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Wed Aug 14, 2019, 07:25 PM

Where can I find out what a building was when the building is no longer there?

I remember a building not far from my home town when I was a kid. It was outside of any city limits. I would like to know what kind of building it was. I think it burned sometimes a few decades ago. I think it was a store. If so, what was the name of the store what kind of store etc. where could I find this out?

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Reply Where can I find out what a building was when the building is no longer there? (Original post)
raccoon Aug 14 OP
hlthe2b Aug 14 #1
Raven Aug 14 #2
The Velveteen Ocelot Aug 14 #3
Sherman A1 Aug 14 #5
SeattleVet Aug 14 #4
tblue37 Aug 14 #6

Response to raccoon (Original post)

Wed Aug 14, 2019, 07:30 PM

1. Tax accessor's office for the city? (if you have the address or approximate)

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Wed Aug 14, 2019, 07:30 PM

2. Go to the town office and see if you can

locate the building on the tax map. If you can, get to tax parcel number and ask the town for the file on the property. Most towns keep a file on each property in town which should have building permits and tax cards going way back. That should give you the history of the property. Good luck!

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Wed Aug 14, 2019, 07:30 PM

3. Try the county courthouse register of deeds office.

There should be a record of the property owner and maybe the name of the business. If there is a county historical society you could try there as well.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Wed Aug 14, 2019, 07:34 PM

5. Yes,

Check on the possibility of a Historical society or group of some sort. I work with one locally and they have done great work in both archiving and restoration.

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Wed Aug 14, 2019, 07:30 PM

4. Local jurisdiction's real estate tax records would be a good starting point.

Many places used to photograph every address as they build their tax rolls. They will usually be filed by the plat number of the property.

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Wed Aug 14, 2019, 07:39 PM

6. OT, but the rhythm of your thread title scans like "How much wood would a woodchuck chuck

if a woodchuck could chuck wood?"

Sorry--it just struck me as funny when I read it.

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