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Sun Sep 3, 2017, 10:24 AM

POLICE CHIEF THANKS UTAH NURSE FOR STANDING FIRM

RIGBY — On July 26 of this year, one of our reserve officers, William Gray, was the victim in a horrific accident in northern Utah while working his full-time job as a truck driver.

The suspect in this incident was fleeing from Utah State Highway Patrol, when he crossed into oncoming traffic and collided head on with Gray’s truck, severely injuring Gray and killing himself. Officer Gray was flown to the University of Utah’s burn unit where he remains under their watchful, professional, and competent care.

Within the first hours of Officer Gray being admitted into the burn unit, an incident occurred between hospital staff and an officer from an agency in Utah who was assisting with the investigation.

The Rigby Police Department was not aware of this incident until Aug. 31, 2017.

The Rigby Police Department would like to thank the nurse involved and hospital staff for standing firm and protecting Officer Gray’s rights as a patient and victim. Protecting the rights of others is truly a heroic act.

https://www.eastidahonews.com/2017/09/rigby-police-chief-thanks-nurse-for-standing-firm-in-protecting-officers-rights/

29 replies, 4939 views

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Arrow 29 replies Author Time Post
Reply POLICE CHIEF THANKS UTAH NURSE FOR STANDING FIRM (Original post)
HAB911 Sep 2017 OP
tonyt53 Sep 2017 #1
Brother Buzz Sep 2017 #2
shraby Sep 2017 #3
Brother Buzz Sep 2017 #7
enough Sep 2017 #8
yardwork Sep 2017 #16
onetexan Sep 2017 #22
cos dem Sep 2017 #5
mjvpi Sep 2017 #12
HAB911 Sep 2017 #4
cos dem Sep 2017 #6
KT2000 Sep 2017 #9
Phoenix61 Sep 2017 #10
wryter2000 Sep 2017 #28
33taw Sep 2017 #11
Baconator Sep 2017 #21
Hassin Bin Sober Sep 2017 #23
33taw Sep 2017 #24
Baconator Sep 2017 #25
irisblue Sep 2017 #26
33taw Sep 2017 #29
Gore1FL Sep 2017 #15
orangecrush Sep 2017 #17
MrPurple Sep 2017 #20
WinkyDink Sep 2017 #13
orangecrush Sep 2017 #18
irisblue Sep 2017 #27
L. Coyote Sep 2017 #14
tblue37 Sep 2017 #19

Response to HAB911 (Original post)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 10:35 AM

1. Glad he said this, but actions speak louder than words.

 

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Response to tonyt53 (Reply #1)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 10:41 AM

2. What actions do you suggest the police chief should do?

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Response to Brother Buzz (Reply #2)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 10:44 AM

3. Fire the recalcitrant officer who violated the nurse's rights.

The office obviously hasn't got a modicum of self control. This action he took was against the nurse who was within her rights to deny him compliance. What do you think he would do with someone who defied him who WAS in the wrong? Hmmmmm?

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Response to shraby (Reply #3)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 10:49 AM

7. The police chief from Rigby, Idaho can't fire anyone in Utah

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Response to shraby (Reply #3)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 10:53 AM

8. The Rigby Police Chief can't fire the offending officer because the officer

is a member of an entirely different police force.

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Response to shraby (Reply #3)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:37 AM

16. You didn't read this article, did you?

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Response to shraby (Reply #3)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 12:38 PM

22. if they don't fire the SOB cop who got rough with her, the nurse should sue his pants off

and the department.

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Response to tonyt53 (Reply #1)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 10:45 AM

5. I believe it was Salt Lake City police that committed the assault.

I'm assuming Rigby Police are not part of SLC, and thus had no involvement. So the letter may be the only "action" they can really take at this point.

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Response to tonyt53 (Reply #1)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:25 AM

12. This should help her sue the Salt Lake Police Department and the university of Utah police

for allowing the assault and false arrest of this brave woman. It's a good thing that she had white skin or this could have been really ugly.

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Response to HAB911 (Original post)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 10:44 AM

4. SLC police arrested Nurse Wubbels

for trying to protect a patient. That patient was a reserve officer in ID—His dept. thanked Nurse Wubbles.



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Response to HAB911 (Reply #4)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 10:46 AM

6. Ah, Rigby is in ID. Clearly not part of SLC.

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Response to HAB911 (Original post)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:08 AM

9. So - why did he want his blood?

the patient was the victim not the suspect.

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Response to KT2000 (Reply #9)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:17 AM

10. To prove he wasn't under the influence of

anything. That way he couldn't be held responsible for the accident. If your DUI even if the wreck isn't your fault it could be said you didn't do enough to avoid the wreck.

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Response to Phoenix61 (Reply #10)

Mon Sep 4, 2017, 04:29 PM

28. They probably could have gotten a court order

Then taking his blood would have been legal. I'll bet he would have consented if he'd been able.

The nurse did exactly the right thing, and I hope she makes a bundle in the lawsuit.

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Response to KT2000 (Reply #9)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:21 AM

11. I think they wanted to protect the victim by showing he was not under the influence of drugs or alc.

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Response to 33taw (Reply #11)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 12:18 PM

21. If by protect... You mean reduce the departments civil liability...

Honestly, I'm not sure if you're serious.

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Response to Baconator (Reply #21)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 12:52 PM

23. Bingo.

And this is why the Nurse has an obligation to sue the cops. And not settle.

