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Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:05 AM

Statement by Edward Snowden to human rights groups at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport

Edited to include Snowden's entire statement, which includes damning information about how our government is spying on us. The entire statement should be read.

http://wikileaks.org/Statement-by-Edward-Snowden-to.html

Statement by Edward Snowden to human rights groups at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport
Friday July 12, 15:00 UTC

Edward Joseph Snowden delivered a statement to human rights organizations and individuals at Sheremetyevo airport at 5pm Moscow time today, Friday 12th July. The meeting lasted 45 minutes. The human rights organizations included Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch and were given the opportunity afterwards to ask Mr Snowden questions. The Human Rights Watch representative used this opportunity to tell Mr Snowden that on her way to the airport she had received a call from the US Ambassador to Russia, who asked her to relay to Mr Snowden that the US Government does not categorise Mr Snowden as a whistleblower and that he has broken United States law. This further proves the United States Government’s persecution of Mr Snowden and therefore that his right to seek and accept asylum should be upheld. Seated to the left of Mr. Snowden was Sarah Harrison, a legal advisor in this matter from WikiLeaks and to Mr. Snowden’s right, a translator.

Transcript of Edward Joseph Snowden statement, given at 5pm Moscow time on Friday 12th July 2013. (Transcript corrected to delivery)

Hello. My name is Ed Snowden. A little over one month ago, I had family, a home in paradise, and I lived in great comfort. I also had the capability without any warrant to search for, seize, and read your communications. Anyone’s communications at any time. That is the power to change people’s fates.

It is also a serious violation of the law. The 4th and 5th Amendments to the Constitution of my country, Article 12 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and numerous statutes and treaties forbid such systems of massive, pervasive surveillance. While the US Constitution marks these programs as illegal, my government argues that secret court rulings, which the world is not permitted to see, somehow legitimize an illegal affair. These rulings simply corrupt the most basic notion of justice – that it must be seen to be done. The immoral cannot be made moral through the use of secret law.

I believe in the principle declared at Nuremberg in 1945: "Individuals have international duties which transcend the national obligations of obedience. Therefore individual citizens have the duty to violate domestic laws to prevent crimes against peace and humanity from occurring."

Accordingly, I did what I believed right and began a campaign to correct this wrongdoing. I did not seek to enrich myself. I did not seek to sell US secrets. I did not partner with any foreign government to guarantee my safety. Instead, I took what I knew to the public, so what affects all of us can be discussed by all of us in the light of day, and I asked the world for justice.

That moral decision to tell the public about spying that affects all of us has been costly, but it was the right thing to do and I have no regrets.

Since that time, the government and intelligence services of the United States of America have attempted to make an example of me, a warning to all others who might speak out as I have. I have been made stateless and hounded for my act of political expression. The United States Government has placed me on no-fly lists. It demanded Hong Kong return me outside of the framework of its laws, in direct violation of the principle of non-refoulement – the Law of Nations. It has threatened with sanctions countries who would stand up for my human rights and the UN asylum system. It has even taken the unprecedented step of ordering military allies to ground a Latin American president’s plane in search for a political refugee. These dangerous escalations represent a threat not just to the dignity of Latin America, but to the basic rights shared by every person, every nation, to live free from persecution, and to seek and enjoy asylum.

Yet even in the face of this historically disproportionate aggression, countries around the world have offered support and asylum. These nations, including Russia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua, and Ecuador have my gratitude and respect for being the first to stand against human rights violations carried out by the powerful rather than the powerless. By refusing to compromise their principles in the face of intimidation, they have earned the respect of the world. It is my intention to travel to each of these countries to extend my personal thanks to their people and leaders.

I announce today my formal acceptance of all offers of support or asylum I have been extended and all others that may be offered in the future. With, for example, the grant of asylum provided by Venezuela’s President Maduro, my asylee status is now formal, and no state has a basis by which to limit or interfere with my right to enjoy that asylum. As we have seen, however, some governments in Western European and North American states have demonstrated a willingness to act outside the law, and this behavior persists today. This unlawful threat makes it impossible for me to travel to Latin America and enjoy the asylum granted there in accordance with our shared rights.

This willingness by powerful states to act extra-legally represents a threat to all of us, and must not be allowed to succeed. Accordingly, I ask for your assistance in requesting guarantees of safe passage from the relevant nations in securing my travel to Latin America, as well as requesting asylum in Russia until such time as these states accede to law and my legal travel is permitted. I will be submitting my request to Russia today, and hope it will be accepted favorably.

If you have any questions, I will answer what I can.

Thank you.


21 replies, 3388 views

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Arrow 21 replies Author Time Post
Reply Statement by Edward Snowden to human rights groups at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport (Original post)
chimpymustgo Jul 2013 OP
demosincebirth Jul 2013 #1
chimpymustgo Jul 2013 #6
allin99 Jul 2013 #10
morningfog Jul 2013 #7
demosincebirth Jul 2013 #12
morningfog Jul 2013 #13
BREMPRO Jul 2013 #20
Autumn Jul 2013 #2
ProSense Jul 2013 #3
Catherina Jul 2013 #4
chimpymustgo Jul 2013 #8
morningfog Jul 2013 #5
allin99 Jul 2013 #9
morningfog Jul 2013 #11
allin99 Jul 2013 #15
bunnies Jul 2013 #14
chimpymustgo Jul 2013 #16
Catherina Jul 2013 #17
Catherina Jul 2013 #18
cantbeserious Jul 2013 #19
Catherina Jul 2013 #21

Response to chimpymustgo (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:09 AM

1. Ed, you can "cry me a river."

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Response to demosincebirth (Reply #1)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:11 AM

6. This man is a true hero. As an American citizen, I am grateful for his bravery and sacrifice.

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Response to chimpymustgo (Reply #6)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:23 AM

10. i no longer hesitate to agree with that. The U.S. behavior in this...

has confirmed that, from Clapper lying to their desperate attempts to silence him.

