HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » A year and a half after &...

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 01:40 AM

A year and a half after "70 lbs. down. Now I can rant about obnoxious fitness fanatics"...

...time for a less ranty rant.

Back in February of last year, I posted this:

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022301667

About six months after that post, I was down 85 lbs, and I've been holding steady at that weight ever since, while building more strength and endurance.

One positive thing I can add to what I said before: I've finally found something to do for exercise that I really enjoy doing, and something that for the first time has let me occasionally experience the "runner's high" that long eluded me.

Hiking mountain trails.



Hiking is not, however, by itself, enough to be all the exercise I need. Not by far. It's a weekend/vacation activity when the weather's good for it. I still have to keep up with the stuff I consider drudgery most the time to give myself the fitness and endurance I need to do well at the hiking.

But it's fun to be 51 years old and to be leaving the teens and twenty-somethings in the dust. I can reach the top of NH's Mount Monadnock in just a hair under 50 minutes, when most people take one and a half to two hours for the same hike, and then I can listen to people half my age groaning about how they'll never, ever put themselves through that climb again -- the same one I've done five times this past summer and several times last year. I've also climbed NH's Mount Washington twice now, once last year and once this year. If you subtract the time I took to eat lunch at the summit, I did my last Mount Washington climb in better than an hour under "book time".

There's a down side to trying to do this for speed, however -- risk of injury. These aren't technical trails I'm climbing -- no need for ropes or pitons or any of that stuff -- good sturdy hiking boots and very optionally some trek poles will do. But the footing can be tricky enough in some places that slipping, tripping, and falling are easy if you aren't careful, and the jagged, rocky terrain doesn't provide a soft landing.

Without going into the details, I've suffered a few injuries, and have had to learn to be a bit more careful -- no more trying to go back down Monadnock, for example, even faster than I went up, not after spraining my ankle badly last summer while going back down in under 40 minutes.

I hope I don't have to get so careful, however, that it takes all the fun and exhilaration out of my hikes. I'll always, of course, love the scenery and the views and the feeling of being out among the trees and the rocks and wildlife -- you can enjoy all that without speed. But the "runner's high" feeling comes from really pushing myself, keeping moving at a steady pace with little or no rest.

I miss the feeling of heedlessly bounding downhill like a mountain goat, but at least uphill is still good for me for speed. (It's much, much easier to remain stable while ascending rather than descending.) I have to remind myself even then, however, that uphill isn't 100% safe either, and if I screw up badly it won't be just the mountain trails, but 90% of everything else I do for burning calories that will be tabled for weeks or months.













I do wonder how long I'll be able to keep up my current level of fitness. I think I've developed good habits of both eating and exercise that will keep me from getting way out of control again, but I'm currently spending an hour and a half to two hours each day, six days a week, on exercise. I usually burn at least 1000 calories/day, often more. My continuing short commute, flexible schedule, and gym at work help make that level of activity possible, but I realize that for most people that's a thoroughly impractical amount of time to devote to exercise. Maybe at some point it will no longer be practical for me.

I've gotten used to eating 3000-3500 calories a day. I actually had to make myself snack more because I started losing more weight than I wanted to lose. Now I've gotten used to grazing all evening (on yogurt, fruit, peanut butter, jerky, air-popped popcorn, dark chocolate, etc.). If I ever have to cut back on my exercise, and thus cut back on the eating that balances out that exercise, it'll be tough to go back to eating more like I did when I was actively trying to lose weight.

At any rate, this last weekend was one of those hikes that really gave me a great high, a high that lingered right on into today. Here's a panorama taken from the Cliff Trail on North Pack Monadnock.

