HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » American education fails ...

Sun Jan 4, 2015, 10:27 PM

American education fails to teach us anything about American history.

We are taught to read and write and it's up to us to learn the rest.

"The Warmth of Other Suns" by Isabel Wilkerson and published in 2010, is about the great migration of millions of African Americans from the South to the North.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/01/04/1353063/--The-Warmth-of-Other-Suns-a-review?showAll=yes

It is a huge story, taking place over great distances, large groups of people and decades of time. And that is perhaps why it is not usually told as a single narrative. Wilkerson uses the journeys of three individuals, from different decades, traveling from different origins to different destinations, to examine this largest of all internal migrations that the country had ever seen.
It was a leaderless movement of people who were tired of endless restrictions on their right to vote, to own and farm their own land; people who were tired of poor education and even poorer futures for their children. Surely, they must have been tired of their own vulnerability to Jim Crow laws that put the distance between the rest of their lives and the end of a rope in the hands of a white man who took offense at a few words spoken to a white woman.

Just as it was a war that ended the slave labor camps, it was another war that allowed so many to escape from what had become a virtual slavery in the South. World War I cut off the flow of immigrant labor from Europe upon which the industrial cities of the North relied. Word trickled down to the sharecroppers and the migrant agricultural workers and the domestics of the South and some of them left behind all they knew for a chance in the new world.

The fact that they would be facing much of the same racism and hate that they were leaving was probably unknown to many. They would at least be living in a place that did not require them to step off a sidewalk to let a white pass by, or to use a designated doorway, stairwell, or water fountain.

Isabel Wilkerson does not ignore the broader historic picture that she is painting:

The disparity in pay, reported without apology in the local papers for all to see, would have far-reaching effects. It would mean that even the most promising of colored people, having received next to nothing in material assets from their slave foreparents, had to labor with the knowledge that they were now being underpaid by more than half, that they were so behind it would be all but impossible to accumulate the assets their white counterparts could, and that they would, by definition, have less to leave succeeding generations than similar white families. Multiplied over the generations, it would mean a wealth deficit between the races that would require a miracle windfall or near asceticism on the part of colored families if they were to have any chance of catching up or amassing anything of value. Otherwise, the chasm would continue, as it did for blacks as a group even into the succeeding century. The layers of accumulated assets built up by the better-paid dominant caste, generation after generation, would factor into a wealth disparity of white Americans having an average net worth ten times that of black Americans by the turn of the twenty-first century, dampening the economic prospects of the children and grandchildren of both Jim Crow and the Great Migration before they were even born.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/01/04/1353063/--The-Warmth-of-Other-Suns-a-review?showAll=yes

We will never fix America until we recognize and acknowledge how we got here.

49 replies, 7127 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 49 replies Author Time Post
Reply American education fails to teach us anything about American history. (Original post)
mountain grammy Jan 2015 OP
daleanime Jan 2015 #1
blkmusclmachine Jan 2015 #2
Recursion Jan 2015 #6
JustAnotherGen Jan 2015 #14
Recursion Jan 2015 #3
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #4
chervilant Jan 2015 #5
midnight Jan 2015 #7
liberal_at_heart Jan 2015 #8
LuvNewcastle Jan 2015 #12
JDPriestly Jan 2015 #9
ErikJ Jan 2015 #10
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #11
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #13
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #21
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #24
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #27
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #33
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #44
liberal_at_heart Jan 2015 #23
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #25
liberal_at_heart Jan 2015 #26
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #28
marmar Jan 2015 #15
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #16
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #22
alcibiades_mystery Jan 2015 #17
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #18
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #29
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #34
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #45
Manifestor_of_Light Jan 2015 #19
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #20
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #30
Manifestor_of_Light Jan 2015 #32
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #35
Manifestor_of_Light Jan 2015 #37
Posteritatis Jan 2015 #31
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #36
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #46
hunter Jan 2015 #38
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #39
LWolf Jan 2015 #40
mountain grammy Jan 2015 #41
LWolf Jan 2015 #47
liberal_at_heart Jan 2015 #42
LWolf Jan 2015 #48
knitter4democracy Jan 2015 #43
LWolf Jan 2015 #49

Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Sun Jan 4, 2015, 10:32 PM

1. K&R....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Sun Jan 4, 2015, 10:51 PM

2. Keep 'em dumb, and pliable for exploitation. That's the 1%'ers way.

 

Race to the "top"

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blkmusclmachine (Reply #2)

