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Wed Jun 29, 2016, 02:25 AM

The New York Daily News: Homo Nest Raided, Queen Bees Are Stinging Mad

She sat there with her legs crossed, the lashes of her mascara-coated eyes beating like the wings of a hummingbird. She was angry. She was so upset she hadn't bothered to shave. A day old stubble was beginning to push through the pancake makeup. She was a he. A queen of Christopher Street.

Last weekend the queens had turned commandos and stood bra strap to bra strap against an invasion of the helmeted Tactical Patrol Force. The elite police squad had shut down one of their private gay clubs, the Stonewall Inn at 57 Christopher St., in the heart of a three-block homosexual community in Greenwich Village. Queen Power reared its bleached blonde head in revolt. New York City experienced its first homosexual riot. "We may have lost the battle, sweets, but the war is far from over," lisped an unofficial lady-in-waiting from the court of the Queens.

"We've had all we can take from the Gestapo," the spokesman, or spokeswoman, continued. "We're putting our foot down once and for all." The foot wore a spiked heel. According to reports, the Stonewall Inn, a two-story structure with a sand painted brick and opaque glass facade, was a mecca for the homosexual element in the village who wanted nothing but a private little place where they could congregate, drink, dance and do whatever little girls do when they get together.

The thick glass shut out the outside world of the street. Inside, the Stonewall bathed in wild, bright psychedelic lights, while the patrons writhed to the sounds of a juke box on a square dance floor surrounded by booths and tables. The bar did a good business and the waiters, or waitresses, were always kept busy, as they snaked their way around the dancing customers to the booths and tables. For nearly two years, peace and tranquility reigned supreme for the Alice in Wonderland clientele.

more...


The article above describes something which happened 47 years ago and demonstrates how the GLBT community was referred to and reported on in the media. Forty-seven years ago, yesterday, June 28th, the modern American GLBT rights movement was birthed. It was a raid on the Stonewall Inn in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City. GLBT people finally had enough of police harassment and responded. We have come a long way in 47 years and we still have a ways to go.

We have seen tragedy from the most recent hate crime in Orlando two weeks ago on a GLBT nightclub, killing 49 and injuring 53 more to the scourge of AIDS and the failure of the US to respond with anything other than indifference, at best, and bigotry, at worst, even from the office of the US president. We have seen indifference and expectations of compromise to our civil rights struggle with legislation like "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" (DADT) and the FDA restrictions on blood donations. But, we have also seen fantastic leaps forward in regards to our civil rights such as Lawrence_v._Texas which invalidated all sodomy laws in the US making sexual activity between people of the same sex legal and not subject to harassment for consensual sexual activity a privilege already enjoyed by non-gay people, and just one year ago, the Supreme Court granted marriage equality with Obergefell_v._Hodges.

There are still injustices and areas which need to be addressed to further our civil rights as citizens of the US. There are states where it is legal to fire people for being GLBT; states where it is legal to deny housing to LGBT people; states which do not record hate crimes against the GLBT (and we still rank as the third highest of victimized groups). There are places where people are actively trying to deny us rights we have already achieved, meaning we have to fight some of the same fights. Parental rights and adoption issues are also still contentious in many states and locales. Homophobia and heterosexism are still lurking about in media, public discourse, and legal areas.

We have come a long way, but the struggle continues and it all started with those brave individuals who finally said "NO MORE!" and stood up for their rights! There is a reason June is GLBT pride month, and it is because of the Stonewall Inn Riots; a place now made into a national monument, as of a few days ago. As June ends, it is important to know why this is pride month and this is why many of us, GLBT and our allies, march in June!

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Reply The New York Daily News: Homo Nest Raided, Queen Bees Are Stinging Mad (Original post)
Behind the Aegis Jun 2016 OP
Hekate Jun 2016 #1
Behind the Aegis Jun 2016 #6
Monk06 Jun 2016 #13
pnwmom Jun 2016 #2
LeftofObama Jun 2016 #3
surrealAmerican Jun 2016 #4
Exilednight Jun 2016 #5
gratuitous Jun 2016 #7
ismnotwasm Jun 2016 #8
Solly Mack Jun 2016 #9
raven mad Jun 2016 #10
mulsh Jun 2016 #11
Behind the Aegis Jun 2016 #12

Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 03:54 AM

1. "Whatever little girls do": amazing the intersection of misogyny & homophobia running thru the essay

Just an observation from straight grandma, about how attitudes like this coming from those in power (straight males) served to keep us all in our places from the time we were children on through our adulthood.