http://www.dermandar.com/p/dBPrcz/Cliff%20Trail%202014-09-20_2

53 replies, 4659 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 53 replies Author Time Post
Reply A year and a half after "70 lbs. down. Now I can rant about obnoxious fitness fanatics"... (Original post)
Silent3 Sep 2014 OP
daleanime Sep 2014 #1
Silent3 Sep 2014 #2
dipsydoodle Sep 2014 #3
Uncle Joe Sep 2014 #4
Enthusiast Sep 2014 #5
Cha Sep 2014 #6
Granny M Sep 2014 #7
Silent3 Sep 2014 #12
joshcryer Sep 2014 #8
Chico Man Sep 2014 #9
Silent3 Sep 2014 #14
Chico Man Sep 2014 #48
Silent3 Sep 2014 #49
Happyhippychick Sep 2014 #10
BlueJazz Sep 2014 #11
aikoaiko Sep 2014 #13
Silent3 Sep 2014 #17
aikoaiko Sep 2014 #21
Arugula Latte Sep 2014 #31
Silent3 Sep 2014 #35
daleanime Sep 2014 #45
moriah Sep 2014 #53
PasadenaTrudy Sep 2014 #27
shanti Sep 2014 #42
Gormy Cuss Sep 2014 #15
Silent3 Sep 2014 #16
Gormy Cuss Sep 2014 #18
Silent3 Sep 2014 #19
librechik Sep 2014 #20
Silent3 Sep 2014 #22
librechik Sep 2014 #26
logosoco Sep 2014 #23
PasadenaTrudy Sep 2014 #24
Silent3 Sep 2014 #39
Tom_Foolery Sep 2014 #25
nobodyspecial Sep 2014 #28
Silent3 Sep 2014 #37
Half-Century Man Sep 2014 #29
sheshe2 Sep 2014 #30
Jesus Malverde Sep 2014 #32
Silent3 Sep 2014 #51
bhikkhu Sep 2014 #33
Silent3 Sep 2014 #36
Dyedinthewoolliberal Sep 2014 #34
pinboy3niner Sep 2014 #38
Silent3 Sep 2014 #40
Raffi Ella Sep 2014 #41
Silent3 Sep 2014 #44
Raffi Ella Sep 2014 #46
R B Garr Sep 2014 #43
lumberjack_jeff Sep 2014 #47
dipsydoodle Sep 2014 #50
Silent3 Sep 2014 #52

Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 01:50 AM

1. Great work!

Enjoy the results!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to daleanime (Reply #1)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 01:52 AM

2. Thanks. :) n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 01:55 AM

3. As far as I'm concernered even awesome don't fit that.

That is impressive and I am as proud of you as you are well entitled to be yourself.

Very best wishes to you and

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 02:01 AM

4. Good for you, Silent and those are some great pics.

Thanks for sharing.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 02:52 AM

5. Excellent pictures, Silent3.

Thanks for sharing.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 03:44 AM

6. Awesome for you, Silent.. and so worth it to take an active part in our well being! Love

the pics of your mountain climbing on Mount Monadnock in New Hampshire.. so much fun.

I'm not a fanatical fitness fanatic but I do think consistent exercise is one of the keys to a good healthy life.. I know running is my therapy and it's cheap too.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 03:48 AM

7. Well done, Silent3!

I was toying with the idea of joining a local walking club. Reading your post has made me determined to do it. At 60, I need to stay active - it's too easy to sit and play on the computer too much.

Again, well done!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Granny M (Reply #7)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 07:42 AM

12. Walking is a big part of my exercise too.

I've started mixing in a bit of running now and then too, but just plain old walking covers a lot of what I do to meet my calorie burning goals. The longest I've gone so far in one day was a bit over the 26.2 miles of a marathon. I didn't run, but I did keep up a 15-minute/mile pace -- not counting the nice long lunch break in the middle that marathon runners don't get.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 04:19 AM

8. So happy for you Silent3!

Finding an enjoyable way to get that well needed exercise is the holy grail for a lot of people.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 04:44 AM

9. Try yoga

It's a great compliment to fast hiking, especially during the winter New England months. The added strength and flexibility gained makes a big difference for hiking.

I've been hiking the same mountains as you, in fact was just up Washington a few weeks ago on what looks like a very similar day.

The third thing we do is stand up paddle boarding- feels like hiking on water. It's a bit more luxurious but great exercise nonetheless.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Chico Man (Reply #9)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 07:56 AM

14. I should really explore more mountains and different trails...

...but Monadnock, Pack Monadnock, and North Pack are the only ones really close to me, so those have become my typical weekend workout mountains. It's a good two and a half hours each way for me to get up to the White Mountains. The two times I've hiked Mt. Washington so far I drove up the evening before to stay in a cheap hotel overnight, just so I could hit the mountain feeling fresh and not have to squeeze five hours of driving along with six or more hours of hiking all into one day.

