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Sun Apr 25, 2021, 10:14 AM

More info on Biden's plan to increase the EV charging network

Today, the White House announced new progress on the Administrationís goal to accelerate and deploy electric vehicles and charging stations, create good-paying, union jobs, and enable a clean transportation future. This includes actions by federal agencies:

-- The Department of Transportation announced guidance on how grants can be used to deploy charging infrastructure and newly designated alternative fuel corridors;
-- The Department of Energy announced new funding and partnerships for charger-related research and development; and
-- The General Services Administration announced progress on the goal to transition the federal fleet to zero-emission vehicles.

In March, the United States passed the milestone of 100,000 public chargers (as recorded by the Department of Energyís Alternative Fuel Data Center) and these new actions will accelerate deployment to make driving an electric vehicle convenient in every part of the country.





more here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/04/22/fact-sheet-biden-administration-advances-electric-vehicle-charging-infrastructure/


This is great. Lots of money to further build out the network, plus they recognize the need to provide charging for those without home charging, such as apartment dwellers.

22 replies, 645 views

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Arrow 22 replies Author Time Post
Reply More info on Biden's plan to increase the EV charging network (Original post)
tinrobot Apr 25 OP
rgbecker Apr 25 #1
tinrobot Apr 25 #2
Miguelito Loveless Apr 25 #6
MineralMan Apr 25 #3
tinrobot Apr 25 #9
Miguelito Loveless Apr 25 #13
beaglelover Apr 25 #20
abqtommy Apr 25 #4
dalton99a Apr 25 #5
Miguelito Loveless Apr 25 #7
tinrobot Apr 25 #10
Miguelito Loveless Apr 25 #12
MissB Apr 25 #8
zeusdogmom Apr 25 #11
tinrobot Apr 25 #14
zeusdogmom Apr 25 #15
tinrobot Apr 25 #16
zeusdogmom Apr 26 #22
bello Apr 25 #17
tinrobot Apr 25 #18
bello Apr 25 #19
WarGamer Apr 25 #21

Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 10:23 AM

1. Don't know much about electric cars....

I've seen chargers at various parking lots, but since I don't have an electric car yet I haven't looked closer into how they work. Do people use a credit card to pay for a charge? Is the rate per/KW the same paid for electricity at home? Or is it for free?

It seems that a lot more will have to be done to get to the many that don't have an assigned parking spot next to a charger as you suggest...apartment dwellers etc.

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Response to rgbecker (Reply #1)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 10:31 AM

2. Yes, one of each.

Do people use a credit card to pay for a charge? Is the rate per/KW the same paid for electricity at home? Or is it for free?


Some chargers take cards, some use apps, some are totally free. In California, they put free chargers at all the highway rest stops, for example. Many shopping centers/malls have free charging.

If they do charge, usually it is per kWh of power, but some charge by time spent at the charger.


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Response to rgbecker (Reply #1)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 10:58 AM

6. There are three types of EVSE (EV Service Equipment)

Last edited Sun Apr 25, 2021, 12:04 PM - Edit history (1)

(I am greatly simplifying some details)

Level 1 - Uses standard 110v service you find everywhere. EVs come with this so you can plug in anywhere you can find an electrical outlet. While ubiquitous, it is very slow, 3-5 miles per hour of charging.

Level 2 - 220-240v hardwired or plug in (like your dryer socket). It can put 15-25 miles of range back per hour of charging. (Correction: some chargers can manage up to 45 miles per hour if amperage is high enough and onboard AC charger rated high enough)

Quick/Superchargers (sometime called Level 3) - Operate at 400-800v and can charge a battery to 80% capacity in 20-30 minutes.

The first two can be installed/used in homes, the third is an expensive, utility grade set up. The last one is generally always charged for (except early Tesla buyers) and is either charged by the minutes, or by the kWh. Tesla chargers simply plug and play, charging your credit card on file. Other charging networks have a variety of payment schemes.

Some businesses provide free L2 charging at grocery stores, big box stores, restaurants, movie theaters, etc.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 10:33 AM

3. That's a lot of Interstate Highways Still "Pending,"

it seems to me. Long-distance driving, apparently, still is in the planning stages, it looks like.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #3)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 11:34 AM

9. The map is inaccurate. Most of those are already covered and/or under construction.

All those dots have been covered by Electrify America. Heck, even South Dakota is installing chargers along the I-90 corridor.

Wyoming still needs some work.

For a more accurate map, look here:

https://www.plugshare.com/

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #3)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 12:00 PM

13. No problems driving cross-country

With Tesla, requires planning with CCS charger, with CHAdeMO much harder.

Things improving daily as EV fleets increase in sixe, which I am hoping Biden admin will speed up.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #3)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 08:35 PM

20. You can easily drive across the country in a Tesla.

They have an awesome charging network and they are continually adding more charging centers.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 10:52 AM

4. I knew I'd get a charge out of Joe's Presidency. See Joe Go. Go, Joe, Go!

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 10:55 AM

5. And don't let one company dictate the standards


No first-mover advantage

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Response to dalton99a (Reply #5)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 11:01 AM

7. In US, there are three standards

Tesla (Proprietary, easiest to use, ubiquitous and reliable)
CCS (2nd most common)
CHAdeMO - Least common, mostly found in Japanese brands

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Response to Miguelito Loveless (Reply #7)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 11:38 AM

10. CCS will soon dominate.

The Feds, States, and every other car company are putting their money into CCS. Too much momentum for Tesla to overcome.

There are already more CCS plugs in the US, but Tesla does still have a better customer experience. It's a good selling point for them.

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Response to tinrobot (Reply #10)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 11:57 AM

12. Agreed.

Tesla already adding CCS in Europe. It might consider opening up itís chargers as a premium service for CCS drivers, but must balance crowding out its own customers. Tesla has excellent reliability rating, other providers, not so much.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 11:08 AM

8. This is good

I can find some charging stations in some pretty far-off-the-highway cities around here. We are likely to be buying an all electric either this year or next (Volvo). Having a better network of charging stations is a good move.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 11:50 AM

11. I like the idea of electric cars and would love one for local driving

But at this point my long distance trips to visit family would be really, really tricky. Long stretches of nothing - small towns, no rest stops. How long would it take me to recharge at a small Kwik Stop? Plus the idea of hanging around killing time while my car charges is not the least bit appealing. I understand the kinks will eventually be worked out, but knowing I need to replace my car within the next few months - it wonít be electric.

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Response to zeusdogmom (Reply #11)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 02:08 PM

14. Yes, charging on road trips is somewhat less convenient than gas.

Gas will almost always be faster to refuel. But one of the reasons I bought an EV was to stop giving so much of my money to companies like Exxon and to also stop supporting oil wars. I figure a little less convenience is part of that process.

I've also found that the longer stops allow me to relax and stretch my legs a bit more, which makes the overall trip a lot more pleasant.

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Response to tinrobot (Reply #14)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 02:30 PM

15. Are you driving major highways in heavier populated areas

Or are you driving the great swaths of rural? Iím curious because Iím no fan of Exxon et al. How long are your stops? Iím usually good to fill up the gas tank, use the restroom and be on my way. Maybe a cup of coffee to go. Another question: how many miles to the charge?

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Response to zeusdogmom (Reply #15)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 03:22 PM

16. Normally I drive within the city. 95% of my charging is at home.

My car has a 250+ mile range, so if I go more than half that, then I'll charge on the road.

On the road, charging stops are 15-45 minutes, depending on a number of factors. Typical is 20-30 for me. I just did a 300+ mile road trip and stopped once in the middle to charge for about 30 minutes. Charging is getting faster with the newer cars.

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Response to tinrobot (Reply #16)

Mon Apr 26, 2021, 09:13 AM

22. Thanks for the info tinrobot

I am going to pay close attention to existing charging stations on my next trip. Obviously I am collecting pro/con data for a very major purchase.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 04:28 PM

17. The next step...

While a nation-wide charging network will be a great step forward, the next order of magnitude development will be widely available, cheap and efficient vehicle-to-grid (V2G) smart controller/chargers.

V2Gs will allow the homeowner to charge the car at night during low electric rates and sell it back to the grid during high rate times. They will provide the homeowner with backup power during outages. They will optimize any solar array the owner may have or may want to add.

By reducing peak demand and increasing minimum utilization, V2G will make the grid more robust and reliable. But donít expect the utility companies to embrace the perceived loss of control.

It will be interesting and fun to watch how this all develops. What is your prediction? -B

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Response to bello (Reply #17)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 05:39 PM

18. Tesla, Hyundai, and VW are impementing it

All either have it or plan to roll it out in the next year.

At first implementation, the car could become the equivalent of Tesla's Powerwall, which is a local home energy storage solution. It'll store power from your solar panels, offset power draw from utilities during peak hours, and also augment power to your house in case of a blackout.

The next step is to get power companies on board and allow storage to be sold back to the grid. That could cut into power company profits and become a political issue.

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Response to tinrobot (Reply #18)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 08:31 PM

19. "Get the power companies on board."

Yeah, that ďnext stepĒ is what I wonder about.

Currently, my grid provider has the right to limit the solar capacity that I can install. Basically, they donít want me producing more than I use.

However, they currently (no pun intended) have all the power (no pun intended) in the relationship. They can play with ďpeak pricingĒ, net power pricing period (over day, month or year) and the like. The one thing I get out of the deal is a net meter that runs both ways.

If I were to add an EV with a smart V2G controller, I would not produce any more power, but I could control the power that I create in a way that would dramatically change the balance of power in the relationship.

Fun times ahead. I wonder how it will play out. -B

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Sun Apr 25, 2021, 09:47 PM

21. I'm holding options contracts for ChargePoint and other EV charging Co's...

Along with some Lithium companies...

And Plug Power and Fuel Cell...

Gonna be a great year.

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