I sure would like to hear any radio traffic or conversations caught on dash cams discussing why the cops needed to get blood from a VICTIM.

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Response to Baconator (Reply #21)

Mon Sep 4, 2017, 02:55 PM

24. Completely serious. I am not a legal expert, but this is a complex situation.

The police were pursuing a suspect who had a crash with the truck driver/part-time police officer. The suspect died and the truck driver was seriously injured. If the victim was under the influence of any drugs or alcohol his/her claims become very different. The police department's responsibility in having any responsibility in the crash also changes. I believe the police were protecting themselves as much as the victim. They did not have probable cause to take his blood, so they tried to bully the nurse.

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Response to 33taw (Reply #24)

Mon Sep 4, 2017, 02:59 PM

25. I think we agree...

... except on the point that the attempted blood draw was intended to be to the benefit of the victim in any way.

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Response to 33taw (Reply #24)

Mon Sep 4, 2017, 03:14 PM

26. why didn't the SLC LEO get a warrant?

¬¬for the record, my knowledge of getting a warrant is from tv shows.ฯฯ
The arresting officer's supervisor talks to a DA, DA goes to a judge, judge says yes or no. Why didn't this happen, it's common enough. There are at least 4 layers of personnel besides the RN & the hospital admins & lawyer.
So why,again, wasn't there a warrant?

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Response to irisblue (Reply #26)

Mon Sep 4, 2017, 04:31 PM

29. They did not have probable cause to believe a crime had been committed.

Therefore, the police had no grounds to ask for a warrant. Also, since it was an active situation - they could have arrested him pending charges - but again, there was no cause for arrest. It is hard to tell if they were protecting themselves because of their actions surrounding the accident or the part-time police officer - or both.

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Response to KT2000 (Reply #9)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:34 AM

15. The excuse was to prove innocence...

...because apparently that presumption doesn't exist anymore unless they first violate your 4th Amendment rights.

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Response to KT2000 (Reply #9)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:39 AM

17. If they could find drugs or alcohol

In the victims blood, it could be used as evidence against him if he tried to sue the Utah Highway Patrol for being injured as a result of their high speed chase.

CYA.

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Response to orangecrush (Reply #17)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 12:16 PM

20. It's totally cover your ass - they were trying to protect the cops from the chase from liability

I doubt they'd go to this trouble to get the blood of a random victim, if the police weren't involved in the chase that caused the crash.

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Response to HAB911 (Original post)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:30 AM

13. Uh....WTH???????? The victim wouldn't need to prove sobriety! The ACCUSERS would have to prove DUI!

 

Stupid thug cop.

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Response to WinkyDink (Reply #13)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:40 AM

18. See post 17.

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Response to WinkyDink (Reply #13)

Mon Sep 4, 2017, 03:26 PM

27. according to the article, the suspect was killed, her/his autopsy would include blood work

for drugs and ETOH. So why did the SLC cop want blood work from the unconscious vic? I am still not seeing a rationale for that.

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Response to HAB911 (Original post)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 11:32 AM

14. K & R

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Response to HAB911 (Original post)

Sun Sep 3, 2017, 12:01 PM

19. The cops were hoping to find drugs or alcohol in the INNOCENT VICTIM'S blood,

because they might be able to use that to reduce their liability for the accident that injured him and killed the guy they were chasing.

I would also like to know what the guy they were chasing was suspected of. If it was a traffic violation or something that did not rise to a life or death level, then there was no excuse for conducting a high speed chase in traffic. A friend of my son's died at age 18 in 1998 because he was pursued at high speeds through residential areas at 2:00 a.m.

The cops had no probable cause for going after him in the first place. He was just dropping a friend off at his apartment after a night spent celebrating the friend's 20th birthday. But the 20-year-old friend and the 18-year-old driver both had been drinking beer, and there was a 6-pack in the car. The driver was afraid of getting an MIP, so when the cops, who were in the parking lot of the apartment complex, flashed their lights at him, he panicked and drove away with the other boy still in the car, instead of dropping him off.

The cops turned on their siren and went after him, even though as far as they knew, he had done nothing in the first place except for pulling into the parking lot of an apartment building to drop someone off. They were just fishing for something when they flashed their lights, but when he drove away--initially at a normal speed--that gave them an excuse to pursue him.

He crested a hill--again, in a residential area--at speeds well over 100mph, went airborne, and knocked over a traffic sign before wrapping his car around a tree and breaking his neck. He died on impact, and the other boy, who thank goodness was wearing a seatbelt, ended up with dozens of stitches. My son, who was the passenger's roommate but had skipped the birthday celebration because he was studying for an exam, was called to the hospital, and he called me to go with him because he was too shaken to drive.

I saw the car the next day. It was crumpled like a piece of paper. If my son had been with them he would certainly have been killed, too, even though he would have worn a seatbelt, because he would have been sitting behind the driver, and that part of the car was completely crushed.

There was no excuse for the cops to conduct a high speed chase through town that night. Yes, the boys were guilty of underage drinking, and yes, the driver probably had a BAC higher than legally allowed. It was stupid and wrong for him to be driving after drinking. But he did not deserve to die for it, and I still get rather freaked out when I think of how easily my son could have been killed in that crash if he had been a little less focused on acing the test he had coming up that Monday.

Cops get all excited when they start chasing someone. It's an adrenaline high, and some look for excuses to give chase. Justifications for high speed chases should be strictly limited to life and death circumstances, but unfortunately they often are conducted for ridiculous reasons.

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