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Wed Jun 9, 2021, 08:48 PM

NYC Mayor: Is There Any Time Left for Maya Wiley?

New Yorker

Wiley, who is now running for mayor, dislikes it when reporters ask her about the de Blasio administration. Her aides told me this several times. Wiley herself told me as soon as we met, earlier this week, in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park. I had proposed talking to her about the past eight years of city politics and how they have shaped her own mayoral ambitions. The current Mayor accomplished much of what he’d promised, including universal pre-K, the end of stop-and-frisk, and a fifteen-dollar minimum wage. And yet he had confounded many of his original supporters with his difficult public persona, his transactional methods, and his wayward Presidential ambitions. He had come into office pledging to rein in the N.Y.P.D., but, by the end of his tenure, he was defending the department even in the face of videos showing police officers assaulting Black Lives Matter marchers. New Yorkers’ mixed feelings about de Blasio will surely influence their choice of Democrat to run City Hall next year, and Wiley, it seemed, was uniquely positioned to understand this ambivalence: she’d been on the inside, had a hand in the administration’s early achievements, and left disappointed. But, before we were done shaking hands, Wiley told me that she hated my angle. “You’re asking a Black woman running for office about a white man’s record?” she said. “Come on.”

We sat down at a shaded picnic table under a tree; people passed by, walking their dogs. “Look, there’s one progressive in this race who can win this race,” she said. “And it’s me.” “Progressive,” as even Wiley concedes, is a stretchy term. Pretty much every candidate in the crowded Democratic primary has invoked it at some point in the past six months. Three of those candidates—Eric Adams, Kathryn Garcia, and Andrew Yang—are outpacing Wiley in polls. Adams and Yang also have an edge over her in fund-raising. Garcia has been riding high since receiving the Times’ endorsement, in May. All three are running on platforms that propose measures which could be called progressive—Yang’s “People’s Bank of New York,” for instance, or Adams’s call for adding hundreds of thousands of affordable apartments to the city’s housing stock. But all three have rejected arguments made by activists, reform groups, and the city’s upstart new left on issues ranging from policing to education and development. And all three have courted constituencies opposed to progressive goals.

Wiley has courted the activists. Only a fraction of the city’s voters will cast ballots in this year’s Democratic primary, and even a small edge with one reliable voting group could make a difference. Early in the race, Wiley seemed well positioned to attract the kind of coalition that had elected de Blasio: Black communities from across the city plus “very liberal” voters of all races. With only a few weeks to go, many Black voters appear more receptive to Adams, a former N.Y.P.D. captain long involved in the city’s debates over policing. Among reform-minded lefty voters, allegiances are split. Two other candidates who occupied the capital-“P” progressive space, Scott Stringer and Dianne Morales, had recently had their campaigns upended: Stringer when a former campaign volunteer accused him of making unwanted advances twenty years ago (on Friday, a second woman, who worked at a Manhattan bar Stringer once co-owned, came forward with similar accusations); Morales when several members of her campaign staff quit and others organized a work stoppage. For a lot of Morales’s and Stringer’s voters, Wiley said, “I was already their No. 2.”

Several of Wiley’s opponents have argued that the de Blasio administration was, on the whole, a failure. Yang bashes the Mayor every chance he gets, as does Garcia, the former Sanitation Department commissioner who served as a top official in de Blasio’s administration much longer than Wiley did. In October, Politico described the speech Wiley delivered at her campaign launch as a “searing rebuke of de Blasio,” but, sitting across from me, she took pains not to criticize her old boss directly. “We voted for the progressive twice, because the progressive got things done for people who desperately needed him to produce. And he did.”

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Reply NYC Mayor: Is There Any Time Left for Maya Wiley? (Original post)
brooklynite Jun 9 OP
Budi Jun 9 #1
zentrum Jun 9 #2
frazzled Jun 10 #3

Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Wed Jun 9, 2021, 08:53 PM

1. Ummmm. Still a No.

Garcia is my choice.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Wed Jun 9, 2021, 09:00 PM

2. She's got my vote.

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Response to zentrum (Reply #2)

Thu Jun 10, 2021, 12:12 AM

3. You have to vote for more than one candidate

Well, you can vote for just one, but unless they are one of the top vote getters, your ballot will be “exhausted” and not be counted. Worse, it could skew the eventual results.

You can vote for Wiley by ranking her first, but if you don’t continue to rank at least some of the more likely candidates as second or third choices, someone may end up winning that you don’t like at all.

See this article for a detailed explanation of how that works, and how not ranking the full number of candidates can skew results:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/28/us/politics/ranked-choice-voting-new-york-mayoral-race.html

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