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Thu Oct 14, 2021, 09:59 PM

Travelers, Welcome to the Revolution in Overhead Bin Size

Everything’s tight in an airplane cabin. But when there is adequate room, travel sure gets easier. Take overhead bins.

Boeing and Airbus both manufacture new single-aisle airplanes that have much larger overhead bins—enough space for all passengers to put a roll-aboard bag on its side. The bins, launched six years ago by Alaska Airlines on Boeing’s 737, have been a huge hit with customers, and airlines.

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Space in overhead bins is so prized that people stay loyal to an airline just for early boarding status, which doesn’t get you much except for available bin space. Some passengers pay extra for early boarding just to avoid having to check a bag. Woe be the passenger who has to endure the walk of shame back to the front of the packed plane and have his or her carry-on bag checked.

For years airlines were selling ticket-holders false hope. Everyone gets to bring one carry-on bag and one personal item such as a purse or backpack. But the truth was if everyone brought their full allocation, there wasn’t enough bin space. That simple math got a lot worse for passengers when airlines crammed more seats into their jets, reducing legroom and pushing heads closer together with thin webbing in seat backs instead of thick foam. American went from 148 seats on a Boeing 737-800 to 160 and now 172. The bins didn’t get any bigger, so more passengers were competing for the same overhead bin space. It got even worse when most airlines started charging fees to check bags in 2008 and passengers responded by loading up free carry-ons.

Alaska asked Boeing to come up with a solution. Engineers at Boeing had already been working on ideas to reroute wiring and pipes in the ceiling and create more bin space. The taller Space Bins sit 2 inches lower, reducing some headroom, and pivot up and away from the aisle as they are pushed up into the ceiling. A standard 60-inch bin can carry four bags laid flat, Boeing says. The 60-inch Space Bin can carry six turned on their side. The most common 737, the 737-800 and its newer same-size version, the 737 MAX 8, has room for 118 bags in standard configuration, Boeing says. With Space Bins, the 737 MAX 8 can carry 178 bags—enough for the 172 passengers American packs in.

Boeing says about half of all MAX deliveries have the bigger bins installed. It is an option for airlines—and some still don’t want them. Southwest, for example, is sticking with standard bins because it offers two free checked bags and doesn’t want pack rats in the cabin.

More..

https://www.wsj.com/articles/travelers-welcome-to-the-revolution-in-overhead-bin-size-11634119200 (subscription)




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Response to question everything (Original post)

Thu Oct 14, 2021, 11:09 PM

1. max 8 - bigger bins for that nose dive into the earth nt

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Response to question everything (Original post)

Thu Oct 14, 2021, 11:37 PM

2. As someone who has traveled frequently and ran thru airports to catch a connecting flight

I learned a carry on really slowed me down. I’ve gotten over time now to all but despise ppl with their carry ons...not all but geez they are rude!

Besides, you can’t wait 5-10 minutes for a bag? Really

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Response to PortTack (Reply #2)

Fri Oct 15, 2021, 08:56 AM

5. As long as the checked bags make it to the final destination, especially

when there are connections.

Many years ago before all the regulations, I was on my way for a consult and the client paid and selected the flights.

I had two carryons and then there was going to be a delay which would meant I would miss my connection. But I knew that around the same time there was another direct flight by a different carrier going to my final destination.

I grabbed my carryons and asked the flight attendant to transfer me to the other flight and it was done.

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Response to PortTack (Reply #2)

Fri Oct 15, 2021, 10:49 AM

6. At what airport

do you get your bags in 5 - 10 minutes?

Maybe smaller airports but flying in and out of one of the 10 busiest airports in the US, I NEVER got my bags in 5 to 10 minutes even after walking for 5 to 10 minutes from the gate to baggage claim!

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Response to drmeow (Reply #6)

Fri Oct 15, 2021, 11:11 PM

7. O'Hare usually within 20 mins. Tampa INTL, sky harbor maybe 15.

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Response to PortTack (Reply #7)

Sat Oct 16, 2021, 08:07 PM

9. You must have flown better airlines at sky harbor than I did

There were times when bags didn't even start to show until I'd been in baggage claim for 15 minutes!

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Response to question everything (Original post)

Fri Oct 15, 2021, 04:13 AM

3. I sure don't welcome it.

The big crush in carry-ons mostly was a result of the airlines squeezing passengers for checked bags. Cheap flights for $150 one way got a lot more expensive when airlines started tacking on 50% and more to check bags. Of COURSE they tried fitting everything into super-sized carry-ons. So these things, often heavier than the passengers themselves, would prove too much for the latches, fall onto the laps or heads of other passengers if the latches weren't up to the task. I've seen small children scream in pain as some carry-on suitcase full of heavy whatever suddenly bucked a latch and fell onto the child unfortunate enough to be sitting in the "wrong" seat.

This "solution" will only provide for far more weight to be stored into the overhead bins, with every defective latch (and you KNOW there always be some) a potential painful, or even crippling injury.

Here in Europe, it varies widely with the speed of delivery after landing, so that is an issue here as well. In small provincial airports, the bags are delivered fairly quickly, but in some larger airports, especially in France and Span, it can take up to 45 minutes or more. Even in Frankfurt, I once had to wait over an hour for my bags from Washington because some idiot put them on the wrong conveyor belt. No one on the flight from Kazakhstan seemed to want to take my bags home, but no airport worker seemed interested in finding out where they should have gone, either.

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Response to DFW (Reply #3)

Fri Oct 15, 2021, 06:34 AM

4. I worked as an interior mechanic for one of the majors

For several years. Every 20 days we'd get another airframe in for a heavy check.

Usually the heavy check came in every couple of years.

At one point I recall we were changing close to 9 out of every 10 latches due to cracking in the latch handles.

I don't think people really understand how much weight is above their heads secured by a single latch... and that single latch is attached to a piece of honeycomb fibreglass...

That's why I always take the window seat...when and if that latch fails the people in the aisle seats are going to get hurt the worst.

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Response to bluecollar2 (Reply #4)

Fri Oct 15, 2021, 11:12 PM

8. Same here...always go with the window seat.

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