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Wed Sep 13, 2017, 10:58 PM

A 58-story skyscraper in San Francisco is tilting and sinking making their apartments worthless

https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/443e7797-49a5-39c4-92ea-f1a925d4cf31/ss_a-58-story-skyscraper-in-san.html

Yahoo News / Business Insider..

Bad news keeps piling up at the "leaning tower" of San Francisco. Millennium Tower is a luxury residential high-rise that has sunk 17 inches and tilted 14 inches since it was completed in 2008. Though an inspection by the city showed it's safe to occupy, the building's wealthy residents take no solace. Their multimillion-dollar condos have tumbled $320,000 in value on average. Here's what we know about the fate of Millennium Tower.

Millennium Tower rises 58 stories above San Francisco's Financial District.

The city's fourth-tallest skyscraper contains over 400 multimillion-dollar condo units. It soars 645 feet, providing residents with panoramic views of the Bay Area... more info..but here is the most important....

But residents weren't happy after learning in June 2015 that the building had sunk 16 inches into the soil and tilted 2 inches at its base.

So far in 2017, Millennium Tower has sunk an additional inch and tilted another 2 1/2 inches toward the massive Salesforce Tower under construction across the street.....(more at link)

24 replies, 2728 views

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Reply A 58-story skyscraper in San Francisco is tilting and sinking making their apartments worthless (Original post)
Stuart G Sep 13 OP
ghostsinthemachine Sep 13 #1
dixiegrrrrl Sep 13 #2
Brother Buzz Sep 13 #5
R B Garr Sep 14 #8
Brother Buzz Sep 14 #10
R B Garr Sep 14 #18
Brother Buzz Sep 14 #19
R B Garr Friday #23
snooper2 Sep 14 #16
jmowreader Friday #24
Binkie The Clown Sep 13 #3
marylandblue Sep 13 #4
NutmegYankee Sep 14 #21
JI7 Sep 14 #6
mulsh Sep 14 #7
dixiegrrrrl Sep 14 #11
WinkyDink Sep 14 #12
mulsh Sep 14 #14
Warpy Sep 14 #9
Javaman Sep 14 #13
tinrobot Sep 14 #15
Tracer Sep 14 #17
MyNameGoesHere Sep 14 #20
hatrack Sep 14 #22

Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Wed Sep 13, 2017, 11:23 PM

1. Yeah, it's a great building, in a great area

But. I think Joe Montana lives on the top floor, or he did anyway. What do the tenants do? The developer?

The lawyers must be salivating at all the possible suits.

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Wed Sep 13, 2017, 11:25 PM

2. Millennium Tower sits on land prone to liquefaction,

the process by which loose sand and silt behave like a liquid in the event of an earthquake. The seismic activity causes water pressure in the sediment to increase and grains of sand to lose contact with each other, according to the US Geological Survey. The soil may give out under large, heavy structures.


Yep....

Too bad they did not set it on bedrock....

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #2)

Wed Sep 13, 2017, 11:45 PM

5. The building is straddling a transition; half is built on crap fill prone to liquefaction

and the other half is on reasonably consolidated fill.

One situation, or the other, the engineers can deal with, but in this case, they totally blew it.

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Response to Brother Buzz (Reply #5)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 12:31 AM

8. That is frightening. Makes you wonder if they might

be condemned or something. Too dangerous to live in.

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Response to R B Garr (Reply #8)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 01:17 AM

10. Crazy, but they are saying there may be a fix, and it could be ultimately straightened....

While the owners continue to reside in the tower.

Millennium Tower keeps on sinking, but there may be a fix

By Matier & Ross Updated 12:24 pm, Wednesday, July 19, 2017

<snip>

The good news for the tower’s well-heeled residents, who paid from $1.6 million to $10 million for their condominiums, is that a pair of engineering firms hired by developer Millennium Partners and other parties involved in the dispute think they have a solution that will stabilize the tower and prop it back upright.

The LERA firm and DeSimone Consulting Engineers say the problem can be remedied by drilling 50 to 100 new piles down to bedrock from the building’s basement. Each pile would be anywhere from 10 inches to a foot in diameter.

<more>

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Millennium-Tower-keeps-on-sinking-but-there-may-11297935.php

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Response to Brother Buzz (Reply #10)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 03:06 PM

18. Thanks for the link! That still sounds like an awfully scary fix -- drilling more

pilings from the basement. I guess that's why they need two engineering firms for this because of the check and balances getting it right. I still would be scared to live there. Imagine riding the elevators, etc.