I say this because I could feel my hackles rise, my stomach churn -- every goddam word is a putdown of anyone who is not male, straight, adult, and needless to say, white.

Times have changed for the better -- not nearly enough yet, but they have changed. Thanks for this stark reminder.

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Response to Hekate (Reply #1)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 01:32 PM

6. It is often the case we see such intersections.

What I find interesting, as well as mystifying, is often the derogatory language directed at lesbians is usually male-oriented, but still considered misogyny. It really comes down to gender roles and how they are defined or not. When I was doing presentations on GLBT issues, I would often find articles like the one in the OP, though usually not as laden with insults in that manner.

We have come a long way, but there is still quite a bit that needs to be addressed. I wanted to post this as a reminder of where we were, and where we need to go. I don't think bigotry will ever be eradicated, but there are certainly steps which can be taken to remove such bigotry from our laws, but people have to be aware they even exist, and that is the first step.

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Response to Hekate (Reply #1)

Thu Jun 30, 2016, 06:30 PM

13. What gets me is the tone suggesting the trans girls were a pushover Throwing lipsticks?

Not likely

My brother in law was a heavy equipment operator for 30 years before he became Francine He also went to the worst school in our city for gangs of racist and gay bashing greasers So he learned how to fight really well In fact he was downright deadly when he was in his twenties

Francine lives in Puerto Vallarta now and has been mugged twice while there On poor perp ended up with three broken ribs and a deep hole in his foot from a spiked heel

She carries a can of mace and a three sided allan wrench I used on my bicycle

?c=2

Makes a handy ninja star puncture weapon that is not classed as a weapon but works

Transphobies be warned, be nice to the ladies if you don't want to get the shit kicked out of you by someone who has been abused all her life. The trannies I know can take a punch and bring it back just as hard

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 04:13 AM

2. Sadly, I think the rate of change started speeding up in the early 1980's --

with the AIDS epidemic.

That's when my parents split up and my father came out. Many of his friends, too. So many people were dying then. Things had to change.

He outlived most of his friends, but he's gone now. I wish he'd lived to see marriage equality become a reality.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 06:01 AM

3. Bookmarking to read later.

Thanks for posting this!

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 06:58 AM

4. I wonder what commonly held attitudes today ...

... will sound every bit as cruel and stupid in forty years.

Those words must have been within the mainstream to make it into the Daily News at the time.

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Response to surrealAmerican (Reply #4)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 07:24 AM

5. That's an interesting question you ask. With the evolution of

The internet giving a platform to anyone with an opinion to write something that will last for centuries to come, there is no shortage of material.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 02:33 PM

7. I was in a little discussion yesterday

After the other person had painted herself into a corner, she suddenly terminated her participation (Facebook isn't the proper venue for such a discussion, it's very complicated, yadda yadda yadda) in a wordy farewell. One of her complaints was that she had been called names (not in the discussion at hand) and her heart had been judged. The implication was that those slings and arrows were the equivalent - or perhaps even worse - than anything GLBT people had been subjected to over the years.

I decided to let my correspondent flounce off without taking the last word for myself, but a little reminder of what the Daily News wrote all those years ago, might be a good antidote to the bigots' butthurt. And perhaps as bad as anything? I'd bet a nickel that the folks at the Daily News when this article was published felt it was an even-handed, objective, and respectful account.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 02:56 PM

8. K&R

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 02:58 PM

9. K&R

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 08:49 PM

10. My mom became a GLB supporter (T wasn't known then) during WWII.

Dad was serving, and mom had two neighbors who'd been together 20 or so years; older, they weren't "eligible" to serve. So they helped the families of the men and women who did.

I was lucky - she raised us right.



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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 10:36 PM

11. Before Stonewall, SF, 1966 there was Compton's Cafeteria...

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Response to mulsh (Reply #11)

Thu Jun 30, 2016, 12:29 AM

12. That was on a smaller scale but certainly important.

I can honestly say I knew nothing about it until about a couple of years ago when I saw a documentary on it. It is called "Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton's Cafeteria" and it is still showing on Netflix and it was shown on NPR (so, if you have a NPR app you may be able to find it there too).

Thank you for adding that piece of GLBT history!! This August will be the 50th anniversary! I hope I remember so I can do a post...or you can, if you'd like!

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