HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » I want to buy a horse

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:43 AM

 

I want to buy a horse

It has been my lifelong dream, and I'd like to also raise a few goats, too. How much land do you need to do something like that? I live in the South, and it isn't as though rural life is unknown to me.

Seriously, if there is someone in the South that can help me out, I'd appreciate it. I have a lot of planning, and I know it is physically intensive. I just need some ideas with the planning part to make sure that I do the best I can for the animals in my care.

82 replies, 7111 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 82 replies Author Time Post
Reply I want to buy a horse (Original post)
Aerows Apr 2012 OP
maddezmom Apr 2012 #1
Aerows Apr 2012 #3
antigone382 Apr 2012 #2
Aerows Apr 2012 #4
riderinthestorm Apr 2012 #12
Aerows Apr 2012 #18
ThomThom Apr 2012 #67
hamsterjill Apr 2012 #5
Aerows Apr 2012 #11
larkrake Apr 2012 #23
Scout Apr 2012 #27
sarcasmo Apr 2012 #6
Aerows Apr 2012 #13
KurtNYC Apr 2012 #7
Aerows Apr 2012 #14
snooper2 Apr 2012 #19
Aerows Apr 2012 #22
Snake Alchemist Apr 2012 #29
Aerows Apr 2012 #73
snooper2 Apr 2012 #51
Aerows Apr 2012 #55
snooper2 Apr 2012 #63
Aerows Apr 2012 #72
Voice for Peace Apr 2012 #32
Aerows Apr 2012 #54
Voice for Peace Apr 2012 #65
riderinthestorm Apr 2012 #8
Aerows Apr 2012 #17
riderinthestorm Apr 2012 #39
Egalitarian Thug Apr 2012 #9
Aerows Apr 2012 #16
Egalitarian Thug Apr 2012 #20
Aerows Apr 2012 #24
Marrah_G Apr 2012 #33
Aerows Apr 2012 #34
Marrah_G Apr 2012 #77
Egalitarian Thug Apr 2012 #36
Aerows Apr 2012 #37
Kali Apr 2012 #41
Aerows Apr 2012 #46
Kali Apr 2012 #49
Egalitarian Thug Apr 2012 #52
Kali Apr 2012 #57
Egalitarian Thug Apr 2012 #59
Aerows Apr 2012 #61
GoCubsGo Apr 2012 #56
Kali Apr 2012 #58
Egalitarian Thug Apr 2012 #60
Aerows Apr 2012 #75
Aerows Apr 2012 #74
GoCubsGo Apr 2012 #76
Marrah_G Apr 2012 #79
Marrah_G Apr 2012 #78
GoCubsGo Apr 2012 #82
hamsterjill Apr 2012 #30
Aerows Apr 2012 #31
kaiden Apr 2012 #10
Aerows Apr 2012 #15
Egalitarian Thug Apr 2012 #53
Kali Apr 2012 #21
Aerows Apr 2012 #35
Kali Apr 2012 #38
Aerows Apr 2012 #40
Aerows Apr 2012 #47
Kali Apr 2012 #48
safeinOhio Apr 2012 #25
Aerows Apr 2012 #28
slampoet Apr 2012 #26
Ganja Ninja Apr 2012 #42
csziggy Apr 2012 #43
Cleita Apr 2012 #44
Opportunityknocks Apr 2012 #45
RebelOne Apr 2012 #50
Aerows Apr 2012 #69
Rex Apr 2012 #62
Aerows Apr 2012 #71
hack89 Apr 2012 #64
kaiden Apr 2012 #66
Aerows Apr 2012 #68
Autumn Apr 2012 #70
Horse with no Name Apr 2012 #80
Horse with no Name Apr 2012 #81

Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:46 AM

1. might want to check out this group

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to maddezmom (Reply #1)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:52 AM

3. Thanks, maddez :)

 

I appreciate resources!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:49 AM

2. Depending on the type of acreage (pasture, woods, etc.) about 5 acres is good for a horse.

I recommend setting up several small paddocks and rotating the horse through them, or else it will trample the ground in one spot. Make sure your fencing is very sturdy, and be prepared for how smart horses are at figuring out locks, gates, fence weaknesses, etc. when they want to go "visiting" or decide the grass is greener elsewhere. Some electric fencing is often a good idea. Barbed wire is not so good, and never get that wire fencing that is made up of 4"x4" square gaps--they're the perfect size fora hoof to get stuck and major injury to occur.

