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Tue Sep 15, 2020, 02:12 PM

I am wondering whether the West Coast--especially CA--the Gulf Coast, and much of

the East Coast, especially the Southeastern part of the country, will soon become unlivable because of fire, hurricanes, and flooding.

If I lived in California, the fires would cause me to leave. Fires scare me more than almost anything. But the flooding in other places might cause me to consider moving, too.

Yes, Kansas has tornadoes, but at least thus far the patch of ground where I live has largely been spared.




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Reply I am wondering whether the West Coast--especially CA--the Gulf Coast, and much of (Original post)
tblue37 Sep 15 OP
Binkie The Clown Sep 15 #1
still_one Sep 15 #2
BamaRefugee Sep 15 #5
SoCalNative Sep 15 #6
BamaRefugee Sep 17 #9
SoCalNative Sep 17 #11
BamaRefugee Sep 17 #12
SoCalNative Sep 17 #14
ariesgem Sep 15 #7
BamaRefugee Sep 17 #10
True Blue American Sep 15 #3
sarcasmo Sep 15 #4
WyattKansas Sep 15 #8
Codeine Sep 17 #13
smirkymonkey Sep 17 #15
Blue_true Sep 17 #17
smirkymonkey Sep 17 #18
leftyladyfrommo Sep 17 #19
Klaralven Sep 17 #23
Blue_true Sep 17 #16
Kaleva Sep 17 #20
Blue_true Sep 17 #26
Kaleva Sep 17 #27
Blue_true Sep 17 #29
Klaralven Sep 17 #21
shanti Sep 17 #22
tinrobot Sep 17 #24
JI7 Sep 17 #25
Raine Sep 17 #28

Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Tue Sep 15, 2020, 02:14 PM

1. I read somewhere that quite a few non-survivable zones are expected in the next 50 years ir so. nt

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Tue Sep 15, 2020, 02:16 PM

2. I sure won't be leaving, and if trump happened to win a second term, California would be one of the

few tolerable places


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Response to still_one (Reply #2)

Tue Sep 15, 2020, 02:27 PM

5. Same here. Bobcat fire is burning 2 miles from my house, I've lived through riots and earthquakes,

and all kinds of other things, and I'm not going anywhere.
In Cali we figure stuff out, deal with it, and move forward!

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Response to BamaRefugee (Reply #5)

Tue Sep 15, 2020, 02:36 PM

6. It's just getting very exhausting

dealing with 2 or 3 large fires now every year. Horrible air quality from the smoke. I don't see it getting any better, only much worse.

I have lived here all of my life and I am thisclose to packing it in.

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Response to SoCalNative (Reply #6)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 05:59 PM

9. trust me, take an EXTENDED visit to where you think you might like first...The worst person I'll run

into on any given day in Cali will be a better person than 30% or more of people elsewhere, you have no idea of the hatred that burns throughout 'Murica.

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Response to BamaRefugee (Reply #9)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 06:11 PM

11. Who said anything about staying in 'Murica?

plenty of US territory islands to choose from, as well as Panama, Central America, etc.

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Response to SoCalNative (Reply #11)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 06:14 PM

12. Well, US Territory means you're still ruled by trump ;-)

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Response to BamaRefugee (Reply #12)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 06:19 PM

14. Actually, it really doesn't

They have their own government bodies, you don't pay US federal taxes and don't have to worry about voting in presidential elections or national for anything US.

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Response to BamaRefugee (Reply #5)

Tue Sep 15, 2020, 02:44 PM

7. I'm here in Altadena

My home smells like a campfire. I got the AC running. Keeping my fngers crossed about the direction of the fire and packed a few items if we gotta evac.

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Response to ariesgem (Reply #7)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 05:59 PM

10. I'm in Monrovia. Watching my mountain burn right outside my windows!

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Tue Sep 15, 2020, 02:20 PM

3. Ohio suits me just fine

A few 90 degrees days. We could use some rain but everything is still green. As one who considered other states to retire to, I am content.

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Tue Sep 15, 2020, 02:23 PM

4. Inland migration is real.

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Tue Sep 15, 2020, 03:07 PM

8. I have lived in Kansas my whole life and have never seen a tornado even though I wanted to.

When sirens go off about tornadoes, I am not even concerned, because lightning kills far more than tornadoes. Besides, I am old enough now and medically destroyed that I just don't give a damn anymore.

However, it did occur to me last night watching the West Coast fire coverage: With our nation's military, why didn't it ever occur to this nation's politicians to ever come up with a way to combat natural disasters with already existing military equipment to do a change over to fight fires and to dampen fire spots? I know, the first move would be to look at the flashing warning lights and act on climate change, but some stop gap measures could have happened to allow a fleet of aircraft to be hauling water to extinguish fires. Then again, maybe a way does exist, but Republicans refuse to every be reasonable about anything and prefer just destroying everything in sight.

What good are Republicans for again?
Funny how every problem ends up there.

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 06:16 PM

13. Fires are a recurrent California problem, but they're

also localized problems that impact very specific areas, usually low-density. Most of us live in cities where weíre safe, if a little smoky.

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 06:19 PM

15. I have no real complaints about New England.

Sure, we get hot, humid summers and snowy, cold winters but it really hasn't been that bad the last few years. Our short springs and slightly longer autumns are beautiful, and occasionally we will get a hurricane or a blizzard from hell, but I will take that over what the rest of the country has to put up with.

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Response to smirkymonkey (Reply #15)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 06:44 PM

17. As climate change gets worse, New England will start to see violent Northern

Atlantic hurricanes.

But you are right, it is beautiful most of the year and the Fall is to die for. I have business associates and a few friends there.

I need to brush up on my swim strokes. I have a feeling that Florida may be going back under water. Or maybe we will grow gills, never put anything past Florida Man and Florida Woman.

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Response to Blue_true (Reply #17)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 06:51 PM

18. I expect we will, but at least with hurricanes we get a warning and can evacuate

ahead of time. And I will. I am not one of those people who will stick it out because of pride. I was here during Hurricane Sandy and it was bad and very frightening even though we didn't get the worst of it, but I do not want to go through that again.

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Response to smirkymonkey (Reply #18)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 07:07 PM

19. Hurricanes scare me way more than tornados.

I have lived in KCMO for 50 years abd have never seen a tornado. I had one go over the top of my house one night.

No hurricanes. No fires. We do get some bad thunderstorms. Winters usually aren't too bad. We don't get a lot of snow.

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Response to Blue_true (Reply #17)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 07:48 PM

23. Not sure about hurricanes

Atmospheric circulation is driven by the difference in temperature between the equator and the arctic. However, the arctic is warming much faster than the equator, reducing the temperature differential. This should reduce atmospheric circulation.

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 06:24 PM

16. What will happen is that as climate change get worse, fires, tornadoes, hurricanes

will affect a larger and larger part of the country. Big hurricanes will be striking places like Boston and NYC, tornadoes and massive fires hitting places like Michigan and Minnesota.

We can expect to be able to run from climate change. We must mitigate it and then figure out a way to reverse it.

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Response to Blue_true (Reply #16)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 07:43 PM

20. where do you get the info that massive fires will hit Michigan?

https://projects.propublica.org/climate-migration/

Your comment:

"We must mitigate it and then figure out a way to reverse it."

Human nature being what it is, I wouldn't put much faith into that happening. I'm working on preparing for what the best science today predicts will happen in my area.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #20)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 08:06 PM

26. The whole world and the whole USA will get drier.

Dry land results in bad fires. Florida went through a fire crisis about 5 years ago. There were massive fires in Tennessee that killed a lot of people and caused billions in property damage at about the same time. It isnít a question of whether forest land in Michigan will eventually have devastating fires if we donít slow climate change, the only question is when. I honestly never thought that I would see fires sweep across Florida until I witnessed that about 5 years ago - we normally have a wet, humid climate, but dew on grass is becoming less regular, trees are drier and weeds turn into the Golden folder that gives fires easy fuel. Michigan and states in that region will eventually have that problem as climate change dries out their environs.

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Response to Blue_true (Reply #26)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 08:12 PM

27. Upper Michigan is expected to get wetter

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #27)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 08:17 PM

29. You live there it seems, so I will defer to you.

But like I said, I once viewed Florida as almost fire-proof.

Is there an ongoing study of the amount of water in Lake Superior and Lake Michigan year to year?

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 07:44 PM

21. Flooding at 10' sea level rise floods barrier islands and expands back bay marshes a couple miles

But generally doesn't change the coastline that much.

Except of course, Miami. But Miami was a marsh at sea level to begin with.

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 07:48 PM

22. I'm in CA

and staying put. Had previously thought about Oregon, but that's out now, because the areas I like are too fire prone. Where I am now is pretty safe, as it's deep in the suburbs and away from the coast and the mountains, i.e., in the north central valley.

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 07:54 PM

24. I live in California. If you live within in the cities, fires aren't much of a threat.

The fires are limited to wilderness areas and only impact those who live within or near those fire-prone areas.

Here in Los Angeles, the fires are in the mountains north of the city. Only a few blocks worth of houses in those foothills have been evacuated. The rest of the city has smoke, but our homes are not in danger.

I had some friends who lost houses in the Ventura fires a few years ago. Again, they were in the hills on the edge of a fire prone area. Very sad to see them lose their homes, but that was part of the risk of building there.

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 07:58 PM

25. it's not an issue in the areas most people live in.

The bigger concerns are environmental.

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Response to tblue37 (Original post)

Thu Sep 17, 2020, 08:13 PM

28. I was born here in California so were my parents and grandparents

I would leave here if I could but have too much family here and I'm not young enough to be uprooted. California is no longer a paradise, it's over developed, over populated with deteriorating infrastructure. I think the problems here will only get worse.

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