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Fri Oct 18, 2019, 04:26 PM

The late Rep. Elijah Cummings will lie in state in National Statuary Hall



Geoff Bennett ✔ @GeoffRBennett

Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces that the late Rep. Elijah Cummings will lie in state in National Statuary Hall in the Capitol on Thursday, October 24.


5:22 PM - Oct 18, 2019


5 replies, 630 views

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Reply The late Rep. Elijah Cummings will lie in state in National Statuary Hall (Original post)
Dennis Donovan Oct 2019 OP
babylonsister Oct 2019 #1
Dennis Donovan Oct 2019 #2
Ms. Toad Oct 2019 #4
mcar Oct 2019 #3
2naSalit Oct 2019 #5

Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 04:43 PM

1. National Statuary Hall



National Statuary Hall

Description
National Statuary Hall is a chamber in the United States Capitol devoted to sculptures of prominent Americans. The hall, also known as the Old Hall of the House, is a large, two-story, semicircular room with a second story gallery along the curved perimeter. It is located immediately south of the Rotunda. Wikipedia

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Response to babylonsister (Reply #1)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 04:49 PM

2. John Quincy Adams suffered a cerebral hemorrhage while a congressman - died 2 days later

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Quincy_Adams#Death

Death
John Quincy Adams's original tomb at Hancock Cemetery, across the street from United First Parish Church
In 1846, the 78-year-old former president suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed. After a few months of rest, he made a full recovery and resumed his duties in Congress. When Adams entered the House chamber, everyone "stood up and applauded."

On February 21, 1848, the House of Representatives was discussing the matter of honoring U.S. Army officers who served in the Mexican–American War. Adams had been a vehement critic of the war, and as Congressmen rose up to say, "Aye!" in favor of the measure, he instead yelled, "No!" He rose to answer a question put forth by Speaker of the House Robert Charles Winthrop. Immediately thereafter, Adams collapsed, having suffered a massive cerebral hemorrhage. Two days later, on February 23, he died at 7:20 p.m. with his wife at his side in the Speaker's Room inside the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.; his only living child, Charles Francis, did not arrive in time to see his father alive. His last words were "This is the last of earth. I am content."

His original interment was temporary, in the public vault at the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Later, he was interred in the family burial ground in Quincy, Massachusetts, across from the First Parish Church, called Hancock Cemetery. After Louisa's death in 1852, his son had his parents reinterred in the expanded family crypt in the United First Parish Church across the street, next to John and Abigail. Both tombs are viewable by the public. Adams's original tomb at Hancock Cemetery is still there and marked simply "J.Q. Adams".

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Reply #2)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 05:30 PM

4. For anyone else who is confused by this reference

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 05:04 PM

3. Quite appropriate

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 05:48 PM

5. I approve!

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