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Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:26 AM

What happened? Did judge receive the paperwork filed for Stone's commutation?


Iíve searched unsuccessfully for any updates on this story.

11 replies, 761 views

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Reply What happened? Did judge receive the paperwork filed for Stone's commutation? (Original post)
Ninga Jul 2020 OP
ariadne0614 Jul 2020 #1
Ninga Jul 2020 #2
soothsayer Jul 2020 #3
lapucelle Jul 2020 #5
lapucelle Jul 2020 #4
lapucelle Jul 2020 #6
Nevilledog Jul 2020 #9
lapucelle Jul 2020 #10
Nevilledog Jul 2020 #11
greenjar_01 Jul 2020 #7
Ninga Jul 2020 #8

Response to Ninga (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:29 AM

1. I heard the deadline is Thursday. n/t

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Response to ariadne0614 (Reply #1)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:30 AM

2. Thanks!

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Response to Ninga (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:31 AM

3. Well they posted it. Dunno what that actually means though


?s=21

JUST IN: The Office of the Pardon attorney has posted the clemency order that Trump signed for Roger STONE.

It voids all elements of his sentence, including a $20,000 fine and two years of supervised release.

https://justice.gov/pardon/page/file/1293796/download

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Response to soothsayer (Reply #3)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:40 AM

5. I think the judge had questions about whether the supervised release was included.

Trump's clemency for Roger Stone wipes away fine and supervised release.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trumpís executive clemency to his longtime friend and adviser Roger Stone not only commuted the veteran Republican operativeís prison term but it also spared him a hefty fine and two years of supervised release.

The details of the clemency arrangement were made public by the Justice Department and Stoneís lawyer on Monday after the judge who presided over the case asked the Trump administration to explain whether the commutation announced on Friday meant he would not be supervised, as many convicted felons are after being freed.

U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson had set a Tuesday deadline to receive a copy of Trumpís clemency order along with an explanation about whether it also commuted the period Stone was meant to be supervised after leaving prison.


https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-stone/judge-seeks-clarity-on-the-scope-of-trumps-clemency-order-for-roger-stone-idUSKCN24E261

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Response to Ninga (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:36 AM

4. The pardon document was publicly released yesterday.

Washington (CNN)The Justice Department on Monday released President Donald Trump's signed executive order wiping away the sentence of his longtime friend Roger Stone.

Trump not only spared Stone from serving 40 months in a federal prison camp, his order also releases Stone from house arrest, two years on probation and a $20,000 fine imposed by the court for his crimes, the order shows.

The two-page document was published on the Justice Department's website after Judge Amy Berman Jackson, who handed down Stone's sentence earlier this year, said she wanted to see the commutation paperwork. She noted Monday morning that the US Probation Office raised questions, and she asked whether Trump's order last week covered only Stone's prison time or also his probation.

Later Monday, the Justice Department and Stone's legal team sent the court documents showing his entire sentence had been commuted. The department noted in its submissions that Stone's multiple convictions "still stand."

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/13/politics/roger-stone-trump-commutation-documents/index.html

You can read the document here:

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/justice-department-releases-stone-clemency-grant-inquiry-judge/story?id=71755673

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Response to Ninga (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:47 AM

6. Barr is nothing if not experienced in this area.

William Barr Supported Pardons In An Earlier D.C. 'Witch Hunt': Iran-Contra

Barr, who is scheduled to go before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday for his confirmation hearings, ran the Justice Department once before, under President George H.W. Bush.

Back then, the all-consuming, years-long scandal was called Iran-Contra. On Dec. 24, 1992, it ended when Bush pardoned six people who had been caught up in it.

"The Constitution is quite clear on the powers of the president and sometimes the president has to make a very difficult call," Bush said then. "That's what I've done."

Then-Attorney General Barr supported the president's decision in the Iran-Contra case, which gave clemency to people who had been officials in the administration of President Ronald Reagan, including former Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger. He had been set to go on trial to face charges about lying to Congress.

snip===================================================================

Then-Attorney General Barr supported the president's decision in the Iran-Contra case, which gave clemency to people who had been officials in the administration of President Ronald Reagan, including former Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger. He had been set to go on trial to face charges about lying to Congress.

To the man who led the Iran-Contra investigation [Lawrence Walsh], however, the pardons represented a miscarriage of justice.

"It demonstrates that powerful people with powerful allies can commit serious crimes in high office, deliberately abusing the public trust without consequences," said Lawrence Walsh, the independent prosecutor in the case, at the time of the pardons
.

snip==================================================================

"The big ones ó obviously, the Iran-Contra ones ó I certainly did not oppose any of them," Barr said as part of the Presidential Oral History Program of the Miller Center at the University of Virginia.

"I favored the broadest pardon authority," Barr said. "There were some people just arguing just for Weinberger. I said, 'No ó in for a penny, in for a pound.' "


https://www.npr.org/2019/01/14/684553791/william-barr-supported-pardons-in-an-earlier-d-c-witch-hunt-iran-contra

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Response to lapucelle (Reply #6)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:57 AM

9. Interesting info on justice.gov about commutation

A commutation of sentence reduces a sentence, either totally or partially, that is then being served, but it does not change the fact of conviction, imply innocence, or remove civil disabilities that apply to the convicted person as a result of the criminal conviction. A commutation may include remission (release) of the financial obligations that are imposed as part of a sentence, such as payment of a fine or restitution. A remission applies only to the part of the financial obligation that has not already been paid. A commutation of sentence has no effect on a personís immigration status and will not prevent removal or deportation from the United States. To be eligible to apply for commutation of sentence, a person must have reported to prison to begin serving his sentence and may not be challenging his conviction in the courts.

https://www.justice.gov/pardon/frequently-asked-questions

In Stone's case he had not started his imprisonment and I believe, at the very least, there is a pending motion for new trial.

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Response to Nevilledog (Reply #9)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 09:08 AM

10. Barr knows exactly what he's doing.

Why the second-class treatment of a commutation instead of a pardon? Wasnít Stone important enough for a pardon?

But wait. Someone who gets a pardon can no longer invoke the Fifth Amendment as a justification for refusing to testify in court. If Stone were called in some other case, heíd be required to spill any beans he had. But if I understand the law correctly, a commutation is more limited. The conviction stands, and the possibility of putting yourself in further jeopardy remains. Thus your Fifth Amendment rights stand.

So if you wanted to help out a buddy, but you also wanted to make sure he couldnít be forced to provide dangerous testimony in the future, commutation sure seems like the best bet, doesnít it?


https://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2020/07/why-did-trump-commute-roger-stones-sentence-instead-of-pardoning-him/

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Response to lapucelle (Reply #10)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 09:10 AM

11. That's obviously the reason why Stone wanted commutation vs. Pardon

I'm interested in the pending litigating on the conviction.

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Response to Ninga (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:49 AM

7. The clemency document was released yesterday

It clears Stone's prison sentence, as well as his 24 months of supervised release, and his $20,000 fine.

Stone is free and clear as of July 10, 2020.

A complete and total disgrace.

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Response to Ninga (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2020, 08:52 AM

8. I appreciate all the responses. Nt

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