I probably should try yoga, but so far I haven't been able to muster the patience for anything that requires much attention to detail and form. I've been doing some cross training, but I only do that twice per week, one of those times paying a personal trainer simply because I don't trust myself to keep up good form without someone watching over me.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Reply #14)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 04:29 PM

48. Other places to try..

Not sure if you are in MA... I am, and have the same difficulties finding good places... but have found several.

Holyoke Traverse (start at the notch, and go east or west and then back). This is an amazing traverse, especially going west from notch to the summit house and then back. You go over all of the seven sisters with views on both sides the entire time. VERY challenging as you keep going up and down over rough terrain... certainly comparable to Monadnock.. but I'd say even more challenging. ~8-10 miles round trip.

Leominster State Forest to Wachusett and back. You can take the mid state trail from the parking lot at the state forest all the way to the wachusett summit. By the time you start hitting the elevation change up Wachusett you should be flying!! ~8-9 miles round trip.

For Monadnock, I've only hiked Pumpelly, a much longer hike but much less crowded with wonderful above treeline views for the second half.

In regards to the yoga - it's more about breathing than anything else - for a pose, as long as you can breathe easily, you are ok, just listen to yourself and don't overdo it and you'll be fine. The cumulative strength and endurance gained is quite remarkable over a year or so of 1-2 sessions a week. For me, it's essential for injury prevention as I seem to have calves that like to pull..

Great work getting out there!! I feel absolutely the same way about hiking. It's such a wonderful activity that one could take into a very old age and still enjoy.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Chico Man (Reply #48)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 05:15 PM

49. Wachusett would be about the same distance as Monadnock for me about 40 miles.

If my googling is telling me correctly that this Holyoke Traverse is in or near Amherst, MA, that's about 75 miles -- a bit far, but still a lot less than heading up to the White Mountains.

Great suggestions. Thanks!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 07:00 AM

10. Awesome! And yes, do try yoga!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 07:03 AM

11. I admire you. You wanted something and reached for it! Yes!

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 07:46 AM

13. On the other side of the continuum, I've basically given up.


At this point (46) I only hope to get my 9-year old through college before kicking the bucket.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to aikoaiko (Reply #13)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 09:20 AM

17. Health issues making it difficult, hard finding time, or just lack of motivation?

I spent many years. over a decade, in a half-hearted "yeah, I oughta get back in shape again" state of procrastination. It took seeing my weight hit over 260 lbs, on top of starting to feel like an old man just getting up off the couch, to get me eating well and working out again.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Reply #17)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 10:53 AM

21. I suppose a little bit of everything


I know the answer. Eat better and exercise more.

I don't want to be a downer (any more than I have been) in your happy thread.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to aikoaiko (Reply #21)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:40 AM

31. Please don't give up...

 

Kids need parents long after college ends.

Smokers often have to quite five or ten or twenty times before they succeed. I hope you will keep trying to make changes. (Don't try to change everything at once...just add a little of the good stuff and subtract a little bit of the bad stuff bit by bit.)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to aikoaiko (Reply #21)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 01:09 PM

35. Hey, don't worry about the "downer" stuff. My original post a year and a half ago...

...was partly driven by annoyance way too much "bright siding" crap.

While I certainly don't want to discourage anyone from fitness and better diet, I fully acknowledge that it's all a trade off, and at different times in your life, or with different things being important to you, it can be a perfectly valid decision that all the time and effort for a fitness regime might not be worth it to you.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to aikoaiko (Reply #21)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 02:42 PM

45. Please don't worry about it(being a downer)....

Don't what you can, when you can.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to aikoaiko (Reply #21)

Thu Sep 25, 2014, 02:16 AM

53. It wouldn't hurt to get a physical/hormone workup, too, if you decide to try again.

While yes, diet and exercise are key, there are reasons why two people with the same height and musculature might have dramatically different metabolisms.