I see where Joe Montana sued the building's developers. What an awful and scary mess.

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Response to R B Garr (Reply #18)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 03:24 PM

19. There are many lawsuits, but Montana's is interesting

Joe Montana helped promote the tower in 2010 in exchange for residency, which means he could be on the hook for lawsuits himself. He promoted the tower while management know of the problems, yet didn't tell him. He's kinda pissed because his reputation is on the line.

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Response to Brother Buzz (Reply #19)

Fri Sep 15, 2017, 02:17 AM

23. Interesting situation! It would seem liability might

extend to the City, as well, for approving construction on that ground. Though other surrounding buildings aren't in jeopardy, it seems. I sure can see why buyers were initially attracted to a high rise with those views, but how scary it's turned out to be.

Edit, I remember seeing a show (I think like Huell Howser or something like that) that showed how that area/land was built up and marveled at it, but it obviously has its downsides.

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Response to Brother Buzz (Reply #5)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 11:00 AM

16. I can fix it, will only cost me a couple thousand but I'm going have to charge 2 million

just because LOL




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Response to snooper2 (Reply #16)

Fri Sep 15, 2017, 03:08 AM

24. I slightly suspect that won't work

Polyurethane foam is a good product for raising a slab...but I don't think it'll pick up a 60-story building.

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Wed Sep 13, 2017, 11:28 PM

3. Yikes! 17 inches? That's huge.

A lot of San Fransisco is built on the rubble of the earthquake that was just pushed into the bay and used as fill to create new "land".

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Wed Sep 13, 2017, 11:37 PM

4. This is an engineering error

The building designer has to submit soil reports to city plan checkers showing that the soil can support the building. The designer made a mistake and the plan checkers didn't catch it.

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Response to marylandblue (Reply #4)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 03:43 PM

21. It should have had pilings down to bedrock, but that likely cost too much.

It's a major reason that you don't see many tall buildings in the US Southeast coast. Sandy soil with bedrock very deep below. In Norfolk, VA, it can be 7000 feet down.

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 12:10 AM

6. i don't feel bad since they are wealthy

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 12:22 AM

7. In SF's early days these parcels were called "Water Lots" part of the wonderful history of the

liberal free market at work in all its glory. A great deal of the eastern shore of SF is built on these lots.


Here's an article with maps about water lots in the area where the Millennium Tower was built.

[link:http://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=WATER_LOT_SPECULATION|

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Response to mulsh (Reply #7)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 01:25 AM

11. Miami is another example of water lots.

People talk of buying land by the gallon in So. Fla., because the "bedrock" is porous limestone, and water flows in and out of that.
And it goes UP with rising sea levels..into the streets.

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Response to mulsh (Reply #7)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 01:42 AM

12. I think you mean "Conservative free market." Just so as not to confuse.

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Response to WinkyDink (Reply #12)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 10:26 AM

14. I'm too used to using the term "liberal free market" to piss off conservatives. For some reason the

term seems to upset hardcore free market fetishists, especially when they're bad mouthing liberals.

It's mostly the correct economics term but then so are terms like grifter, con artists or the archaic "flim-flam man".

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 12:35 AM

9. I read about it when people were first starting to move in

There is no way I can think of to shore up something that big. Had they caught the mistake (and I'm being generous) there might have been a way.

Eventually doors and windows will no longer fit, windows will start to crack and fall, and the damned thing will be unsafe and have to be demolished.

I do feel a bit sorry for people who spent everything they had to buy into the place, some undoubtedly in the hope that the profit in a few years would allow them to buy an ordinary bungalow in Silicon Valley, where their jobs were. California is nuts.

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 10:19 AM

13. this is going to turn into a massive lawsuit against the civil engineer.

someone completely fucked up on the geo-engineering report.

I work in this industry and I have seen lawsuits like this.

they are not pretty.

this is a massive fuck up.

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 10:37 AM

15. I wonder what happens to that building in an earthquake.

Does it completely tip over?

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 11:04 AM

17. Maybe someday the building will look like this:

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 03:37 PM

20. Over 400 multimillion dollar condos.

Close it down and let it be the American version of the fine tower at Pisa. That one can be blamed on lack of engineering skills at the time, this one can be a monument to greed.

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Thu Sep 14, 2017, 04:12 PM

22. "So I built a third one. That burned down, fell over, THEN sank into the swamp . . . "

"But the fourth one stayed up!"

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