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Fri Mar 12, 2021, 12:36 PM

Are We Doing The Fall Of Rome All Over Again?

This article was published online on March 11, 2021.

The scenes at the capitol on January 6 were remarkable for all sorts of reasons, but a distinctive fall-of-Rome flavor was one of them, and it was hard to miss. Photographs of the Capitol’s debris-strewn marble portico might have been images from eons ago, at a plundered Temple of Jupiter. Some of the attackers had painted their bodies, and one wore a horned helmet. The invaders occupied the Senate chamber, where Latin inscriptions crown the east and west doorways. Commentators who remembered Cicero invoked the senatorial Catiline conspiracy. Headlines referred to the violent swarming of Capitol Hill as a “sack.”

Outside, a pandemic raged, recalling the waves of plague that periodically swept across the Roman empire. As the nation reeled, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in the role of a magister militum addressing the legions, issued an unprecedented advisory that put the sitting ruler on notice, condemning “sedition and insurrection” and noting that the inauguration of a new ruler would proceed. Amid all this came a New York Times report on the discovery and display of artifacts from the gardens of Caligula, an erratic and vengeful emperor, one of whose wives was named Milonia.

Ever since Edward Gibbon’s The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, the prospect of a Rome-inflected apocalypse has cast its chilling spell. Britain’s former American colonies, which declared their independence the year Gibbon’s first volume was published, have been especially troubled by the parallels they discerned. The Founders feared the stealthy creep of tyranny. Half a century later, the narrative progression of The Course of Empire, Thomas Cole’s allegorical series of paintings, depicted the consequences of overweening ambition and national hubris. Today, as ever, observers are on the alert for portents of the Last Days, and have been quick, like Cato, to hurl warnings. And of course there are some Americans—including the January 6 attackers—who would find national collapse momentarily satisfying. “Sack Rome?” a barbarian wife says to her husband in an old New Yorker cartoon. “That’s your answer to everything.”

The comparisons, of course, can be facile. A Roman state of some sort lasted so long—well over a millennium—and changed so continuously that its history touches on any imaginable type of human occurrence, serves up parallels for any modern event, and provides contradictory answers to any question posed. Still, I am not immune to preoccupation with the Roman past. A decade and a half ago, I published a book called Are We Rome? The Fall of an Empire and the Fate of America, which looked closely at the age-old Rome-and-America comparison. The focus was mainly on themes that transcend partisan politics, but it was also written at a particular moment, and reflected certain brute realities: The country was mired in Iraq and Afghanistan; fear and suspicion of foreigners were on the rise; and public functions of all kinds (maintaining highways, operating prisons, providing security) were being privatized. All of this had echoes in Rome’s long story.

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https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2021/04/no-really-are-we-rome/618075/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+TheAtlantic+(The+Atlantic+-+Master+Feed)

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Response to LiberalArkie (Original post)

Fri Mar 12, 2021, 01:14 PM

1. The author has a nice presentation.

He examines the long arc of the [an] empire's history in a manner similar to explaining how a river can flow in opposite directions at the same time.

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Response to LiberalArkie (Original post)

Fri Mar 12, 2021, 01:19 PM

2. Not every historian takes the allegory as far as it can go.

It's important to remember that while the city of Rome fell, the Empire never really did. At least not until over a thousand years later. The Rome of the Caesars evolved into the Byzantine Empire. And although the Byzantines spoke Greek and worshipped Christ, they considered themselves the Roman Empire.

The Rome of 23 b.c. and the Rome of 1453 a.d. could scarcely be more different from one another, but they were both the Roman Empire.

It's entirely likely, by this measurement, that the USA won't "fall" so much as evolve into something else.

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Response to LiberalArkie (Original post)

Fri Mar 12, 2021, 01:22 PM

3. *** YES !!!*** What will America look like if the people who want insurrection are back in control?

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Response to LiberalArkie (Original post)

Fri Mar 12, 2021, 02:01 PM

4. What we should be looking at is the end of the Roman Republic, not the Roman Empire

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Response to LiberalArkie (Original post)

Fri Mar 12, 2021, 02:48 PM

5. The parallels with the last decades of the Austro-Hungarian Empire are much closer

From being the dominant power on the continent at the end of the Napoleonic Wars, the Hapsburg Empire steadily lost ground to Britain, France and Prussia through the 19th century hampered by divisions of geography, religion, language, and class. The parliament became non-functional, the Emperor became senile, and the military sleepwalked into World War I.

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