Thyroid levels are just one thing -- insulin resistance and "metabolic syndrome x" are also things that can make losing weight difficult, even if you're eating right and exercising. If you're female, PCOS can make it nearly impossible to lose weight, since it's so closely related to insulin resistance.

When I topped out again at 203 (after having once been 236 lbs and losing down into the 140s), I asked my doctor for help. Along with diet and exercise recommendations, he also wrote me a prescription for Metformin, to see if it would help -- even though my A1C and blood sugar levels were good. I was only on it for two months, but it did seem to be the boost my metabolism needed (though some of the weight loss could have been from the constant case of the trots the crap caused), and when I got into the 180s it was far easier to exercise -- when you have bum joints, which often come with carrying weight around, it's really difficult to get started on an exercise program. I could only do 10 minutes on the seated elliptical at first before the knee I dislocated hurt too much to continue. (I overshot my goal more than a bit, but I'm now in the healthy weight range for my height, and hope to stay there.)

Also, watch out if you start "magically" losing weight without trying. Mom was thrilled she'd lost 20 lbs without trying, until she found out the reason was she had developed full-blown diabetes and her sugars were insanely high. If you notice a sudden drop when you haven't made changes to diet, exercise, or prescriptions, get thee to a doctor, please. At least diabetes is treatable -- unexplained weight loss can have other reasons that are far worse.

All that being said.... you aren't a downer at all. Anybody who tells you that it's easy is full of manure.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to aikoaiko (Reply #13)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:12 AM

27. I know how you feel

Don't get down on yourself, do the best you can. Most days all I can handle is going up and down the stairs in my apt bldg with groceries. That's exercise right there. Last night I walked down to the corner and back slowly. Big deal for me. I'm 50 with health issues....If I make it to 70 that will be an achievement, lol

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to PasadenaTrudy (Reply #27)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 02:27 PM

42. stairs

my house is a single story, so no stairs, but when i visisted my eldest son in july, i stayed with him and his family in their new home. it's a 3 story condo, and the guest bedroom is on the third floor. i was there a week and was sooooo happy to get home and not to have to climb those stairs constantly! stairs are definitely a workout, and some people plan it that way!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 08:37 AM

15. Congrats, but speeding down Monadnock?

I hope that you didn't try that on Spellman trail.

Which ascents do you use?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Gormy Cuss (Reply #15)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 09:06 AM

16. White Dot and White Cross

Lately, however, I've been heading out to the Gilson Pond entrance, taking the Birchcroft and Red Dot trails to the summit.

What's funny is that I sprained my ankle about half way down, but adrenaline and endorphins must have kept me from feeling how badly I'd hurt myself. I jogged a lot of the more level stretch near the end of the trail going back, managing 39:56 for my time.

It wasn't until I tried to get out of my car later and could barely walk that I fully realized the damage done.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Reply #16)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 09:22 AM

18. Birchtoft is nice.

It's been years since I lived close enough to hike Monadnock but when I lived in Boston I used to climb it about a dozen times every year. For a quiet hike I'd take White Dot to Lost Farm and Parker; for a sporty hike near the summit I'd hike over to Cascade link and Spellman. I never came up the Pumpelly side.


eta: I see that you stay near the Monadnocks because the White Mtns are too far. The Welch and Dickey loop in Waterville Valley isn't a high or hard ascent but is a good length for a workout.



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Gormy Cuss (Reply #18)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 10:29 AM

19. I've taken the Pumpelly trail twice now

I find it a bit weird, however, to just park my car in a nondescript, unofficial spot on the side of the road and walk through private property to get onto the trail.

I haven't tried the Spellman trail yet, or any of the western approach either. I've been sticking with Pack/North Pack for a few weeks because of some knee trouble, but now I'm ready to go back to Monadnock on the next nice weather day that I can also take a day off from work, just so I can enjoy a less crowded experience.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 10:45 AM

20. take it easy--walking is as effective as running, and less injuries n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to librechik (Reply #20)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:00 AM

22. This isn't running I'm talking about, it's just a fast pace for the terrain.

On level ground I go around 4 mph (a 15-minute mile) while walking. Most people consider that a brisk pace, but it's still just a walk, not a run.

When hiking a mountain trail even moving at around 2.5 mph is making good time. The typical hiker slows down to 1-2 mph on rocky slopes, which is a snail's pace on level ground.