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Response to demosincebirth (Reply #1)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:12 AM

7. What if he proves the claim that he can read anybody's communications?

 

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Response to morningfog (Reply #7)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:25 AM

12. What if he can't. then what?

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Response to demosincebirth (Reply #12)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:26 AM

13. The claim would fail.

 

Now, if he does prove it, how would you feel about it?

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Response to morningfog (Reply #13)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 12:13 PM

20. its a bold claim and one that has yet to be proven

from my understanding if he wanted to actually read the communications, by law and statute, he would need probable cause and a warrant for FISA court for specific communication content, as it is it's just metadata with no detail. But if in fact it COULD be read or shared by him, or anyone with an inclination to do so in a privately outsources security state should give us pause and reflect on the wisdom of such programs that so far have proved little effectiveness in their goals.. I've heard about a few anecdotal cases where it might have helped prevent terrorist activity, but what about the Marathon bombing bro's ?? if they were scooping up all this data and looking for key words why didn't they get flagged and investigated??

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Response to chimpymustgo (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:09 AM

2. Recommended

Thank you.

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Response to chimpymustgo (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:11 AM

3. That's

I believe in the principle declared at Nuremberg in 1945: "Individuals have international duties which transcend the national obligations of obedience. Therefore individual citizens have the duty to violate domestic laws to prevent crimes against peace and humanity from occurring."

Accordingly, I did what I believed right and began a campaign to correct this wrongdoing. I did not seek to enrich myself. I did not seek to sell US secrets. I did not partner with any foreign government to guarantee my safety. Instead, I took what I knew to the public, so what affects all of us can be discussed by all of us in the light of day, and I asked the world for justice.

...too rich. He revealed U.S. state secrets to other countries.

The ACLU's own text contradicts its case for Snowden's asylum bid.
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10023231312



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Response to chimpymustgo (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:11 AM

4. Thanks for starting a thread for this (Rec'd)

Last edited Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:43 AM - Edit history (1)

Thanks for starting a thread for this. I linked it in my last OP

I'm going to follow a few more tweets before digesting the whole statement.

This is annoying. HRW pissed me off before, but now they're just on my shitlist. They kept journalists and videocameras out. What does HRW do? They tweet almost nothing of relevance but send out a picture

Gregor Peter ‏@L0gg0l

#SNOWDEN PHOTO SHOWING HIM STANDING AND LOOKING DOWN via @hrw's @TanyaLokshina


https://twitter.com/L0gg0l/statuses/355695149243830273


and it's not too difficult to guess who shot this film

Update, 11:15 a.m.: Russia's Life News got a snippet of video from the meeting, surreptitiously recorded by a participant (somewhat ironically). A preview:

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/global/2013/07/snowden-calls-meeting-human-rights-groups/67110/#vid



I really dislike HRW. Too political for the US.

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Response to Catherina (Reply #4)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:14 AM

8. Thanks for possting the rest. It is quite damning.

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Response to chimpymustgo (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:11 AM

5. This claim, if true, is huge and damaging.

 

"I also had the capability without any warrant to search for, seize, and read your communications. Anyone’s communications at any time."

If true, I don't see how ANYONE could defend it if not on the PR payroll of the WH or NSA.

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Response to morningfog (Reply #5)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:21 AM

9. Plenty of people here would defend it.

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Response to allin99 (Reply #9)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:24 AM

11. I just wonder how they could.

 

Both how they could in good conscience and what argument they would make.

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Response to morningfog (Reply #11)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:29 AM

15. The argument they would make is...

the person who says it has a girlfriend with a pole in her house, therefore it is okay b/c women with poles in their house are bad women.

and in good conscience b/c they never opposed fisa or the patriot act in the first place, i think it is people's expectations that all people on a democrat board would find it objectionable, but now you can see that plenty of democrats are for Fisa and the patriot act as they stand. Have you ever seen the snowden boxes crowd say otherwise? i mean in the past?

they probably just oppose abortion laws and maybe...dunno. lol.

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Response to morningfog (Reply #5)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:28 AM

14. If true.

 

Indeed. Thats one hell of a claim.

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Response to bunnies (Reply #14)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:44 AM

16. Scary, damning and indefensible.

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Response to chimpymustgo (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:57 AM

17. The Nuremberg principle is true "Individuals have duty to violate domestic laws to prevent crimes"

"I believe in the principle declared at Nuremberg in 1945: "Individuals have international duties which transcend the national obligations of obedience. Therefore individual citizens have the duty to violate domestic laws to prevent crimes against peace and humanity from occurring.""


"I did what I believed right and began a campaign to correct this wrongdoing. I did not seek to enrich myself. I did not seek to sell US secrets. I did not partner with any foreign government to guarantee my safety. Instead, I took what I knew to the public, so what affects all of us can be discussed by all of us in the light of day, and I asked the world for justice."


That moral decision to tell the public about spying that affects all of us has been costly, but it was the right thing to do and I have no regrets.


Helluva statement Edward Snowden!

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Response to chimpymustgo (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 11:03 AM

18. There are two threads about the statement. I'm proud to recommend both!

Tow threads discussing the Statement are:
ChimpyMustGo: Statement by Edward Snowden to human rights groups at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport
LuminousAnimal: Snowden's statement

I'm still digesting this statement while trying to keep up with twitter duties.

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Response to chimpymustgo (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 11:34 AM

19. Thank You For Sharing - Kick And Recomnend

eom

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Response to chimpymustgo (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 04:12 PM

21. Surreptitiously filmed video

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