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Mon Sep 2, 2019, 10:20 AM

74 Years Ago Today; Surrender in Tokyo Bay

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Instrument_of_Surrender


Representatives of the Empire of Japan stand aboard USS Missouri prior to signing of the Instrument of Surrender

The Japanese Instrument of Surrender was the written agreement that formalized the surrender of the Empire of Japan, marking the end of hostilities in World War II. It was signed by representatives from the Empire of Japan, the United States of America, the Republic of China, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the Commonwealth of Australia, the Dominion of Canada, the Provisional Government of the French Republic, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, and the Dominion of New Zealand. The signing took place on the deck of USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945.

The date is sometimes known as Victory over Japan Day, although that designation more frequently refers to the date of Emperor Hirohito's Gyokuon-hōsō (Imperial Rescript of Surrender), the radio broadcast announcement of the acceptance of the terms of the Potsdam Declaration at noon Japan Standard Time on August 15.

Surrender ceremony


Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu signing the Instrument of Surrender on behalf of the Japanese Government, formally ending World War II


General of the Army Douglas MacArthur signing the Instrument of Surrender on behalf of the Allied Powers

The ceremony aboard the deck of the Missouri lasted 23 minutes and was broadcast throughout the world. The instrument was first signed by the Japanese foreign minister Mamoru Shigemitsu "By Command and on behalf of the Emperor of Japan and the Japanese Government" (9:04 am). General Yoshijirō Umezu, Chief of the Army General Staff, then signed the document "By Command and on behalf of the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters" (9:06 am). The Japanese representatives present for the signing were the following:

Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu
General Yoshijirō Umezu, Chief of the Army General Staff
Major General Yatsuji Nagai
Katsuo Okazaki (Foreign Ministry)
Rear Admiral Tadatoshi Tomioka
Toshikazu Kase (Foreign Ministry)
Lt. General Suichi Miyakazi
Rear Admiral Ichiro Yokoyama
Saburo Ota (Foreign Ministry)
Captain Katsuo Shiba (Navy)
Colonel Kaziyi Sugita


At 9:08 a.m., U.S. General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, the Commander in the Southwest Pacific and Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, accepted the surrender on behalf of the Allied Powers and signed in his capacity as Supreme Commander.

After MacArthur's signature as Supreme Commander, the following representatives signed the instrument of surrender on behalf of each of the Allied Powers:

Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz for the United States (9:12 a.m.)
General Hsu Yung-chang for China (9:13 a.m.)
Admiral Sir Bruce Fraser for the United Kingdom (9:14 a.m.)
Lieutenant General Kuzma Derevyanko for the Soviet Union (9:16 a.m.)
General Sir Thomas Blamey for Australia (9:17 a.m.)
Colonel Lawrence Moore Cosgrave for Canada (9:18 a.m.)
Général de Corps d'Armée Philippe Leclerc de Hauteclocque for France (9:20 a.m.)
Lieutenant Admiral C. E. L. Helfrich for the Netherlands (9:21 a.m.)
Air Vice-Marshal Leonard M. Isitt for New Zealand (9:22 a.m.)


The UK invited Dominion governments to send representatives to the ceremony as subordinates to its own. MacArthur supported the government of Australia's demand to attend and sign separately from the UK, although Australia objected to his recommendation that Canada, the Netherlands, and France also sign the document.

On September 6, Colonel Bernard Theilen took the document and an imperial rescript to Washington, D.C., and presented them to President Harry S. Truman in a formal White House ceremony the following day. The documents were then exhibited at the National Archives.

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Plaque in the deck of the Missouri marking the location of the signing

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Mon Sep 2, 2019, 10:30 AM

1. I was witness to a reenactment of this ceremony on the decks of the battleship USS Missouri

I was an extra in the movie MacArthur and had a bird's eye view of the production.

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Mon Sep 2, 2019, 10:32 AM

2. You can actually tour the USS Mossouri in Pearl Harbor

My wife and I did a few years ago...really incredible to see where such an important event in history took place.

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Response to mpreorder (Reply #2)

Tue Sep 3, 2019, 03:18 PM

7. I toured the Missouri when it was still anchored at Bremerton in Puget Sound, Washington.

I got to see the plaque marking the location of the surrender table.

I hope to see it again someday...

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Mon Sep 2, 2019, 10:54 AM

3. Here's a fabulous restored version of George Kosco's film of this event





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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Mon Sep 2, 2019, 10:57 AM

4. It was an unbelievably small space on the ship where the surrender took place....

all those people to the right were on scaffolds over the side of the ship.

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Response to Historic NY (Reply #4)

Tue Sep 3, 2019, 03:09 PM

6. Crazy to think we have cruise ships now that are 5x the Missouri's size

USS Missouri: 57k tons
Symphony of the Seas: 258k tons

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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Sep 3, 2019, 02:18 PM

5. I was certain you would have started a thread about this. Thanks.

Americans straining to see Japanese World War II surrender, Tokyo Bay, USS Missouri, today 1945: #NARA



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Ship opposite is USS Proteus. On board are future actors Bernard Schwartz (Tony Curtis) and Larry Storch.




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Response to Dennis Donovan (Original post)

Tue Sep 3, 2019, 03:21 PM

8. Really interesting. Thanks for posting

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