the Caracazo.[12] In July 2010 the Supreme Court overturned an appeal court ruling which had declared the case covered by a statute of limitations.[13]

See also[edit]

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Response to Comrade Grumpy (Reply #12)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 05:52 PM

14. That president, Carlos Andres Perez was later impeached, was held under house arrest,

and moved to Florida to live with his mistress.

There are heavy estimates the death toll from his attack on the poor of Venezuela killed 3,000 people. This article from BBC News explains why the number has been vague:

27 February 2011 Last updated at 19:03 ET
Victims of Venezuela's Caracazo clashes reburiedBy Sarah Grainger

BBC News, Caracas

Exactly 22 years after violent clashes between police and protesters killed hundreds of people in the Venezuelan capital, Caracas, some of the victims have been reburied in a special monument in the city's biggest cemetery.

The bloody clashes in February 1989 became known as the Caracazo - literally the big one in Caracas - as security forces loyal to the then president Carlos Andres Perez cracked down on protesters demonstrating over price rises.

Official figures put the number killed at around 300, but some reports suggested as many as 3,000 people lost their lives.

Many were buried anonymously in mass graves, making it impossible to be certain of the number.

The 71 laid to rest on Sunday had originally been buried in a communal grave in a section of the capital's general cemetery known as "the Plague".

Their remains were exhumed in 2009 and taken to a military base where they were checked to verify that they dated from the Caracazo.

More:
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-12593085

[center]~ ~ ~[/center]
I've read accounts that Perez sent bull-dozers to the location where they pushed the dead poor people's bodies into a mass grave site they dug for them.

Photos of that massacre by Carlos Andres Perez, who is still revered, loved by the Venezuelan racist right-wing:

[center]









Former Venezuelan President
Carlos Andres Perez during a
party in his honor celebrated
in Miami
Credit: Conexiones

He was discovered to have used his then secretary, Cecilia Matos to help him set up several joint bank accounts in the United States, totally $17,000,000.00, FAR more money than he ever earned as Venezuela's President.





As soon as the right-wing gets its mutant into the Presidential Palace again, you can be sure these historical images in the murals are going to be destroyed immediately. They don't want the poor of Venzuela publicizing their exploitation and abuse at the hands of the oligarchs, who fear and abhor them. [/center]

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #14)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 08:47 PM

20. And maybe these pictures will be replaced as well

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Venezuela#mediaviewer/File:Venezuela_Shortages_2014.png


The joke of the "revolution" is staggering! Cant blame the US when we were tossed years ago, followed by most other countries who were robbed by the Chavez/Maduro disaster. Proof is seen daily. 15 years and the country will slide further and further into the abyss.

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Response to 7962 (Reply #20)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 12:06 AM

24. Here's another pic. Can't blame socialism for this one.

 

This is Brazil.



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Response to Comrade Grumpy (Reply #24)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 12:40 AM

27. What is blindingly clear to normally intelligent people doesn't happen for right-wingers.

It seems so hard for them to realized that the poverty in Venezuela was created ages ago, that's something any one would recognize at a glance.

The people who have been running Venezuela until February 1999, when Chavez was inaugurated, are the ones who caused this desperate poverty over a hundred years of massacres, race hatred, greed, government assassinations, oppression of the great masses of poor people, locking them out of safe, adequate housing, basic needs like access to water, electricity, fuel, even rudimentary plumbing, access to medical treatment, education, etc., etc., etc.

Even now Venezuelan doctors will go NOWHERE near the barrios to bring help to the poor, and the oligarchs want to push out the Cuban doctors who have set up clinics there to bring help to the poor for the first time in their lives.

They mock, revile, hate the poor, make fun of them, and have treated them like dirt from the very, very beginning. They have NOT changed as anyone honest who goes there will attest.

What would be natural common sense to most people simply eludes ignorant, racist, greedy right-wing clowns. They are blinded by their ignorance and hatred.

[center] ~ ~ ~[/center]
Venezuela: Where the Wealthy Stir Violence While the Poor Build a New Society
By Dario Azzellini Berlin, Germany
April 28, 2014

Artist and documentary filmmaker Dario Azzellini argues the protests in Venezuela represent a vicious attack on the country’s social progress under Hugo Chávez, spurred on by anti-Chavista politicians in affluent regions.


[font size=1]
The barrios of Caracas, Venezuela. Film still from Comuna Under Construction (2010), directed by Dario Azzellini and Oliver Ressler.
[/font]
Before Hugo Chávez became president of Venezuela in 1999, the barrios of Caracas, built provisionally on the hills surrounding the capital, did not even appear on the city map. Officially they did not exist, so neither the city nor the state maintained their infrastructure. The poor inhabitants of these neighborhoods obtained water and electricity by tapping pipes and cables themselves. They lacked access to services such as garbage collection, health care and education altogether.