As for actually running, I've heard a different things about running vs. walking, and running is more effective for some goals. As a practical matter running gets the same calorie burning job done faster, which is why on some mornings, when I'm trying to get a decent workout in before work, I turn 2 miles of a 4 1/2 mile walk into a run instead, and I can get the whole route done in under an hour, and burn about 50-75 more calories than when I just walk it all.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Reply #22)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:10 AM

26. my 17 year old grandson has taken up running--now he's super buff and all fit and disciplined

so proud! Congrats to you, too. Muy beloved exercise is a hulky 1500 watt vibrator plate I jump on one an hour while i'm home. Feels so good! Starting to tighten up! (i've only had it 3 weeks)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:02 AM

23. Beautiful pictures!

And so glad to hear about your personal journey. My joints (hips, back, shoulders mainly) are having major issues after a life of crappy jobs, so I decided I need to work on the muscular part of my body. Walking everyday (thanks dog, for reminding me to get out there) and some dancing with 3 pound weights has kept me from becoming bed ridden. I still have some problems getting up after sitting and sometimes my hips make me stumble, but that I can live with.
On a family road trip this year, I was able to do more than I would have if I had not been taking care of this bag of bones.
Now I need to fight my sweet tooth and carb cravings and maybe lose some of this extra 25-30 pounds I don't need. I think my bones would appreciate that, too.
Stories like yours are a good inspiration!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:07 AM

24. You are so lucky...

I'm 50 and I put on a lot of lbs in the past 4 yrs. I lost my mom and my only sister w/in 2 months of eachother. All through this, I was going through menopause. It was awful. I have fibromyalgia and CFS, so I've never been able to really exercise much. I'm also heat and photosensitive, so anything over 80 degrees is too hot for me. I take strolls, grocery shop, climb my stairs. That's about all I can handle. I wish I lived in a cooler climate like OR or WA! Anyway, enjoy the lovely hikes, I like your photos

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to PasadenaTrudy (Reply #24)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 02:12 PM

39. Hell, I used to hate temperatures much over 70.

I sweat. A lot. This means I've got to allow for time to shower even after workouts that wouldn't get most people very sweaty. And I can't even just jump into the shower to cool off. I have to cool down some before I take a shower, or I come out of the shower still sweating.

It took a while for me to simply accept being a sweaty mess for so much of the time during and after a work out, especially when the weather is in the 80s and the 90s. After a few months, however, I finally got used to it, and I've gotten much more comfortable with warm weather than I ever thought I'd be.

This past Saturday, however, was for ideal for me for a long mountain hike. The temperature was in the 60s. I still get plenty sweaty even in short sleeves and shorts at that temperature, but I feel so much more comfortable.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:09 AM

25. Congratulations!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:12 AM

28. Trim your calories to match a reduced activity level

and you don't have to work out as many hours. I'm sure you can find a balance. Great job!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to nobodyspecial (Reply #28)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 01:19 PM

37. For now, I'm happy to be able to eat more, so I'm willing to pay the price...

...of the extra workout time. But yes, one of these days, I imagine I'll likely cut back on both.

Of course, it's not about being able to enjoy eating more. I don't think I'd have the endurance that I'm enjoying, or a resting heart rate of 60 bpm, without all of this exercise.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:21 AM

29. I am envous of you Silent. (or should I call you Mr.3 ?)

Not only for your topography, but because I fear my climbing days are pretty much over.
So, if it isn't too much trouble; keep submitting pictures.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:26 AM

30. Good for you Silent.

It's so beautiful up there, I hiked it many years ago.

Bravo!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:43 AM

32. Much Respect.

It takes discipline and dedication to change like that.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Jesus Malverde (Reply #32)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 09:34 PM

51. Thanks. Some might call it dedication, others might call it...

...an artfully channeled obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 11:53 AM

33. Awesome post, and congratulations!

I've seen too many people throw in the towel on physical expectations and activity. 40 isn't old - its not even halfway through a good life. I had been an avid cyclist myself when younger, and when I hit 40 I took a good look at things and decided I'd either have to change, or begin the downward slide into age and infirmity. I quit smoking and drinking and began cycling to work, then cycling on the weekends, then riding with the local gang, then competing. It was great fun, and its a great feeling to be able to keep up with the younger guys, beat them on occasion, and (the best, really) know that the other guys have to work hard to push themselves ahead of me on the road. In a race it was never so much about winning as knowing that my being there made sure the race and the effort was real for the winners.