Lots more advice that I don't have time to give at this moment, but I'm sure other DUers will help you.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to antigone382 (Reply #2)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:53 AM

4. Thank you for your input

 

I am extremely serious about this, and it is helpful to have advice.

Horses ARE intelligent, and I will need to keep that in mind.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to antigone382 (Reply #2)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:00 AM

12. 3 Board horse fencing is traditional. NEVER use barbed wire +100000!

 

If its just one horse, I'm not sure a lot of separate paddocks would be necessary for rotation (although it would be great, it's just more $$). I highly recommend at least one all weather limestone lot for bad weather turnout to preserve turf....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to riderinthestorm (Reply #12)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:21 AM

18. I'm thinking of

 

probably a small herd of goats. Like 5? I'd like to have some dairy goats to help the horse feel more safe, since herding animals do better with others.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to antigone382 (Reply #2)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 03:52 PM

67. I once knew a horse that could open the stall door

and pop the lid off the trash can that held his grain
made himself sick
horses can cost a lot of money when they get sick and or need shoes and stuff

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:53 AM

5. I hope you'll "rescue" rather than "buy".

Your dream is a noble one, and I'm sure that any animal that was lucky enough to have you as a caretaker would be, indeed, fortunate.

Please consider looking into some of the rescue groups for horses rather than buy one. I don't know where you are located in the South, but I'm sure a quick Google search would have some promising results for your general area.

Thank you for your desire to learn about how to best care for the animals prior to homing them. That, to me, shows genuine care, consideration and responsibility.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hamsterjill (Reply #5)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:59 AM

11. I'd love to rescue

 

I just want to make certain that the property the horse is on is suitable and stable. I'm not one to take on responsibilities without making sure I can meet my end of the bargain. That's why I am asking

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hamsterjill (Reply #5)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:32 AM

23. unwise to get a rescue horse

 

horses have memories they flash back to, only experienced horse people should get one. Get an older safe horse and avoid catastrophies. I have trained, bred, and shown horses all my life, I know what I am talking about get rescue pets, yes, but horses can hurt themselves and you. They are flight animals, you dont want to be on an ex-racehorse or abused animal. There is a vast difference.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to larkrake (Reply #23)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:44 AM

27. no, it's not unwise to get a rescue animal

it depends on the quality of the rescue organization.

the good ones have experienced riders evaluate each horse prior to it even being listed for adoption. they also have trainers on staff to continue and supplement training where needed. the person adopting the horse is also evaluated to be sure they are not getting more animal than they can deal with.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:54 AM

6. Expenisve, I would think twice about the horse.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to sarcasmo (Reply #6)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:01 AM

13. Sometimes

 

Money isn't necessarily your objective. I live in the sticks, so I think I am more than capable of providing. If I lived in the city, that would be one thing, but I'm in the country.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:55 AM

7. you might think about volunteering with horse rescue

it would get you through the learning curve without spending your own $$$$$.

The real expense of having horses isn't the initial purchase but rather the on-going care and feeding. Like dogs and cats there are many available for adoption.

Become your dream!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to KurtNYC (Reply #7)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:04 AM

14. That's a good idea

 

I live in the sticks, though, so ...

You have offered an excellent idea. I will examine rescue much more closely. I know I'm kind of weird, but I have ALWAYS wanted a horse. Alternative ways of having one should indeed be high on my priority list.

I want to have some goats, too for dairy.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #14)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:24 AM

19. Don't you have a neighbor you can talk to about this?

I grew up in the sticks and I didn't have to go real far to find somebody with a horse, or a goat, or a lama LOL

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to snooper2 (Reply #19)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:31 AM

22. Uh, my neighbors and I live in the sticks

 

But we also live in a golf course enclave.

Yeah, I just outed myself as ... whatever, but I am trying to do something that is different.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #22)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:46 AM

29. What is a golf course enclave in the sticks? nt

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Snake Alchemist (Reply #29)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 06:40 PM

73. Thanks for making fun of me.

 

I intend to realize my dream, and nothing is going to stand in my way.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #22)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:44 PM

51. Those two things don't go together

you are going to have to give some details..