Today residents of the same barrios are organizing their communities through directly democratic assemblies known as communal councils—of which Venezuela has more than 40,000. Working families have come together to found community spaces and cooperative companies, coordinate social programs and renovate neighborhood houses, grounding their actions in principles of solidarity and collectivity. And their organizing has found government support, especially with the Law of Communal Councils, passed by Chávez in 2006, which has led to the formation of communes that can develop social projects on a larger scale and over the long term.

You will not hear about the self-governing barrios in Western reports of protests spreading across Venezuela. According to the prevailing narrative, students throughout the country are protesting a dire economic situation and high crime rate, only to meet brutal repression from government forces. Yet the street violence that has captured the world’s attention has largely taken place in a few isolated areas—the affluent neighborhoods of cities like Caracas, Maracaibo, Valencia, San Cristóbal and Mérida—and not in the barrios where Venezuela’s poor and working classes live. Despite international media claims, the vast majority of Venezuela’s students are not protesting. Not even a third of all people arrested in connection with the demonstrations since early February are students, even though Venezuela has more than 2.6 million university students (up from roughly 700,000 in 1998), thanks to the tuition-free public university system that Chávez created.

A look at recent arrests reveals that the “protest” leaders are really a mixture of drug traffickers, paramilitaries and private military contractors—in other words, the mercenaries typical of any CIA military destabilization operation. In Barinas, the southern border state with Colombia, two heavily armed barricade organizers were arrested, including Hugo Alberto Nuncira Soto, who has an Interpol arrest warrant for membership in Los Urabeños, a Colombian paramilitary involved in drug trafficking, smuggling, assassinations and massacres. In Caracas, the brothers Richard and Chamel Akl—who own a private military company, Akl Elite Corporation, and represent the Venezuelan branch of the private military contractor Risk Inc.—were arrested while driving an armored vehicle in possession of firearms, explosives and military equipment. Their car had been equipped with pipes to be activated from inside to disperse motor oil and nails on the streets, not to mention tear gas grenades, homemade bombs, pistols, gas masks, bulletproof vests, night-vision devices, gasoline tanks and knives.

More:
http://creativetimereports.org/2014/04/28/venezuela-where-the-wealthy-stir-violence-while-the-poor-build-a-new-society-dario-azzellini-protests-in-venezuela/

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Response to Comrade Grumpy (Reply #24)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 01:30 AM

28. Great idea! Here are photos from US-supported (largest recipient of US aid in LatAm) Colombia.

[center]

After a landslide in the Manizales slum.



Bogota, Colombia



Bogota



Bogota



Bogota[/center]
At least these people are not living in an area like Buenaventura, Colombia, where neighbors hear people shrieking wildly at night as they are hacked to pieces by gangs in their "chop houses," nor have their children been made ill drinking water contaminated by run-off from mass graves as has happened in La Macarena, Meta, Colombia.

Colombian Mass Grave Of More Than 2000 May Be Civilian Trade Unionists, Not Military Casualties
Colombia is currently the most dangerous country in the world for trade unionists, and the U.S. is likely implicated in the murders.

August 5, 2010 | If you want to understand what’s behind the recent tension between Colombia and Venezuela, think “smokescreen,” and then go back several months to some sick children in the Department of Meta, just south of Bogota. The children fell ill after drinking from a local stream, a stream contaminated by the bodies of more than 2,000 people, secretly buried by the Colombian military.

According to the Colombian high command, the mass grave just outside the army base at La Macarena contains the bodies of guerilla fighters killed between 2002 and 2009 in that country’s long-running civil war. But given the army’s involvement in the so-called “false positive” scandal, human rights groups are highly skeptical that the dead are members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia and the National Liberation Army, the two insurgent groups fighting the central government.

“False positive” is the name given to the Colombian armed forces operation that murdered civilians and then dressed them up in insurgent uniforms in order to demonstrate the success of the army’s counterinsurgency strategy, thus winning more aid from the U.S. According to the human rights organizations Comision de Derechos Homanos del Bajo Ariari and Colectivo Orlando Fals Borda, some 2,000 civilians have been murdered under the program.

The bodies at La Macarena have not been identified yet, but suspicion is that they represent victims of the “false-positive” program, as well as rural activists and trade unionists. The incoming Colombian president, Juan Manuel Santos, was defense secretary when the murders were talking place. Santos also oversaw a brief invasion of Ecuador in 2008 that reportedly killed a number of insurgents. The invasion was widely condemned throughout Latin America.