Sun Jan 4, 2015, 11:38 PM

6. That's another side effect of the Great Migration: it siphoned off 90%

of the educated African Americans from the South -- Wilkerson shows that the Migrators had higher average educational attainment than the whites in the northern and western cities they moved to. The South to this day economically suffers from that brain and skills drain.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #6)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 10:18 AM

14. Very good point

Even the very tail end migrators - the level of education leaving for the great lakes and north east was astounding.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Sun Jan 4, 2015, 10:52 PM

3. Loved that book

The person-miles traveled in the Great Migration exceed the person-miles traveled by European immigrants to the US during that period. That's astounding.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #3)

Sun Jan 4, 2015, 11:31 PM

4. Yes it is astounding.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Sun Jan 4, 2015, 11:35 PM

5. And here in Harrison, AR

the KKK has purchased another racist billboard... It's astonishing to me that so many people know so little and hate so much.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Sun Jan 4, 2015, 11:44 PM

7. Labor History is importantů Here is an interesting time line that shows us how we got here.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 12:00 AM

8. Too often they try to cram too much into the curriculum. There is no time to go into any

detail or do critical thinking to analyze what they have learned. Just a quick side note and then on to the next bit of history.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to liberal_at_heart (Reply #8)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 01:10 AM

12. I agree.

I think it would be ideal to spend an entire year on a certain section of American history, beginning with the Indians crossing the land bridge from Asia, and successively teaching other sections until you get to the present time in high school. That way, the students could learn detailed information and have discussions about one era to the next. It always seemed to me that there wasn't any organization to learning history in school.

We would rush through a book and facts would be thrown at us to be regurgitated on fill-in-the-blank tests or, even worse, multiple choice. There was a little discussion in class of opinions about different parts, but I never wrote essays about my opinions or impressions in history classes until I went to college. That's almost too late. The kids need to have a good command of the facts starting at an early age, and they should start organizing their thoughts into sentences, paragraphs, essays, and papers as soon as they learn to write.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 12:13 AM

9. Sounds like a good book. Thanks for posting.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 12:15 AM

10. Hell, half Americans dont know who won Civil War or who USA's VP is.

 

Is there any hope?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 12:17 AM

11. I sincerely disagree with that assessment.

The history teachers I have worked with for the last several years have all taught that time in history and had students research various aspects of that and other diasporas within our borders.

Yes, there are history teachers who focus on what is on the tests and nothing else, but most these days have the students research what it was like for the average person in each time period, try to present everything as fairly as they can with their biased textbooks (that they are required to use, by the way), and cover history in as engaging a manner as they can.

I teach Spanish, so I cover the parts of Latin American history most history teachers don't have time for, and at least half the time, my students tell me that they knew that already, that they'd learned it in their history classes. If you have a problem with the required curricula, please complain to your state ed dept. If you have a problem with textbooks, please go when your school board approves the next set.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to knitter4democracy (Reply #11)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 10:15 AM

13. I honestly wasn't blaming teachers here..

Public school teachers do what they can and most are far better than we even deserve. I have attended school board meetings over the years regarding curriculum and have advocated for more civics, current events and history courses. Civics is unheard of these days, but budget and time constraints are the usual response. I even ran for a school board seat once, but lost.
My daughter's school history education was nearly non existent. We live in a small, rural area and American history has been hijacked by our right wing board of ed. She learned "patriotic American history" in school and real history at home.

I have a picture of Karl Marx in my den. One of my daughter's friends looked at the picture and asked who's that? Karl Marx, I replied, totally unprepared for the next who's that? 6 high school grads, from the same school, 3 in college, and the only one who knew about Karl Marx was my daughter, and she didn't learn it in school. I realize Marx wasn't an American, but his name sure comes up a lot with American politicians.





























Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Reply #13)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 04:34 PM

21. Sorry, but you might want to re-read your post, then.

You clearly blame the teachers and make several sweeping generalizations about how American history teachers throughout the US supposedly aren't teaching real US history. You continue to do so after saying that you don't in this most recent post. Taking your experience and applying it to the entire US is a bit much.

I'm sorry if I am coming across too strongly, but all of us teachers are getting tired of this meme, that we're inept, that we don't rise above bad standards and teach it the way it "should" be taught when, in reality, test scores are the highest in American history as are graduation rates, and especially in this area, American history teachers are doing a better job than ever when they have a harder time than ever.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to knitter4democracy (Reply #21)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 06:08 PM

24. Sorry, but given the current state of our country

I think education is severely lacking. Test scores? Really? What's on the test?