You want a goat eating around the edges of the golf course you live on in the sticks?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to snooper2 (Reply #51)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:00 PM

55. Don't pick

 

I know that it is unfortunate that I live where I live, but that doesn't mean that I cannot buy property elsewhere.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #55)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:27 PM

63. If they let you have goats where you are go for it

I would start with a couple goats and move up to a horse...

But as noted, goats will eat everything, including the roots. We kept ours on leads around the property when I was growing up. I'd move one from one tree to another once a week on a 30 foot rope. Would be a nice clear 60' diameter circle after just one week LOL

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to snooper2 (Reply #63)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 06:34 PM

72. I'm going to do it

 

They eat everything? LOL. I kind of like the sound of me having goats, even if they eat everything.

I know I'm pretty weird.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #14)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:56 AM

32. I think it's really wonderful that you've always wanted to have a horse and now you're doing it.

 

And I don't know how long "always" has been but how many of
us stop and look, and ask ourselves, what have I always, always
wished .. and then actually pursue it.

Thanks for the inspiration! and on my list of things I've always
wanted to do is at least to spend more time with horses.. you've
just reminded me.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Voice for Peace (Reply #32)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:58 PM

54. I'm trying

 

I hope you get to live out your dream and ride, I'm going to live my dream out, with a little goat farm. It sounds stupid, but that's what I want to do. Maybe some organic chickens. It's not easy to live out such ideas, but I want to try.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #54)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:47 PM

65. doesn't sound stupid at all!

 

don't even say that. it sounds fun, and real.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:55 AM

8. A few questions will help with this decision and your planning...

 

1. Do you plan to keep it out in a pasture with a run-in shed, or have a stall or two?

2. How much land will you have and is it fairly fertile (enough to sustain a grassy grazing area?) The more the better since horses are really destructive on the paddocks. Its hard for me to say exactly how much you'll need without seeing the quality of the turf. I have all weather limestone lots that I use when the ground is really wet so I don't destroy my paddocks. I would REALLY recommend you have at least one or two of those for your animals. A good deep gravel base in your all weather lot is imperative!

3. Do you plan to ride on your property (ie, will you need an arena) or will you mostly be trail riding?

4. You will need hay storage. Even if you think you have enough grazing land, you will still need hay. Lots of people in the biz don't like the hay stored in the barn where the livestock lives since it can mold and become combustible so there's that but even more so, overhead storage is a pain (getting up and down) so wherever you plan to store your hay, try to NOT keep it in a loft.

I've got to go do mid-day chores but will check back in later...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to riderinthestorm (Reply #8)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:19 AM

17. I'm going to sound stupid

 

But all-weather limestone? Not sure what that is, but I'll make sure I have it. I live in the land of hurricanes, and you have to strap down to foundation anything you build.

This is really wonderful that so many people are helping me realize my dream with practical advice!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #17)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:32 PM

39. No question is stupid!! An all-weather "dry" or "Limestone" lot

 

is a smaller fenced area that the horses can be turned out into if your are hoping to preserve your grassy areas. I put mine out there on heavy rain days so the horses don't trash the grass and churn it into a yucky looking mud lot. You do then have to pick the manure droppings up out of there, unlike a grass paddock where you can simply harrow the manure around..... so its more work but it does keep your grass turnout healthier and more attractive.

Our turnout lots have 12 inches of heavy gravel, another 12 inches of smaller gravel, and then 12 inches of limestone on top of that. Sound extreme? Horses are really tough on beating up their turnout areas. I'm in Northern Illinois though. If you are south and your base is sand anyway, you don't have to put in any extra footing - the sand will do just fine.

I second Kali's suggestion downthread that you find someone in your area whose place looks great, whose horses look healthy and ask them for advice. A lot of good horse care and keeping is regional. What I need to do in Northern Illinois for high end performance horses isn't anything like what you are going to presumably want and need. You can also find a local horse vet and ask them for a mentor... they'll know EVERYONE and since they will likely become your horse vet down the line, they won't steer you wrong.

Lastly, right now the prices for horses are wayyyy down. You can probably find one for free or extremely low cost (want one of mine?? LOL) Rescue horses can be a mixed blessing - if you do get one be sure to get someone you trust to help you select it. They are usually given up because they have some significant problems. Try to look for "easy keepers" (low feed, no stress issues like cribbing or stall walking etc, no shoes, fairly injury free). "Bomb proof" is your other criteria - that means they are the same kind of personality whether you ride them 5 days/week or 5 times/year - QUIET! There are "snuggly" horses out there who will come up to you and lay their head across your shoulders but they're pretty rare so don't have any high expectations at first when you go searching. Most of them will be pretty aloof when you first meet them.

This doesn't have to be expensive. You can learn to trim their hooves yourself. Many don't require a lot of grain if they aren't doing a whole lot. If your fencing is of good quality and you have adequate space you should be fine. If you have companion goats, a single horse should also be fine (you don't need 2).

Okay gotta head back out again but next time I really will have more time!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:55 AM

9. More info please. I'm fairly certain that buying the horse is not the dream.

 

What do you want to do with the horse? How much disposable income do you have? how much time do you have? Are you willing to never leave your farm again? How old are you (horses live 25 - 30 years or more)?

Goats are really easy.

I've been around horses goats and other livestock most of my life. My sister was a well known trainer.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #9)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:10 AM

16. Well

 

I like goats. They are really decent animals, and I'd like to raise a few. Not sure what else to say other than to expressly say that. I'd also like to have a horse, and I'd like to raise some goats.

Is that weird?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #16)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:27 AM

20. No. I just wanted to fund out if you've thought it through.

 

We are currently up to our asses in horses that were bought on a whim without considering the reality of horse ownership. What is done to these beautiful animals after Suzie decides she would really rather be a ballerina would literally make you sick (and don't even get me started on the Amish!).

Any livestock is a lifestyle, not a hobby (unless you're fabulously wealthy and intend to just hire a staff so you can go riding when the mood strikes). And while you can get a stunningly nice horse cheap right now, they are a 24/7/365 commitment for decades and the attendant expenses mount up quickly.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #20)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:36 AM

24. To be honest?

 

I'd probably be better off raising some goats first. I'd love to have a horse. I really would, but maybe I'd be better off just taking care of goats, first.

Your experience scares me, and I don't want to be unable to care for the critters I take on. I love animals, and it would kill me to be unable to take care of them.

I think I'll go with my original idea of never riding a horse, but I'll raise goats.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #24)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:57 AM

33. goats are awesome

do some research.... lots of info on them out there, to help you choose what kind you want.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Marrah_G (Reply #33)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:06 PM

34. I think they are awesome

 

But just down thread somebody said they are terrible.

I don't believe it, though.

Is it silly to want to go into my twilight years raising dairy goats on a piece of land I own? I'm 35, but I'd like to get it set up before hand LOL.'

Do you have goats?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #34)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:31 PM

77. I live in an apartment right now, so I don't

When I can finally get out of here I plan to have a couple. My goal is a small organic farm.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #24)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:12 PM

36. There are many opportunities to ride and interact with horses without owning them. I didn't mean to

 

put you off them, but we're pretty involved with caring and adopting out the equine casualties of consumerism. Consider sponsoring a horse at an adoption facility in your area. It's relatively cheap and you get almost all of the advantages of having them yourself. Some of them will let you ride if you already know how, and some give lessons if you don't. Either way you won't regret it. After a few years you will know enough to make an informed decision.

And goats are great! We just lost Blackberry, she lived 18 years, but she gave us so much joy for all that time. Our goats are barn companions for the horses. They need very little maintenance, just don't let them out when you bring your new car home, goat hooves will make it look like you went through the hail storm of the century in 10 seconds. Our friends have them as pets and they live in the house when they're at home. They can be very hard on trees and landscaping has no chance whatsoever, so keep that in mind.

If you get a baby, do yourself and her/him a favor, and have it budded, it seems cruel but those horns will cause so much trouble you will regret it if you don't. One bonus that probably doesn't apply where you live is that they will guarantee that coyotes will go out of their way to avoid your property.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #36)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:19 PM

37. "don't let them out when you bring your new car home"

 

LOL

I'll get my kid budded. I can't help it, I love horizontally eyed friends .

Thanks so much for you input and advice, ET.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #36)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:39 PM

41. ppfftt

goats are coyote bait around here most people have to stay with them all the time and security fence at night or they get picked off pretty fast. even dogs have a hard time protecting sheep and goats from coyotes

and if they don't get them the lions sure as hell will (bears too!)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kali (Reply #41)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:02 PM

46. So I'm not weird for

 

wanting horses and goats?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #46)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:34 PM

49. no, they are often kept together

but do be aware there are bully horses that will bite or kick the shit out of other animals, even kill them - sometimes not even out of meanness, just playing - so make sure the smaller animal has a way to get away if it needs to

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kali (Reply #41)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:45 PM

52. Ah, you live in Cali. You have to keep goats fenced in any case and my place in AZ in right on the

 

coyote highway between the hills where they live and the subdivisions where they feed at night. I've seen our goats kicking coyote ass several times when they have been foolish enough to come over the fence (going after the ducks), so I don't know what kind of goats you've got, but they're not representative of The Mighty Protector Goats we have. The coyotes don't even slow down at our place anymore.