More:
http://www.alternet.org/story/147728/colombian_mass_grave_of_more_than_2000_may_be_civilian_trade_unionists%2C_not_military_casualties



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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #28)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 08:06 AM

29. And we're in charge in all these places? Nope. Check similar pics in Asia & elsewhere we give aid

 

The point being that the US has had little to do with any of these places. Aid is often wasted or corrupted. Look at Africa; its hard to get aid to those who need it because of corruption. So I guess we shouldnt even try?
And VZ will continue to slide until the people awaken to the lies they've been fed. And its coming.

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Response to 7962 (Reply #20)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 09:50 AM

35. Here are some shoppers in Caracas looking for food

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Response to 7962 (Reply #8)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 09:45 AM

33. Poverty rises in Venezuela, according to UN report

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — A new report says that poverty is on the rise in Venezuela and efforts across Latin America to boost incomes are stalling.

The report by the United Nations' regional economic office in Chile says that in Venezuela poverty rose from 25 percent in 2012, to 32 percent in 2013.

Paraguay, El Salvador and Colombia saw the biggest declines in poverty but overall the region showed little progress as economies slowed in the wake of the global financial crisis. The U.N. estimates that 28 percent of Latin Americans, or 167 million people, live in poverty.

As disappointing as the trend may seem, the outlook is worsening for Venezuela and other South America countries struggling to maintain social spending amid a sharp decline in commodity prices, including oil.


http://news.yahoo.com/poverty-rises-venezuela-according-un-report-001622014.html

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 02:05 PM

9. So, they've codified into law what they've been doing for the last year or more. nt

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 02:30 PM

10. Hell, American cops do that all the time: "I feared for my life"

 

And I suspect that some posters on this thread are generally sympathetic to the cops, unless they're Venezuelan ones.

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Response to Comrade Grumpy (Reply #10)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 07:33 PM

18. The OP refers to soldiers

don't know about you, but if I heard the US Secdef authorizing the U.S. military to shoot protesters I would be furious.

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Response to hack89 (Reply #18)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 11:54 PM

23. This isn't about shooting "protesters."

 

It's about soldiers defending their lives if under attack.

What if you heard the US Secdef authorizing the US military to shoot at people shooting at them? Would you be furious then, too?

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Response to Comrade Grumpy (Reply #23)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 09:47 AM

34. I would wonder why the military was in the streets control rooting demonstrators

i would wonder why you don't have police doing police work.

Didn't Kent State teach you anything?

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Response to Comrade Grumpy (Reply #23)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 10:03 AM

36. Except according to Human Rights Watch they have been shooting unarmed protesters.

(see post #31)

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sat Jan 31, 2015, 03:38 PM

11. And who can forget, "Turn that thing off or I will fucking kill you."

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 12:12 AM

25. Chavez falls, US rises in Venezuela.

 

Coup de tat



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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 12:19 AM

26. Bill Would Allow Texas Teachers To Kill Students

Bill Would Allow Texas Teachers To Kill Students
by Carimah Townes Posted on January 29, 2015 at 12:45 pm Updated: January 30, 2015 at 8:57 am

People who are concerned about the use of excessive force by law enforcement may have to deal with another fatal can of worms. If Texas state Rep. Dan Flynn (R) gets his way, teachers will have the right to use deadly force against students in Texas classrooms, in the near future.

The Lone Star State already permits teachers to have firearms in the classroom, but H.B. 868, also known as the Teacher’s Protection Act, would authorize instructors to use “force or deadly force on school property, on a school bus, or at a school-sponsored event in defense of the educator’s person or in defense of students of the school that employs the educator.” Instructors would also have the right to use deadly force “in defense of property of the school that employs the educator.” Moreover, civil immunity would be granted to those who use deadly force, meaning they would not be liable for the injury or death of student.

Such a bill could have disastrous consequences for students of color. A coalition of civil rights organizations found that black and Latino students face much higher rates of disciplinary action in schools, which exacerbates the so-called school-to-prison pipeline. By extension, if students of color are already disproportionately targeted by school authorities for their behavior, they could also become the targets of deadly force used by educators.

Flynn is one of the Lone Star state’s staunchest gun-rights advocates. He previously co-authored legislation to allow firearms on college campuses. In 2013, he successfully co-authored a law that reduced the minimum number of training hours needed for a concealed handgun license.

More:
http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2015/01/29/3617031/deadly-force-in-texas-classrooms/

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Response to EX500rider (Original post)

Sun Feb 1, 2015, 09:00 AM

30. Aren't the police in NYC or somewhere being issued fucking MACHINE GUNS to use at demonstrations?

 

Plus, I cannot think of a situation these days where I would call the police. Looks like they now shoot first and concoct a story later. Although it seems like they can now kill and maim at will, no consequences except maybe a paid leave of absence.

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