Currently I have a new job, much more physically and mentally demanding, and probably the best one I've had in my life. Cycling is by the wayside at the moment, but I've carried in a level of fitness that lets me work hard and consistently and enjoy it. 49 now, and I'm looking forward to putting in a few hard years and getting set-up for a healthy retirement, and its all good.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bhikkhu (Reply #33)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 01:13 PM

36. I'm hoping that if I keep this up for the next few years...

...even if age eventually makes all this stuff harder to do, that the extra free time when I'm retired will make it easier to get plenty of exercise in every day, even if it's at a (little!) slower pace.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 12:08 PM

34. Great photos!

You should post a few in the Photography Forum

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 01:25 PM

38. Whew! I was afraid you were going to say that your discovery was...

...Prancercise.

Great story and pics, more power to you!

About that other thing, just remember...



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #38)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 02:15 PM

40. Hiking on the weekends...

...Prancercise every morning!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 02:19 PM

41. Amazing post.

I'm an avid trail runner, I know that "high" well! I am so very excited for you that you are at this point in your journey of health and fitness, Silent3. Take care out there and Enjoy the Ride ~

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Raffi Ella (Reply #41)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 02:34 PM

44. My local park has one section of trail...

...that's narrow, a bit rough, a bit hilly, with plenty of rocks and tree roots. Even though I'm not much of a runner in general, for some reason that terrain makes me want to run, and it often feels great to run through it. Maybe it's just familiarity, because I spend so much time in that park, but I don't feel very worried at all about tripping and hurting myself like I do with many sections of the mountain trails.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Reply #44)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 03:23 PM

46. hah! Yeah, I don't know what it is about a trail...

I used to run on the street where speed and distance are the main challenge, but it was never about speed for me, it was about the actual ability to be able to run in the first place. After a couple of years running on the street a friend of mine suggested I take my run to the trail-

I was hooked almost immediately. It's an exhilarating experience, I love it. I go up to the N.Ga Mountains on the weekends to hike and sometimes run the trials up there. It is kind of dangerous, I do a lot of cross training to help prevent injuries, strengthen my ankles- the shoes are half the battle on a trail, still! I always end up with a bruise or a scratch or two when I come off a trail, but it's worth it

your pictures are incredible! I can't imagine what that must look like in person. You're very lucky to have such an amazing place to work out in.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 02:28 PM

43. I just love your story! Thanks for sharing it.

It hit home with me about the time spent exercising, as I've been going through a phase of realization that I couldn't keep up some of my exercise routines because I was sacrificing time in other areas. My time in the gym wasn't just the hour exercising, it was the drive time and then getting there early to get a good spot, etc. When I first started out with the exercise routine, I just walked 20 to 30 minutes per day, but I got hooked and kept increasing the activities. For me, I came to the realization that it really is about 80% diet and the exercise didn't keep me from gaining back, although it is a much slower gain, so the exercise did change my metabolism.

It's a wonderful thing you've achieved! You've gotten me motivated again. Beautiful pictures.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 03:40 PM

47. I've often fallen into the trap of thinking of fitness as a project.

 

For myself, I've learned to admire the view from atop whatever trail I'm on and appreciate the blessing of physical ability that enabled me to get there.

When (not if) I sprain an ankle or catch the flu it then doesn't feel like failure.

I still go to the gym, but I don't have goals or a plan, just a habit.

At 52, I'm never going to run a 20 minute 5K again. I'm okay with that.

Unlike my wife who needs new knees, or my brother in law with MS, I'm fortunate to have the abilities I have.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Sep 22, 2014, 08:26 PM

50. Another kick.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Wed Sep 24, 2014, 07:31 PM

52. For all the people who asked for more pictures...

...I just posted a bunch from Mt. Washington in the Photography forum.

http://www.democraticunderground.com/103634349

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread