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Sun Sep 1, 2013, 02:01 PM

 

These young SF professionals choose to live in RVs

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/These-young-SF-professionals-choose-to-live-in-RVs-4778625.php

His Winnebago Rialto, which he bought for $17,000, is 20.8 feet long, about a foot longer than a regulation parking spot. The vehicle gets 17 miles per gallon - and has been meticulously rebuilt.

Tynan Smith, a 32-year-old tech entrepreneur, lives in what he considers his dream Castro district apartment. He's got marble counters, hardwood floors, a cedar closet and gold leaf ceiling. He doesn't have a roommate. And at $500 a month, you can't beat the rent.

The hitch is something he thinks is hardly a hitch: His apartment is a 1996 Winnebago. The rent is for a parking spot and a bit of electricity.

"With the RV, I have a good excuse to design everything really efficiently. If I had a house, would I really put in marble counters? But here it's like 2 feet by 2 feet, so I do," he said, drinking ginger tea he'd bought at the Samovar Tea Lounge nearby. "And then there's the way it makes my life more efficient, more thoughtful."

Smith is among a small slice of young San Francisco professionals who are choosing to live in vehicles - whether it's a large RV or a smaller car - even when they can afford more traditional options (i.e. apartments), albeit not in the trendiest neighborhoods.

These in-vehicle arrangements - usually associated with the homeless - are illegal, and come at a time when the city's housing crisis has pushed many to seek lower-rent options (the average rent for a one-bedroom in the Castro is $2,990 per month). Yet, unlike the homeless, these new vehicle dwellers see their choice as more than financially practical. They talk about the freedom to move, the minimalism that small space requires, and the cred it gives them within the startup community, where there's value in being hard-core and a little weird.







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Reply These young SF professionals choose to live in RVs (Original post)
Liberal_in_LA Sep 2013 OP
arcane1 Sep 2013 #1
BOG PERSON Sep 2013 #2
BOG PERSON Sep 2013 #3
polichick Sep 2013 #4
cbayer Sep 2013 #5
mick063 Sep 2013 #6
dixiegrrrrl Sep 2013 #7
mike_c Sep 2013 #8
Retrograde Sep 2013 #9
Liberal_in_LA Sep 2013 #13
Flatulo Sep 2013 #10
Mopar151 Sep 2013 #11
Piedras Sep 2013 #12
Liberal_in_LA Sep 2013 #14
Piedras Sep 2013 #15
darkangel218 Sep 2013 #16
Boom Sound 416 Sep 2013 #17
Buns_of_Fire Sep 2013 #21
olddots Sep 2013 #18
Zorra Sep 2013 #19
loli phabay Sep 2013 #20

Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 02:17 PM

1. I could almost see myself doing that, especially 10 years ago if I didn't have a cat then

 

Now, I'm barely affording $1,100 a month but it's worth it for the space and sound-proof walls. Plus, the market price is $1,850, so I'm getting a barely affordable deal

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 02:29 PM

2. that must be fun if you're a silicon valley bachelor

not so fun if you and your family are living out of your car

reminds of that story from a week ago about brooklyn hipsters turning dumpsters into living quarters

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Response to BOG PERSON (Reply #2)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 02:39 PM

3. lifestyles of the rich and snarky

[IMG]?1[/IMG]

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 02:44 PM

4. Very cool - and makes sense!

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 02:47 PM

5. There is also a fairly large community of people that live on houseboats.

It's very simiilar and a great way to live, imo.

I love being off the grid (well, except for the internet, lol).

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 02:53 PM

6. This is progress?

 

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 02:58 PM

7. I am curious about the illegal part

I know where there is at least one RV parking place, close to Costco. in Daly City ( just over the So. San Francisco line)
with a lot of RV size "trailers" side by side, all occupied.

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 03:20 PM

8. this is our retirement plan....

Full time, here we come!

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 04:29 PM

9. And at the same site, an article about homeless encampments in San Jose

So living in your RV by choice is cool and hip, whereas living in it by necessity is ???

I suppose an article about people who live in their trucks/vans/RVs because even a $20/hr job doesn't cover Bay Area rents would be old news.

(I do know someone who voluntarily lived in his van for about a year c. 1980, but his reason was that he was traveling for work at least 3 weeks a month and didn't have the time to look for a place. His employer let him park at their office and use the kitchen and shower facilities there, he stored stuff with friends, and when he got a more normal job found an apartment.)

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Response to Retrograde (Reply #9)

Mon Sep 2, 2013, 12:04 AM

13. the series about homeless in San Jose. silicon valley was amazing

 

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 04:50 PM

10. These guys are way ahead of the curve. Their designs are ingenious.

 

http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/

If I was single I'd definitely opt for one of these.

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 05:43 PM

11. A whole lot like those hip little mini-houses.

Really there are folks that have lived like this for years - especially on a seasonal basis, or a job/lifestyle where travel is constant. Look inside the "condo" sleeper of a big rig - there are many this nice.
It's just that these are hip urbanites, and they don't fit into "conventional" urban housing/safety codes, and the infrastructure needed for sanitation and safety is scarce as hen's teeth in an urban setting.

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Sun Sep 1, 2013, 06:07 PM

12. Travel writer Blonde Coyote's USA back country adventures living in a teardrop trailer

Last edited Sun Sep 1, 2013, 06:49 PM - Edit history (1)

I've enjoy reading the adventurous travel stories of The Blonde Coyote, Mary, a young woman who lives in, and works out of, a small teardrop trailer. She travels, with two dogs as her adventure companions, through the back country of the USA. They easily change locations nearly every day. Her photography of her travels is beautifully evocative. Her lifestyle is rent free as she very rarely pays for a camping space and enjoys the great outdoors as her living room and work space. A solar collector on the roof supplies power to her cell phone, notebook computer, and lights in her teardrop trailer. She house sits part of each year...Cape cod...New Mexico. Her's is a rich life by many measures.

The Teardrop Sees America
Last March, my friend Becky and I took a mini-road trip to Carlsbad Caverns in southern New Mexico. While tent camping at nearby Guadalupe National Park, I saw my first Teardrop trailer being towed by a Subaru. I pestered the couple for a tour and walked away convinced that I needed my very own Teardrop. For some time, I had been casting about for the next iteration of my life on the road. After 7 years of living out of my car in between house-sitting gigs, I was craving some personal space, but I wasn’t willing to settle in one place. The teardrop was the perfect solution!

For the next few weeks, I was a woman obsessed: I researched Teardrops, got a tow-hitch installed on my Subaru and scoured Craigslist and all manner of online Teardrop trailer forums before I found a classified ad on Teardrops.net for a homemade Teardrop for sale in Lincoln, Nebraska. This Teardrop was different. Instead of just having a bed inside, it had a little extra space: a full-sized bed with a memory foam mattress and storage space underneath, a fold-up table, two feet of floor space, drawers, cabinets, counter space and a pop-up skylight and a slide-out kitchen/galley area with plenty of storage space for pots, pans and food and a propane burner for cooking.



About theblondecoyote
Mary Caperton Morton is a freelance science and travel writer with degrees in biology and geology and a master’s in science writing. A regular contributor to EARTH magazine, where her favorite beat is the Travels in Geology column, she has also written for the anthologies Best Women's Travel Writing 2010 and Best Travel Writing 2011. Mary is currently traveling the backroads from New Mexico to Alaska, writing and living out of a tiny Teardrop camper. When she’s not at the computer she can usually be found outside -- hiking, climbing mountains and taking photographs. Visit her website at www.marycapertonmorton.com.


Mary, The Blonde Coyote, has scores of well illustrated stories to read and enjoy.

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Response to Piedras (Reply #12)

Mon Sep 2, 2013, 12:05 AM

14. thank u, i will check it out

 

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Reply #14)

Mon Sep 2, 2013, 03:54 PM

15. You're welcome

Hope you enjoy Mary's, The Blonde Coyote, stories and photography of her adventures.

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Mon Sep 2, 2013, 04:04 PM

16. RVs are cool, but not when a storm or tornado comes.

 

We're not in Kansas anymore!

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Mon Sep 2, 2013, 04:16 PM

17. Where do they dump their, you know?

 

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Response to Boom Sound 416 (Reply #17)

Mon Sep 2, 2013, 05:38 PM

21. Most RV parks (and many communities) have dump stations.

When the black water tank (which is where all the You-Know goes) gets about 3/4 full, you pull up to the dump station, hook up your trusty sewer hose, yank the lever, and all the liquified You-Know disappears into their handy hole in the ground. If you've done it right.

If you HAVEN'T done it right, your shoes get a nice You-Know shower. Most RVers have had that experience once. (I say "once" because it's a lesson that most sane people take many pains never to experience twice.)

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Mon Sep 2, 2013, 04:25 PM

18. Muffy & I must have crown molding

 

stainless appliances and walk in closets for our exercise outfits .........

good to see people getting away from the castle mentality .

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Response to Liberal_in_LA (Original post)

Mon Sep 2, 2013, 04:58 PM

19. I've live in my motorhome. Probably lived in it

a total of 7 or 8 years of my life all told, counting living in it while traveling for weeks or months at a time.

It's OK, but it can get really old after awhile, especially living in one for like a year straight. I'm not looking forward to doing it again.

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Response to Zorra (Reply #19)

Mon Sep 2, 2013, 05:05 PM

20. nice thing about being mobile is a different horizon every day

 

Thats the one thing about being stuck living indoors.

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