Cats are a whole other issue and no, goats won't stop a hungry cat or a bear.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #52)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:09 PM

57. nope, I'm in AZ too

Cochise county, you?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kali (Reply #57)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:16 PM

59. The AZ prop is Maricopa adjacent to Tonto, New River if you know the area. No cats there.

 

I live in Vegas.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #52)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:20 PM

61. I'm in Mississippi n/t

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kali (Reply #41)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:02 PM

56. I understand that llamas make good protection animals.

I have read that they at least are able to ward off coyotes. I don't know how true that is. Anyone here have any experience on these lines?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to GoCubsGo (Reply #56)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:10 PM

58. burros are pretty good

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kali (Reply #58)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:19 PM

60. I've heard that more than once as well. n/t

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #60)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 07:00 PM

75. This has to be the silliest thing I've ever heard

 

I have a dog. Why in the heavens would you need a llama if you have a dog?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to GoCubsGo (Reply #56)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 06:57 PM

74. You are kidding me

 

I'll take a goat any day over ... you are thinking a llama is protective? I'll pick out a dog first.

Llamas. You have to be pulling my leg.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #74)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 08:02 PM

76. Nope. Why would I kid?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to GoCubsGo (Reply #76)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:41 PM

79. goats...kid....

hehehehe

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #74)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:41 PM

78. Nope- LLama's will protect your sheep/goats

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Marrah_G (Reply #78)

Wed Apr 11, 2012, 06:56 AM

82. They're also bigger and heavier than dogs.

Burros, too. That makes it easier for them to stand up to packs of coyotes.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #16)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:51 AM

30. Baby goats are some of the cutest little creatures!!!

Spanish goats, especially. In my experience (I grew up on a ranch in South Texas), goats are hearty creatures, requiring very little care. Angora's, of course, need to be sheared in the spring, before the hot summer, etc.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hamsterjill (Reply #30)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:55 AM

31. I want dairy goats

 

They are very awesome creatures, and I hope that I can raise them well

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:59 AM

10. If horses are smart, goats are all little Albert Einsteins.

2x4 fencing. Perhaps electric polytape around the top. Goats are easier to raise that horses because goats don't get sick, you can trim their toes yourself and they do like a fine Cabernet at happy hour. Goats browse whereas horses graze. Goats will eat weeds and get a lot of their nutrients from those weeds. Goats also make horses calm and happy -- well, hell, they do that for every species.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kaiden (Reply #10)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:08 AM

15. See - fencing

 

Goats are intelligent, that's kind of why I'd like to have them along with the horse, because as a herd, they function more happily.

I love them, though, and would like to have a few dairy goats, but they are bright (which is also why I like them .

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kaiden (Reply #10)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:48 PM

53. Except sheep. They disdain sheep and rightly assert their superiority at every opportunity.

 


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:30 AM

21. planning to pasture or feed?

for pasture (both actually) the BEST place to get advice is from somebody LOCAL that has a good clean, humane, healthy operation. Ask around. THAT person should become your mentor. Offer to exchange some labor for the knowledge and advice you are wanting.

Horses are variable in terms of what they need - breed, age, type of use, quality of pasture, time of year, etc etc etc. I'm not in the south but I will tell you what I am doing. I have a riding horse, a bit older big and stout. Right now he gets free range on crappy dry pasture 3 or 4 days a week, gets ridden over rocky, hilly "trails" 3 or 4 days/week. Daily gets 10-12 lbs of "senior" formula pellets -@ $20/50 lb sack and free choice alfalfa @ close to $20/bale (about a third of a bale/day). He also gets about a pound daily of calf manna as a supplement. (runs about $30/bag if I recall, not going to look right now)

I'm in a very dry climate so most of the year fly control/manure clean up is of little concern but there are a few months that it gets bad (hopefully that means we have had rain) - your area is likely worse for flies and internal parasites.

