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Wed Oct 15, 2014, 07:18 AM

Ebola, outside the box.. (my friend's near-death experience in 1968)

My friend had just gotten notice that her fiance's plane had been shot down in Viet Nam, and she did not yet know that he and his crew were rescued).

She was beside herself with worry, and decided to have a hot bath after hours of crying.

She ran a hot bath and put in bath oil beads.

Hours later, she awoke short of breath and covered with red welts.

Her mom rushed her to the ER, and they admitted her.

The diagnosis was a systemic poisoning...

The hot water opened her pores, and had let in the ingredients of the bath oil beads... She recovered, but was told that she could have just as easily died from the overload .

Which brings me to ebola:

Could it be that the intense body heat that builds up inside those sealed protective suits, also opens all the pores, so that IF a spec of fluids lands on the worker in the un-gowning, it has a more direct path into their own bodies, though those pores?

What if there were a refrigeration/freezer unit that they went into before disrobing, to cool them down and shrink down the pores before they took off the gear?

Or if they were washed down (fully suited) with super cold water?

The family who lived with Duncan have all tested ok, but then their apartment was probably air conditioned.. The ones who have gotten the disease from him were supposedly protected by the hot-suits..

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Response to SoCalDem (Original post)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 07:30 AM

1. The ebola virus can penetrate the body by coming into contact with skin so

it would seem that open pores would aid in the transmission but it would really not be necessary for infection to occur.

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Response to Malraiders (Reply #1)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 07:36 AM

2. What I have heard is that it's through mucous membranes

and broken skin..

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Response to SoCalDem (Original post)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 07:38 AM

3. Well worth considering.

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Response to SoCalDem (Original post)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 07:45 AM

4. Even if not, that's an interesting story. Thanks for sharing.

 

[hr][font color="blue"][center]“If you're not committed to anything, you're just taking up space.”
Gregory Peck, Mirage (1965)
[/center][/font][hr]

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Response to SoCalDem (Original post)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 07:47 AM

5. What about irritation of skin from taping and untaping?

I'm still puzzled about the nurses being told to tape over their necks if they were worried about exposure of that skin.

It's out of my knowledge so I can't do anything but wonder. I know tape used on bandages isn't as sticky and hair-pulling as it was. But if you apply it and remove it many times a day, how does skin on the neck hold up?

How well thought out was that protocol changing step?

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Response to HereSince1628 (Reply #5)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 07:50 AM

6. I am allergic to something on the tape and get a rash.....

so, the tape on the neck thingy, really left me scratching my head....

band aids, paper tapes, regular tapes... I didn't use to be. Maybe they are using a new kind of glue. But damn I can't find a band aid or tape I can use.

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Response to boston bean (Reply #6)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 07:51 AM

7. That whole thing makes me think that they made stuff up

as they went along, without thinking things through

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Response to SoCalDem (Reply #7)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 09:27 AM

10. Making stuff up as they go along is a understatement..

The CDC and the USA so called privatized band-aid healthcare system is placing us all at risk. The CDC has LIED from the beginning. The period of incubation was initial told to the public at large to be 7, then 14 now 21 but in reality 42 and in the sperm of a Man 90 days. Yes, 90 days in a MANS Sperm.

The lack of Infectious disease protocols in Dallas is more than concerning. This shows the cracks up to 5 miles wide in our American Privatized Healthcare System. If anything, we need to start questioning REASONABLY this is a Plague, possibly another Black Plague:

"Most people assume that the fourteenth-century Black Death that quickly ravaged the western world was a bacterial bubonic plague epidemic caused by flea bites and spread by rats. But the Black Death killed a high proportion of Scandinavians where it was too cold for fleas to survive. Biology of Plagues. Evidence from Historical Populations published by Cambridge University Press, analyzed 2,500 years of plagues and concluded that the Black Death was caused by a viral hemorrhagic fever pandemic similar to Ebola. If this is correct, the future medical and economic impacts from Ebola have been vastly underestimated.

Authors Dr. Susan Scott, a demographer, and Dr. Christopher J. Duncan, a zoologist at the University of Liverpool point out that the Bible used the term “plague” to describe a catchall of afflictions resulting from divine displeasure. The researchers analyzed the “Four Ages of Plague”, including the “Plague of Athens” from 430 to 427 BC that killed about a third of the city; the “Plague of Justinian” from 542 to 592 AD and killed 10,000 a day in Constantinople; the Black Plague from 1337 to 1340 AD that killed a third of Eurasia; and a series of plague outbreaks in Europe from 1350 to 1670 that killed about half a number of city populations.

Historical records of the Athenian plague paint a very similar picture to the Black Death and the accelerating Ebola pandemic. Like Ebola, the plague is believed to have originated in Africa and then travelled northward.

Athenians suffered a sudden onset of severe headache, inflamed eyes, and bleeding in their mouths and throats. The next symptoms were coughing, sneezing, and chest pains; followed by stomach cramps, intensive vomiting and diarrhea, and unquenchable thirst. With flushed skin burning from fever and open sores, 50-90% died in the second week of symptoms. Desperate to cool off, contagious victims may have transmitted the disease to other humans by jumping into public cisterns and watering troughs.

Bubonic plague was first recorded in China about 37 AD and still is a worldwide public health problem with thousands of cases each year. The most recent outbreak was in the Chinese city of Yumen on July 22, 2014, where a man died after handling a dead marmot. The Chinese military responded by quarantining 30,000 local residents."


http://www.americanthinker.com/2014/10/is_ebola_the_same_virus_as_the_black_death.html

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Response to HereSince1628 (Reply #5)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 09:18 AM

8. are you effing kidding me?!?! they were told to tape their necks?!?!

 



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Response to magical thyme (Reply #8)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 01:49 PM

12. I'm not kidding...

here is a link to a story with that, but it's been discussed on DU for days

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/14/health/texas-ebola-nurses-union-claims/index.html

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Response to SoCalDem (Original post)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 09:22 AM

9. unless they are wearing a biohazard suit, which is not part of droplet precautions,

 

they can't be washed down.

If they were wearing biohazard suits, they could be washed down with bleach solution. Which is what they do at the 4 centers that were set up specifically for treating BSL-4 infections and in Africa.

Which leads me to the question, if biohazards suits are deemed necessary at the BSL centers, why are they not deemed necessary at ordinary hospitals?

As to entering through opened pores, who knows? Viruses are pretty darn small, even the big ones.

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Response to magical thyme (Reply #9)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 02:44 PM

13. That's a very important question...

"... if biohazards suits are deemed necessary at the BSL centers, why are they not deemed necessary at ordinary hospitals?"

Seems like the front lines should be using the best gear, too. Especially since no one really knows what we're dealing with.

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Response to SoCalDem (Original post)

Wed Oct 15, 2014, 09:29 AM

11. I'm so happy your friend was ok! Your theory about Ebola is interesting...

but probably not likely. The virus can actually survive longer in cooler temps, and skin pore size isn't really a factor. Ebola virus is so highly concentrated in just one drop of blood that it takes very little to become infected.

From what I know, contraction of Ebola most likely occurs during disrobing, especially the gloves. A person might accidentally touch the outside of the glove, then touch their face or elsewhere. All is takes is one small mistake that they may not even remember doing.

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