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Sat Mar 7, 2020, 11:42 AM

Dog or cat petting and virus transmission?

Not trying to alarm anyone but, since I volunteer for a pet therapy group, I am wondering if dog/cat petting can be a means of transmission of the flu or corona virus. We are admonished not to shake hands but what about petting a dog or cat that has just been petted my others?

I have googled the matter but can find nothing definite. Anyone have a source of info?

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Response to Disaffected (Original post)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 11:45 AM

1. I think, like with anything you touch during this, wash your hands as soon as you can.

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Reply #1)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 11:47 AM

2. Agree

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Reply #1)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 12:02 PM

7. Yes, hand washing is important

And, I'm not referring in my query to transmission of virus from an infected dog to humans rather the transmission of virus that may be on a pet's fur, placed there by someone infected who just petted it, to someone else who petted it afterwards (very similar to shaking hands with someone or touching any other contaminated object).

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Response to Disaffected (Original post)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 11:47 AM

3. ..well one dog did test mildly positive..

..IMHO dogs are cleaner than we mere mortals...

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Response to Disaffected (Original post)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 11:48 AM

4. Pleaste stay calm. The only case yet reported is a Hong Kong case wherein a infected human

transferred virus to a pet dog who remained free of symptoms (as we expect), yet tested positive. Remember a positive test does NOT always mean LIVE INFECTIVE virus, but the test shows evidence of nucleic acids specific to the virus. There is no evidence thus far that dogs become sick from it and nor is there evidence they can transmit it to humans. Can humans transfer MECHANICALLY the virus to dogs? Apparently. But to date, they have not been shown to get sick nor transfer it.

One should be cautious nonetheless of not transferring this or other infections to pets. Wash your hands before and after handling them and let a healthy family member take care of the pet if you are sick.

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #4)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 12:00 PM

6. Here's the link for that story from 3/5/2020


https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/a-dog-has-a-low-level-coronavirus-infection-in-first-known-human-to-animal-transmission/

Also noted by a CBS story on 3/4/2020 and the International Business Times 3/5/2020, et al (lots of published info per query re human to dog transmissions per DuckDuckGo

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Response to Disaffected (Original post)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 11:59 AM

5. I have no doubt that my greatest exposure is through my pets, because my

hubby and I allow them to sit on our laps when we're watching t.v. And we do a great deal of petting. If my hubby gets the coronavirus, this is the way we'll probably pass it on to each other since we're aware of the other avenues of exchange.

I wonder if there is a pet wipe that we can use to reduce the virus? Maybe baby wipes?

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #5)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 12:08 PM

8. Yes, wipes might be a good idea.

Avoiding off-leash parks might also be advisable.

I would also like to know how long the virus would remain viable after being deposited (by petting) on a pet's fur.

All this is of concern to me as I am scheduled to visit a local hospital on Tuesday for a pet therapy session and I certainly don't wish for our pets to be a potential virus transmission vector. I think I will talk to the hospital volunteer coordinator to see if she has any info...

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Response to Disaffected (Reply #8)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 12:18 PM

10. Don't assume sanitizing wipes designed for humans are nontoxic for dogs. See below

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #10)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 12:29 PM

12. Thanks

Good point on toxicity.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #5)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 12:17 PM

9. Don't assume human products are safe for dogs or cats who will like them off! Many are NOT

You'd be far more wise to wash your own hands before and after and use wipes on your hands and ensure you don't handle them if YOU are sick. Remember that what you apply to your dog will be licked by your dog and much is toxic--bleach especially, but likewise some of the components of sanitizing wipes. Soap and water and wipes designed for dogs are fine, but focus on your own hands.

Dogs have not been shown to become ill from nor at this time transmit this virus. That is what you need to remember. Could someone be infected from immediately touching hair on a dog who had just been sneezed on by YOU? Yes, likely. But that is why you should focus on preventing your contamination of the dog while not harming him with human products.

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #9)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 01:08 PM

13. Good advice. Thank you.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #5)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 01:57 PM

14. Of course washing hands after petting animals and between animals is the best.

The second is bathing your pet but bathing them enough to be realistic with helping to keep the contaminates down is unrealistic for several reasons.

They do have wipes for both cats and dogs and they are a little like a mini bath but should not be relied on for such. I do think they would be a bit helpful though.

If you are determined to do steps to try and protect yourself and pets brush them often ( idealisticly every day ), use wipes only for pets particularly on paws after walks in public area's, sanitize the grooming tools between each grooming, bath every 4 to 8 weeks, avoid dog parks, do not allow other animals into your home, and keep pet bedding clean.

From 11 years of dog grooming and 4 year working in animal shelters that is my advise.

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Response to Disaffected (Original post)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 12:24 PM

11. Like many other aspects of this disease, there is no science yet on that issue.

Most everything that's being passed around on coronavirus is speculation and "best guess" info, even from professionals. We must remember this is a brand-new virus that has no history in science.

We must be patient until scientific testing can provide conclusive proof whether the disease can be spread from people or animals that harbor virus cells, including children and pets. Medical professions at this time are not even certain of all the ways it can be transmitted. I'm seeing a lot of false info floating around that has no medical science basis.

Because most medical scientific facilities are occupied simply trying to track the genome and identify ways to control the spread, conclusions on things like spread from animals or other "passive" carriers will take some time.

Until conclusive proof comes along, one would be wise to avoid exposure to any human or animal that has had exposure to an infected human, along with any surfaces they may have contacted.

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Response to Disaffected (Original post)

Sat Mar 7, 2020, 03:04 PM

15. Maybe this article will help a little...

The press seems to have latched on to this subject without doing any validation from medical/veterinary experts. Pox on the press for heightening the hysteria element when we're trying to remain calm and resourceful. See below link:

https://mynorthwest.com/1744610/coronavirus-pets-veterinarian/

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