I have about a dozen more bums that are on their own, they all look surprisingly good for this time of year and the condition of the range.

goats are a PITA in my opinion - they need staking out or really good pens. they will climb anything - vehicles, buildings, fences, walls. They will also browse any and all landscaping they have access to. They can be good for brush and weed control, but they can beat out an area as bad as a horse too.

Fencing for most horses should be wood with no exposed nails/bolts/etc although most any dedicated horse can find a way to injure itself (and the more they are worth the worse injuries and illnesses will be, trust me)

Make sure you have a large animal vet in the area - they are getting scarce and expensive. (a good large horse facility may have the requisite expertise for most situations but having a number to call for that one bizarre event is good insurance) speaking of insurance - some states may require some kind of liability coverage for either the horse or the property or both - check into that stuff before it is too late.

Horse are large, fast, herding, prey animals - learn their natural behaviors and work with that.

Consider adopting or rescue - especially if you are just looking for a large pet. For a using or riding horse be VERY careful, rescue animals may have serious behavioral problems and beyond that there are a LOT of dipshits trying to sell spoiled ruined animals - lots of scams. Worse than used car salesmen are used horse dealers. BEWARE.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kali (Reply #21)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:08 PM

35. Are goats that terrible?

 

I've had experience with them, and they are intelligent, but their intelligence doesn't make them awful. It just makes them unique and not sheep. I love their eyes and their horizontal pupils.

Maybe that's just me.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #35)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:31 PM

38. I'm biased

prefer bovines.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kali (Reply #38)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:38 PM

40. We all

 

have our preferences, cher.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kali (Reply #21)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:04 PM

47. Thank you for the extended reply

 

It's amazing when you ask a question, and someone answers it. Thank you so much, cher.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Reply #47)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:31 PM

48. we've seen a few abandoned horses/ponies here

it is real easy to get in over your head with a large animal. as mentioned elsewhere, horses are really cheap right now, but feed and maintenance is skyrocketing. so lose a job or the kids are bored with the toy animal and people think they can just let old Beauty "go free" on the "open range". Well, old Beauty has about as much chance as the load of puppies or kittens some other idiot drops off at the end of a dirt road thinking farmer John or Rancher Kali is going to save them and keep them. Not much of a chance if the coyotes get there first or a car runs over them. Might as well be responsible and shoot them yourself. because the alternative is actually worse.

So I tend to be a bit of a downer when I read posts like yours. I sure understand the feeling - I would do just about anything to keep a horse too, but it is an expensive habit for sure!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:38 AM

25. I'd suggest you find

an older, well trained, good disposition gelding. Nothing worse than a green owner and a green horse. Mares can be a handful.
Next, you'll need 2. They don't do well alone. Goats might help and may not, I'm not sure about that.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to safeinOhio (Reply #25)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:45 AM

28. I would like the goats

 

for companionship, since I know horses need it.

I thought that seemed like a good idea, and a sound plan.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 11:42 AM

26. In the 80's my family had 40 acres or land.

Once a year we Split the hay harvest with a farmer down the way who would help us cut dry and bale the hay.

This plus grazing, salt, grain feed and vet bills were the expenses we had for two horses.

This was in the north where you only have one harvest a year.

So it can cost a lot less than people think if you have land and are willing to work hard a couple weeks a year.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:49 PM

42. I know an elderly couple in Inverness FL that just got 2 goats and 2 horses, both rescues.

They have about 4 acres but only about 1/2 an acre is fenced. They feed them hay and commercial feed. The goats are miniature and I highly recommend them. They don't smell as bad as regular goats. Here's a pic
http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSWcaXiMyxCS2lXoxU9VFOOWQOxI9wfzsp7ruUUUkGUu-jHSIq8yw

The horses are Paso fino's and are small in stature but not pony like. They are supposed to have a smooth gate and are comfortable to ride. Here's a pic
http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRkTgAXnFHlQGLjAC2kedl_8WM5WJd7NYk2o3kTLuwz2730dDKK

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:49 PM

43. If you're near Tallahassee Florida, let me know

Buying a horse is a wonderful idea, but remember they are expensive to maintain and they need attention every single day.