Big controversy in Colorado last year when a conservative school district wanted to change the American history curriculum. To their credit, students and teachers walked out in protest, but the school board was doing what they were elected to do.

I never said teachers were inept, those are your words.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Reply #24)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 09:21 PM

27. You might want to read up on things a bit more.

You're parroting the right-wing, profiteering agenda rather well. Start with Madfloridian's posts here--very informative. The Education group is helpful, too.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to knitter4democracy (Reply #27)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 10:21 PM

33. No, I think the right wing profiteering agenda is the reason Americans

aren't getting a real education. I think you're reading me wrong. but I really don't care.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Reply #33)

Wed Jan 7, 2015, 12:07 AM

44. And that is sad.

Please consider going to school board meetings, though, and speaking up for the teachers doing their best to do the right thing.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to knitter4democracy (Reply #11)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 04:53 PM

23. The teachers are great. It is the curriculum that isn't so great. Unfortunately teachers don't get

much say in that matter.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to liberal_at_heart (Reply #23)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 09:08 PM

25. Depends on the school, but yeah, that's the problem.

If you have tenure, you can ignore it and do what you know you need to do, but if you don't, you don't have a choice.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to knitter4democracy (Reply #25)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 09:20 PM

26. and now that Republicans have weakened teacher unions with Democrats being complicit in it,

tenure is disappearing.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to liberal_at_heart (Reply #26)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 09:22 PM

28. It's gone in Michigan.

We're losing so many hard-won rights. It's disgusting.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 10:33 AM

15. I just remember my US history class in high school ......

Virtuous European settlers overcame those savage Indians
Founding fathers were wonderful men
Better dead than Red
Women and People of Color had a few moments, but really aren't that important

.......... I knew it was all bullshit even then, in the late 1980s, but once I got to college, started doing my own research and learned actual American history, I just got mad about it all.


We need more Howard Zinn, and less Prentice Hall.






Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to marmar (Reply #15)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 10:34 AM

16. Amen!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to marmar (Reply #15)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 04:42 PM

22. I remember mine: totally the opposite.

Problematic Europeans come over in waves, kill off millions through disease and ethnic cleansing. The Founding Fathers were not perfect, but they were a product of the Enlightenment. Women and People of Color were the backbone of our economy through Wall Street starting as a slave market and women's unpaid labor as well.

We had a "normal" textbook, but my teacher went above and beyond. I have worked with history teacher colleagues who have gone above and beyond, ignored textbook guidelines when needed, and have had students really get into history in innovative ways.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 10:43 AM

17. I learned about the Great Migration in high school

 

We read about it in American History class, and we also discussed it in English class (when reading parts of Ellison, Baldwin, and Morrison). This was in NYC in the late 1980's/early 1990's.

I'm convinced that a lot of people just don't pay much attention in school, but that's not really a problem of curriculum.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to alcibiades_mystery (Reply #17)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 10:50 AM

18. You are in the minority.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Reply #18)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 09:27 PM

29. What is your proof for this statement?

Per the CCSS, you need to have facts to back up that kind of opinion (9-10.W.1B, 9-10.W.2B, 9-10.W.9).

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink



Response to mountain grammy (Reply #34)

Wed Jan 7, 2015, 12:24 AM

45. There are some issues, yes.

You admit that you are using your own personal bias in this regard, and you are not a recent graduate. Keep in mind that, in education, a source five years old or older is often considered out-of-date because the standards have changed and much has happened in just the last couple of years.

Source #1 is from 2009. The study is from ISI, a well-known right-wing group trying to prove that colleges and universities are too liberal.

Source #2 is from 2013. That is better, but then there's the issue of the article being based entirely on polling. The very first poll the author cites is 2 years old and from a biased source. Polls are amazingly easy to swing one way or another.

Source #3 is from 2011 and clearly states that the test scores haven't varied widely for years despite different groups of students taking it. Given the serious rise in test scores in other areas, this makes me question the test. Remember, too, this source is basing the entire argument on the results of one test. Normally, educators aren't okay with that sort of thing, but it's common in the media since it makes for a good story.

Source #4 is from Trinity University, not exactly an unbiased source when it comes to "pure" American history, and it's undated. The first study cited and dealt with in the essay is from 1993. The second (after discussing C.S. Lewis and "The Screwtape Letters" is from 1988 and is based only on 200 questionaires done by college students at two universities in Texas. That's it. That's all the research cited.

So, two of the four citations are from right-wing groups with serious biases when it comes to history (in fact, in direct opposition to the history you advocate being taught), and the other two are based on flimsy evidence.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 02:53 PM

19. If you want to know why history that is taught is boring, read:

LIES MY TEACHER TOLD ME, by James Loewen. Basically he says that events are described in the third person, as if the causes are not known, in order to not offend any particular group, as if uprisings come out of nowhere and have no causes.

He also wrote LIES ACROSS AMERICA about biased Civil War and other historical plaques. And a textbook about Mississippi history that was upheld as accurate by the Federal Court of the Northern District of Mississippi (Loewen v. Turnipseed). And a book called "Sundown Towns".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_W._Loewen

And also read A PEOPLE'S HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES by Howard Zinn and A DIFFERENT MIRROR by Ronald Takaki.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Different_Mirror

OVERVIEW from Wikipedia:
It deals with the subject of minority perspectives of multicultural America, incorporating quotes, folk songs, letters, telegrams, and photographs into the text. It deals with, in roughly sequential order, Native Americans, African-Americans pre- and post-slavery era, Irish, Mexicans, Chicanos, Chinese, Japanese, Jews, and ties up the book with a current (for the time the book was written) summary of where minorities are now. Each chapter talks about the history of a different ethnic group, and covers over a period of time public attitudes towards the minority, public policy, laws for or against the minority, and attitude of the minority towards their situation. Several groups are revisited at multiple points through their history.

One theme going throughout the entire book is the 'us against them' attitude that the ruling structure has towards the minorities, from the fear of the "giddy multitude" in colonial times, to the Chinese Exclusion Act being created to 'protect' white labor, to the modern day accusations that "Hispanics [...] tak[e] jobs away from 'Americans'"[1]

A related theme of the book is the pattern of capitalist owners pitting different immigrant groups against one another, as a strike-breaking tactic. For example, the book relates that the Order of the Knights of St. Crispin was unsuccessful in persuading Chinese workers to join the 1878 Chicago shoemakers' strike, when the latter were recruited as strikebreakers by shoe factory owners.
ENDQUOTE

The Warmth of Other Suns is also a good book.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Manifestor_of_Light (Reply #19)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 03:46 PM

20. I've read Zinn and Takaki and both books are on my shelf.

I've heard of James Loewen and both books. I read parts of "Sundown Towns" in a magazine article a while back. Thanks, i will read both these books.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Manifestor_of_Light (Reply #19)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 09:30 PM

30. AP US History teachers are way ahead of you.

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/members/courses/teachers_corner/51122.html

Note that the article states clearly that many AP US History teachers use Zinn's book. I've never known an AP teacher not to use it, actually, as it is recommended by the College Board as best for preparing students for the AP test. Because of that, many schools have students read it in their first US History class so as to get them ready for AP, should they choose to take it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to knitter4democracy (Reply #30)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 10:06 PM

32. We didn't have Zinn's book or any of those books when I was in high school.

We had the standard boring drivel.

I graduated from high school over forty years ago.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Manifestor_of_Light (Reply #32)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 10:55 PM

35. Me neither, but I had a wonderful history teacher in 11th grade

1963. He inspired me to explore American history. I read Zinn's book in the early 80's and my children have all read it. It was not taught in any school they attended.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Reply #35)

Tue Jan 6, 2015, 02:31 PM

37. I had a cool government teacher in the 12th grade.

He explained the facts of life about why our town was totally white--what is now known as redlining. We had one black student out of 3,400 kids in 4 grades in a massive suburban high school. I don't think our school district was integrated until the late 70s.

He had a poster on his door of American Gothic with Shirley Chisholm (first black women congressperson--even before Barbara Jordan) and George Wallace! I guess it must have gone over the heads of the administrators!!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Manifestor_of_Light (Reply #19)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 09:38 PM

31. One of my favorite teachers was more about the approach than the specific material

He taught several subjects depending on the grade level and year, with a mostly traditional narrative going by the curriculum, but made a point of putting a lot of pressure on the students to interpret and not just recite it.

So we'd be talking about one topic or another and he'd pose a question, usually a fairly straightforward fact-based one (think "when was the Battle of Austerlitz?" or the like - something with a specific answer).

A student would respond, and then he'd follow up just with the word "Why?" They'd give another answer - usually talking about what was going on before the event being asked about - and then he'd ask "Why?" again.

Wherever the starting point, he wasn't really satisfied with a student until they could look at the starting event, follow it back through three or four or five or six links in the causal chain, and start thinking about what other events were tied to a point, or connected through other chains in a consistent mesh over space and time. It wasn't about "this inevitably led to this" as much as "these things affected one another, even if a century separated them."

Three or so would usually do it - this was an eleventh grade public school class after all - but sometimes the student would be on the ball, or he'd be in a weird mood, and we'd get these Byzantine cause-and-effect road trips connecting the space race to the Thirty Years War or whatnot.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Posteritatis (Reply #31)

Mon Jan 5, 2015, 11:00 PM

36. My 11th grade history teacher was the same..

always asking why? and what's the significance of that event? It was 1963 and everything was changing. I went to an inner city school and this teacher helped us understand the movement in the context of history. I loved that class.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Posteritatis (Reply #31)

Wed Jan 7, 2015, 12:26 AM

46. Standard Socratic method. A favorite of mine when I teach English.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Tue Jan 6, 2015, 05:07 PM

38. High school history and biology textbooks in the U.S.A. are mostly crap.

They are specifically designed to make it easy for teachers and school districts uncomfortable with the facts of racism in U.S. history, or evolution in biology, to dance very lightly over those "sections."

Nevertheless, evolution is the core principal of biology, and racism, frequently to genocidal extremes, is the central outstanding feature of U.S.A. history.

My kids' AP high school history teacher pushed the boundaries -- he had Zinn's People's History on his class reading list. If a kid couldn't afford a copy, he'd make sure they got one. (I was introduced in college to the 1980 edition.)

My own grade school, middle school, and high school history textbooks were crap. I was lucky to have two history teachers who were somewhat subversive and mildly mocking of the texts they were forced to teach from.

Later, as a teacher myself, in a school where budgets for the Xerox and ditto machine were absurdly tight, I was grateful for my teachers who had dedicated some of their income and a lot of their time to provide us with alternative readings, printed up at their own expense at the commercial copy shops. A few cents a page on a teacher's salary with 100-200 students is not a negligible expense. I always spent a lot of my own money on lab supplies and handouts when I was teaching.

My sister-in-law is still teaching high school science and her official budget is pathetic, less than three dollars a student each year. And yes, they still expect you to do labs... Just one of some of the labs in the textbooks could blow an entire year's budget.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hunter (Reply #38)

Tue Jan 6, 2015, 06:22 PM

39. It is about money and making do.

In our rural district, every teacher has second and third jobs. The starting pay is less than $2000/month and the cost of living here is high. Parents subsidize labs, the workshops and sports. Ours is a small community and for the 12 years my daughter attending public schools here. One thing we do have is a charter school which is under performing and sucks money from the school budget but has stayed afloat despite management problems and the teachers earning even less than the public schools.

The elementary school in our little town closed about 4 years ago. It was an important part of our community. The kids go the elementary school 15 miles away. State funding has been cut so much due to federal spending cuts, and so it goes. The military gets it all.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Original post)

Tue Jan 6, 2015, 08:06 PM

40. If that disturbs you,

I'd be happy for you to show up at a school board meeting to discuss the teaching of history with my school board.

I'll bet I'm not the only teacher out there that has been directly instructed, in an evaluation meeting, to "stop teaching so much history and focus on the reading test."

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LWolf (Reply #40)

Tue Jan 6, 2015, 10:14 PM

41. I wouldn't be surprised at all if you're right about that..

one comment was someone who's teacher taught the class about redlining. I can hardly imagine that being acceptable in any school district today.. no controversy. It stinks. I don't know how teachers manage to teach and inspire kids with the budget and academic restraints put on them, but most teachers I've known do it very well.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mountain grammy (Reply #41)

Wed Jan 7, 2015, 08:22 AM

47. We do it

because we love our students, and we love helping them learn, regardless of what tptb demand from us, so we do our best to comply with orders and continue to reach out to students IN SPITE of those orders.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LWolf (Reply #40)

Tue Jan 6, 2015, 10:16 PM

42. You've actually been told that? That is horrible.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to liberal_at_heart (Reply #42)

Wed Jan 7, 2015, 08:24 AM

48. Yes.

And I still find ways to insert social studies, including history, into the day. I just call it a reading lesson, focusing on "informational text."

As long as the admin sees reading skills being taught when he walks through the door, I can defend it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LWolf (Reply #40)

Wed Jan 7, 2015, 12:05 AM

43. Oh, I've heard that in meetings, too.

When scores are low and money's on the line, administrators become awfully myopic.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to knitter4democracy (Reply #43)

Wed Jan 7, 2015, 08:24 AM

49. Yes.

It doesn't help that our site admins are now evaluated based on the school's test scores.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread