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Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:04 AM

How to nurse yourself through pneumonia at home

I'm not a medical professional and qualifying this up-front by saying if you have symptoms of pneumonia you should try to get to see your doctor. But there's an increasing risk that a lot of people are not going to be able to get in to see a doctor or are going to have symptoms just short of needing to be hospitalised and will need to take care of themselves at home. For many cases of pneumonia you will be told to go home, rest and stay hydrated.

I did this last year for about a month and thought it might be helpful to talk about what I did (or wish I had done) and the kinds of easy things I think people could be doing to prepare for that potential situation. Happy for anyone else who has had the experience or who is a medical professional to weigh in.

1. What does it feel like?

You will be as tired as you have ever felt. All the time. You will get winded walking ten steps from the sofa to the fridge and will need to sit or lie down. You will be too tired to change clothes without falling over. You will hold off using the bathroom until the last possible second because walking to the toilet feels like too much effort. If you are reading or watching something funny you will have to stop because every time you laugh it turns into gasping for breath. But most of the time you will be too tired to read or watch TV anyway.

2. What will you not be doing for those three or four weeks?

In addition to the obvious stuff, you will not be doing laundry, washing dishes, cleaning anything, cooking anything that requires sustained standing up for more than 30 seconds, going out of your house, coming up with innovative alternatives to normal supplies you ran out of, passing the time constructively by reading Hegel or learning a new musical instrument.

3. What can you do while you're still well to help prepare?

- Clean and organise everything while you are well. You want to start from a pretty good point because it's all downhill as soon as you start getting really sick. Living in squalor and not being able to find anything just makes you feel worse.
- Wash all your bedding.
- Make real chicken stock and beef broth and freeze it.
- Buy enough toilet paper to last you a month. Don't let the haters shame you. You are not going to be screwing around with bidets (if you aren't used to them) or anything that has to be cleaned when you have pneumonia.
- Buy biodegradable disposable plates, cups, bowls, cutlery.
- Buy healthy food that is easy to prepare when you are sick. Hot brothy stuff will hit the spot. I lived off of raisin bran, frozen dumplings, canned mandarin oranges, chicken broth, tea and honey, tomato soup and grilled cheese sandwiches for three weeks.
- Make menu plans for three or four weeks that revolve around shelf-stable or freezable ingredients that you can batch cook and reheat as leftovers. Have as much as possible in the house so you don't have to go to the store or even get up meet the delivery person and then unpack all the groceries. A freezer full of chili con carne is a God-send if you like it. Don't include foods you don't really like because you feel like that's what you should be eating. Think about the stuff you crave when you're sick and go with it (or at least the version you can cram some fruits and veggies into.)
- Get a small trash can with a foot pedal and a lid. Get some bags to line it. Put it next to the sofa or chair where you plan to spend your days. You will be coughing up more crud than you would ever imagine possible and you will be too tired to get up to throw the tissue away.
- If you have pets, make plans to have someone else take care of them. You will not be walking the dog or emptying the litter tray.
- Put as many bills as you can on auto-pay if you haven't already or set alarms on you computer or phone to remind you to pay them. You're not going to know what day it is for a while.
- Stock up on your usual flu remedies and anything else that makes you feel comfortable, like chocolate. You need to be saving your whole week's worth of reserve energy to take the trash out, not trying to figure out how much dish soap to use in the dishwasher if you're used to using powder but ran out or improvising tooth paste from baking powder. If having paper towels means the difference to you between wiping up a spill right away and letting it fester for three weeks, buy extra paper towels. Seriously. Treat yourself.
- Load up your tablet, laptop, Netflix queue (whatever you have) with time-sucking mindless entertainment. Anything that will kill the hours while making zero demands on you. I suggest Candy-crush types apps.
- Have lots of warm fuzzy socks and several blankets in each room you plan to spend time so you don't have to carry them around.
- Build up your immune system now. Eat a healthy diet, get lots of sleep and do light exercise.

4. What can you do while you're sick?

- Don't lie in bed all day even though you want to. It's harder to sleep at night if you lay in bed all day and you need all the sleep you can get. Also your system needs to drain and you don't want to get bed sores. Find a day-time place where you can prop yourself up at a 45 degree angle and spend as much of the day there as you can. Put everything that you need within easy reach of that place.
- If you can't sleep at night, try propping yourself up with some extra pillows. Time your medications so they are at peak effectiveness at bedtime. See if sleeping on the sofa is more comfortable. Try chamomile tea. The most important thing you can do is get as much natural sleep as possible.
- Drink lots of hot liquids. Hold them under your nose so you get the benefit of the steam as well. Peppermint tea is a winner because there's no caffeine and drinking it every hour or two won't make you buzzy. See if you can find LemSip. It's magic.
- If it's at all possible, try to spend at least a little part of the day sitting in the sunlight where there is fresh air. Maybe you have a patio or balcony or can set up a chair near a sunny window. It makes the world of difference even if its just five minutes.
- Any tiny little sliver of energy that you may have left should go towards taking out the trash and cleaning up/clearing away obvious sources of bacteria or mold or mildew in your kitchen or bathroom. You're already fighting off one bug. Don't expose your system to more. Your lungs will also be aggravated by ammonia smells and mold or mildew growing on food you haven't thrown away.
- The steam from hot baths and showers will help clear out your lungs if you can get in or out safely and/or stand up long enough.
- Keep calling your doctor if you are having significant problems breathing or have a very high fever

Anything else? Sorry if this is all obvious, but trying to think of things that people might not have considered if they've never had to deal with a really serious respiratory problem at home and on their own before. Better to do something constructive with all that worry instead of watching the same thing on the news over and over for hours.

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Arrow 38 replies Author Time Post
Reply How to nurse yourself through pneumonia at home (Original post)
meadowlander Mar 2020 OP
Lars39 Mar 2020 #1
Wounded Bear Mar 2020 #2
Mike 03 Mar 2020 #3
OhioChick Mar 2020 #7
tavernier Mar 2020 #18
Mike 03 Mar 2020 #24
Mike 03 Mar 2020 #23
meadowlander Mar 2020 #12
Mike 03 Mar 2020 #25
OhioChick Mar 2020 #26
pazzyanne Mar 2020 #4
safeinOhio Mar 2020 #5
BigmanPigman Mar 2020 #6
Niagara Mar 2020 #33
BigmanPigman Mar 2020 #36
livetohike Mar 2020 #8
Scarsdale Mar 2020 #9
alittlelark Mar 2020 #10
Aquaria Mar 2020 #22
justhanginon Mar 2020 #11
Jillgirl Mar 2020 #13
Champp Mar 2020 #14
Shell_Seas Mar 2020 #15
Aquaria Mar 2020 #16
DeminPennswoods Mar 2020 #19
meadowlander Mar 2020 #20
bucolic_frolic Mar 2020 #17
littlemissmartypants Mar 2020 #21
yonder Mar 2020 #27
Alliepoo Mar 2020 #28
dalton99a Mar 2020 #29
Delphinus Mar 2020 #30
FM123 Mar 2020 #31
Mike 03 Mar 2020 #32
Niagara Mar 2020 #34
meadowlander Mar 2020 #35
LAS14 Mar 2020 #37
smirkymonkey Mar 2020 #38

Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:17 AM

1. Excellent op, meadowlander!

Set up telemed now with your clinic or doctor, before you get sick.
Also, Iíve found that a really long charging cord or battery banks are helpful when sick.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:21 AM

2. K & R...for visibility...nt

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:37 AM

3. This is excellent.

Some questions:

Does a person have a fever during the pneumonia phase of this virus?

If you don't feel like eating, should you not eat or should you force yourself to eat?

Hypothetically, before you get pneumonia, is there anything you can do with your lungs to try to prevent the virus from becoming pneumonia, like breathing a lot to keep your airways dry, or use something like a humidifier to keep them moist? Or in general is there anything one can do to make the lungs less vulnerable to pneumonia?

Thanks again. I'll print your post out!

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Response to Mike 03 (Reply #3)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:50 AM

7. While I can't answer all of your questions

I can say that prior to getting ill, your best bet would be to buy a spirometer to "open" up your lungs and increase your lung capacity.

It's not going to help after you're ill.

It may/may not help but a pulmonologist told me this.

They're cheap on Amazon.

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Response to OhioChick (Reply #7)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 06:39 AM

18. Yes!!

As a nurse (who has also had pneumonia in the past), I was just about to post this as well. And it does help throughout the disease process as well.

If you havenít ordered one yet, do some deep inhalation exercises whenever you think of it. But a spirometer will help you do them correctly.

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Response to tavernier (Reply #18)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 07:39 AM

24. Thank you so much!!

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Response to OhioChick (Reply #7)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 07:39 AM

23. Thank you. I'm going to try to find one of these!

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Response to Mike 03 (Reply #3)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 05:10 AM

12. Maybe a doctor can answer

but I think fever is a primary symptom of pneumonia. I didn't have Covid-19 but I did have a fever.

I think you do want to try to get a reasonable amount of calories in if you can. All I remember was I was starving on a few days. Maybe try to eat/drink something light like soup? Or get calories from fruit juices. Or eat something bland like saltines. I just tried to stick to my normal routine in terms of meal and bed-times as much as possible.

Not sure, again, how it works with Covid-19 but I would recommend taking it easy for longer than you think you need to when you're recovering from the initial infection. I started off with a mild cold for about four days, was on the mend, but then had to get on a 26 hour flight which I couldn't cancel. I can't sleep on planes, so I didn't get a proper night's sleep for a few days. Two days after the flight I got bronchitis which turned into pneumonia. If I hadn't gotten on the plane, I might have just recovered from the first infection. So maybe don't rush back to work or into your normal life if you've been down with Covid-19 but starting to feel better.

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Response to meadowlander (Reply #12)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 07:40 AM

25. Thank you very much, your help is appreciated.

This thread will be worth printing out for all the tips and info.

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Response to Mike 03 (Reply #25)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 08:05 AM

26. No problem

I checked Amazon and most of theirs aren't shipping until sometime in April.

I checked eBay and you could probably get it sooner there. (Make sure it's a US seller if you're in the US, it'll get to you quicker)

Any one of these types would work sufficiently: (I have no affiliation with these sellers, only giving you an idea of what to look for)

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Teleflex-Hudson-RCI-Voldyne-5000-Incentive-Spirometer-8884719009-NEW-SEALED/272144412195?hash=item3f5d122e23:g:U-AAAOSwx-9Wzd-C

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Teleflex-Hudson-RCI-Voldyne-2500-Incentive-Spirometer-8884719025-NEW-SEALED/272335147019?hash=item3f6870900b:g:MmQAAOSwaB5XqTb9

I have one like this, as I've been prone to and have gotten pneumonia quite a bit since I was a child.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:39 AM

4. K&R

Great advice. Bookmarking.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:42 AM

5. Going old school prep.

Vicks Vapor Rub
Aspirin
Nettie Pot
Heating pad
vit. C and D
Two ankle biters and a cat to cuddle
GF nurse.


I'm ready, or so I hope.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:45 AM

6. Make sure you have a sympathetic family.

I got it in college and lived at home that year. My mom thought I was lying so I wouldn't have to work at my new Summer job. She made me walk to the nearest hospital. Each crack in the sidewalk was an individual goal..."If I can just make it to the next crack, etc.".

Than when I was coughing all night my sister made me sleep on the floor in the den since I was keeping her up (I had a bedroom loft).

One good thing came out of it. A few days earlier I got a haircut from the Barber who cut James Dean's hair so I thought that was a good thing. It wasn't. I wanted my Edie cut trimmed but he gave me Mamie Eisenhower bangs. They were so short they stuck straight out like a visor on a hat. I was so glad that I could stay inside for 4 weeks and my bangs would grow out a little. Silver Lining!

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Response to BigmanPigman (Reply #6)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 10:37 AM

33. That's terrible that your mom didn't believe you.

I'm so sorry.

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Response to Niagara (Reply #33)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 03:44 PM

36. I gave her a big, fat, "I TOLD YOU SO!".

She had it coming. The doctor said I had pneumonia just by listening to my chest. He said my lungs sounded like "Rice Crispies".

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:52 AM

8. Thank you! Great advice I had pneumonia in 1984

when I was just 32. I only remember the extreme fatigue and every motion was tiring.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 04:58 AM

9. Great advice.

Thank you. I have had pneumonia several times, before I finally quit smoking. One time I went to work and my boss sent me home, he said "You face is GREEN" It is everything you describe.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 05:03 AM

10. Thank You for posting this !! I got the 2009 Swine Flu

And double lung pneumonia - brutal.

Your advice is spot-on.

One thing that I would add - pain. Double lung pneumonia is pain. Every part of the body hurts. Every bone hurts. Over the counter meds do little or nothing. The fog of pain pours over every breath and movement.

My ex FIL was a pill junkie and gave me 40 vicodin which I used over the month I was in bed. I will always be grateful for that. He was a real dick - 6 divorces, an insulting asshole, but I will always be grateful for those 40 vicodin.

I would suggest finding pain meds. Your Dr will likely not prescribe them because u might become addicted.................................

If there is any time for pain meds it is double lung pneumonia.

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Response to alittlelark (Reply #10)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 07:21 AM

22. OMG This

 

I'd had pneumonia by itself before, but what came with swine flu was unfrickingbelievable.

By the way: It's not addiction alone that makes it tough to get pain meds with pneumonia outside of a hospital setting. The other reason is that nearly all of the effective pain medications and sedatives like opioids are contraindicated for anyone experiencing breathing problems. You have to be carefully monitored, or you could stop breathing for good, and that will totally suck. Hence why pneumonia patients will only get pain meds if they're in the hospital.

When my swine flu took on pneumonia, my husband called my mom the RN, who somehow rustled up a few dozen Percocet (!). Because she was caring for my stepfather who was an invalid by then and couldn't come take care of me herself like she wanted, a friend of ours met up with her to pick it up, and brought it back with explicit instructions from my mother for when to give it to me: Only when my husband could be there to watch over me, and not to leave my side for longer than necessary. She did pitch a fit that I should be in the hospital, but my husband couldn't drive and the drug mule friend couldn't be anywhere near me because he was hyper-immunosuppressed (he brought the meds to my husband's workplace). That left relying on an ambulance to get me to the hospital, and I didn't want to go that route. I decided to take my chances with riding it out.

That was probably really stupid of me. It's a wonder I didn't die, but I thought I'd be better "in a few days." It wound up taking a lot of those "few days" to get there.

Anyway, I was so damned glad to have that Percocet. I thought I was going to lose my mind if I didn't get some relief from the agony. I couldn't even sleep longer than 5-10 minute patches because I was in so much pain.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 05:04 AM

11. Great post. I just finished two weeks in the hospital with pneumonia

and your post is so very accurate. Thought I was not going to make it. I stayed with my daughter for a week after release and am now at home. It is a bit of a struggle but everything in slow motion helps with the breathing. Going to be a long time to fully recover.
Incidentally, I had all my shots for flu and pneumonia but still got it. I guess it was a different strain.
Again, your post is spot on.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 05:21 AM

13. Great resource.

No, it's not obvious. Or maybe it is, but only once you say it. And it's important. Thanks for posting.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 05:27 AM

14. Thanks

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 05:55 AM

15. I wish I could rest

I have pneumonia right now. And I also have 3 little ones home and my husband is still going to work. Not complaining, but not everyone can have the luxury of living a zero demand life, even with pneumonia

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 06:19 AM

16. Cool air humidifier

 

Make sure it's by where you will be, sleeping or awake, and the stream pointed to come right at you. It will really help.

I can vouch for sitting up. Anytime I laid down, I felt like I was suffocating. So I spent most of my illness sitting up. With the right arrangement of pillows, I was even able to rest on my side sitting up. I was also lucky that I have skylights in my living room. I'd go out there when I couldn't stand looking at my bedroom walls anymore, so I got plenty of natural light.

I liked having a cool room, in the mid 60s, but with plenty of blankets to keep me warm. I seemed to breathe better with the air at that temperature than at 70 or above. But other people may feel differently about it.

Fewer lung irritants = Good. So if you don't have a good HEPA air filter, get one. For people with carpets or rugs: Whatever room you're in, have someone dust and vacuum your other hangout spot every day, if possible. And then when you go to the living room or wherever for the change of pace, dust and vacuum the other room. No perfumes or air fresheners or any of that. My husband used Lysol spray to disinfect bedding or the sofa right after I left a room. By the time I was ready to go back, the smell would be gone. Then he could spray down where I'd left.

It goes without saying to avoid all smoke, whether it's lighting up your fireplace, your husband running the grill on the patio, burnt food or typical tobacco or weed smoke. Smoke of any kind will make everything worse. My husband had to ask the neighbors not to barbecue until I was better, and a friend who was crashing at our place at the time had to stop eating toast, because he likes it just this side of burnt. It took only one episode of each for me to be hacking worse than I already was.

And no cough medicine, unless your doctor advises it. Coughing gets the crap out of your lungs, which is what you need when you have pneumonia. My doctor prescribed some prescription cough suppressant, eventually, but only because I reached a point where I had coughed so hard, so long, that my ribs hurt too bad and I wasn't able to cough anymore. That was a no-win situation. A few days of rest for my ribs, and I was able to go back to hacking up my lungs.

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Response to Aquaria (Reply #16)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 06:48 AM

19. Heard the same advice about sleeping better

in cool temps from an RN who specializes in geriatric care.

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Response to Aquaria (Reply #16)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 06:56 AM

20. Yes! My Roomba is a life saver.

I know not everyone can afford one but if you can it makes a huge difference not to have to vacuum yourself.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 06:31 AM

17. Gold standard post, thanks! /nt

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 07:01 AM

21. Thank you, meadowlander. Bookmarking. ❤ nt

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 09:43 AM

27. Thanks for this.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 09:51 AM

28. Great advice!

Thanks for posting and Thanks to all who replied! Bookmarking for future reference. Hope no one in my household will need it but because my sons employers are money grubbing jerks, heís still having to go to work and be face to face and in close quarters (elevator) w the public. (Heís been staying with us to save $ to buy a house-he also has a 6 yr old little girl) Heís in property management-canít have the richy folks not be able to see models of luxury apartments now, can we? Never mind that all other similar businesses in their area are working from home and sending video tours to prospective clients. Big boss was in a few days ago telling them itís business as usual. Iím guessing big boss isnít letting the public into her office. Sorry for the rant. Again, thanks for the info.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 09:53 AM

29. Kick

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 09:56 AM

30. Thank you

I am going to save this information.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 10:08 AM

31. Thank you for sharing!

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 10:26 AM

32. Kick for importance

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 10:37 AM

34. Bookmarked.

Thank you.


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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Fri Mar 20, 2020, 03:22 PM

35. Trying to think if there is anything else...

You lose at least 40 IQ points when you have pneumonia. You are more likely to make stupid mistakes and injure yourself. Try to "baby-proof" your house against yourself.

Things like looking at a pantry full of soup with all the labels turned away from you and searching through for the kind you want is going to feel too hard. Get everything you need organised so you can find it at a glance so you're not wasting energy rummaging through your bathroom cabinets trying to find throat lozenges.

Get cords tucked away anywhere you might trip on them and clear stuff off the floor anywhere you're going to be lurching around so you don't stub your toes. Put your oven mitts in an obvious place so you don't forget and burn yourself. Don't have big piles of things that are going to fall over on you if you try to pull something else out and knock them over.

Bonus shopping tips before you get sick:
Plan all your meals at least a week to a month or two in advance and order the groceries delivered. Even if they're booked out for five days at least you know when you will get the food. And the advance order lets the store plan ahead so you're less likely not to get what you want.
Alternately, most shops stock up overnight so your best bet is to get there first thing. 9am is too late. Every second that you waste in line in a grocery store are calories you're going to wish you still had when you're sick.
If you google the name of the store you're wanting to go to, it shows you what the normal peak hours are and how crowded it is now (based on mobile phone data). Go during the least crowded hours.
Think outside the big box. Ethnic grocery stores or bulk food stores might have what you want in stock.
Be prepared to be flexible and substitute items or go a little exotic. If you can't get kidney beans, cranberry beans work fine in all the same things. Try pappadoms if you can't find crackers. They're lovely. If you can't get your comfort foods, think of it as a chance to find some new ones.

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Thu Mar 26, 2020, 11:26 AM

37. Thanks! Just what I've been looking for! We want to stay out of the hospital if at all possible. nt

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Response to meadowlander (Original post)

Thu Mar 26, 2020, 07:18 PM

38. Very helpful!

Thank you!

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