I used to teach a class to college students about horse care. The first question was if they really needed/wanted to actually OWN a horse or if other experiences with horses would satisfy their desire to interact with them. The outline for the course is on my website: http://offthehoofhorsemanship.com/index.html but I only have information for "Before You Buy" which is really the most important part to think about now.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 12:58 PM

44. I live in ranch country. Horses, if you take care of them like you are supposed to, are

Last edited Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:47 PM - Edit history (2)

a very expensive hobby especially when it comes to the vet bills. But, I'll tell you what I know. The best horse properties are not on the side of slopes but on the flatlands below the hilly and wooded parts. That's where the best grass grows and where there is more water. Goats will eat everything both weeds and the good grass you want for your horse, so unless you are prepared to separate them, think about that one. Also, goats need a lot of affection, believe it or not, or they won't thrive. They are cute though and great weeders and lawn mowers. One of my neighbors down the road hires hers out to other ranchers for land clean-up work.

However, I have a friend who bought some nice horse property in northern Nevada for a very cheap price. She and her family moved a trailer onto the property, bought a pregnant and neglected mare for a song, and with some tender love and lot's of work brought the mare back to health, delivered a healthy colt and now have a lovely ranch they built with their hands and little money from the bottom up.

Good luck in achieving your dream!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:02 PM

45. I do not have a horse, but I know people who do. They all have horse trailers, a vehicle large

 

enough to pull the trailer w/ horse (it might need to go to a vet one day), several acres of land, and zoning that permits large animals.

They also spend a lot of time grooming, cleaing stables, and giving the horses(s) attention - they like attention just like dogs and cats do.

Does a "golf enclave" have zoning restrictions that may be more strict than the county? For example, I am allowed only one large animal on my four acres, but no one on my road has anything larger than a large dog.

Is there a place nearby to get feed for a horse? If you must travel a long way in the vehicle mentioned earlier it'll cost a lot for fuel.

If you ride the horse, is there a place suitable for such activity? Will the golf enclave let you use their links? Will you need to transport the horse in the trailer with the large vehicle mentioned earlier in order to get a ride in?

If you go w/ goats, some of the same zoning questions may apply.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 01:44 PM

50. I have owned 3 horses, and believe me, they are expensive.

In fact, I would love to own another one now. I do not own any pasture land so I would have to board it, and I cannot afford that.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RebelOne (Reply #50)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 06:15 PM

69. I'd like to own some other animals, to

 

I think I'd be able to sustain some chickens and some goats.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:21 PM

62. Funny, I have a horse for sale.

 

She is an older horse, but very well trained and friendly, my employer is looking to give her a nice home. All you really need is a few acres of grassland, a bag of oats and a water troft. Also you will need grooming material, vet visits etc.. IOW it can become quite expensive.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rex (Reply #62)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 06:19 PM

71. Would she get along well with goats?

 

I'm starting up a farm, so I wouldn't in the least want her to be uncomfortable. Could your mare get by with a handful of dairy goats?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 02:33 PM

64. It is less stressful to simply burn piles of cash - the end result is about the same. nt

Last edited Tue Apr 10, 2012, 05:04 PM - Edit history (1)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 03:34 PM

66. You can haul goats around in cars. This is Ruby.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kaiden (Reply #66)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 06:13 PM

68. Goats are hilarious

 

I love them, they pretty much bring the personality.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 06:17 PM

70. Horses are an expensive obligation and time consuming

You have vet care for shots and worming, farrier expenses hay, grain, supplements and treats. Horses are great companion animals, they like human company and you need to set aside the time to spend grooming them and working them out. In the winter you have the added expense of a heated water trough unless you are into breaking ice and there have been many days we spend a couple of hours clearing snow drifts and going out to the barn twice a day in nasty weather to feed and spend time with them because it soothes them too. Not to mention mucking out the stalls and the paddock area. I love mine and can't imagine living life without them. Goats, to me they are a pain in the ass. We have 40 acres.

Oh and be prepared to keep up with a lot of maintenance on your fences. Nothing worse than seeing a horse get out of the fence and being hit by a truck. We had to stop on the road going into town last week for just that. It was horrible.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aerows (Original post)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:43 PM

80. Excellent resource thread

for goats
http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/goatsperacre.html

Rule of thumb...an acre per horse if it is grazing...you can get by with less if you are supplemental feeding.

This horse grew up on a farm...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Horse with no Name (Reply #80)

Tue Apr 10, 2012, 10:45 PM

81. But let me say this...first

Horses are VERY social animals and they like company. They will cohabitate very well with goats. You don't have to separate them.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread