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Sun Jul 21, 2019, 12:21 PM

Almost 1 in 5 Facebook users who shared fake news stories were Republicans over 65.

Republican baby boomers are more likely to share #fakenews on Facebook
By Quentin Fottrell
Published: July 16, 2019 6:10 a.m. ET
https://t.co/UO3wx32AP3
The good news for the 2.38 billion people who use Facebook: Most Facebook users did not share any fake news articles during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, according to a recent study but the small number who did were mostly Republican Americans over the age of 65. The findings suggest the need for “renewed attention” to educate “particular vulnerable individuals,” such as aging baby boomers, about fake news or misleading information that appears to resemble a fact-checked news article published by a legitimate and fact-based media outlet, researchers said.


So why are Republican baby boomers more likely to share fake news on Facebook? One theory: As they didn’t grow up with technology, they may be more susceptible to being fooled. (Case in point: the variety of scams that have had success with older Americans by preying on their lack of familiarity with how computers and technology work.)

Younger Americans who grew up with the internet, regardless of their political leanings, tend to be less overwhelmed by stories that cross their news feeds on Facebook and Twitter TWTR, -2.36% and more adept at spotting telltale signs of fake news. “Because of technology, we are inundated by information,” Steven Sloman, professor of cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University, told NPR last year. “We just don’t have time to separate the facts from the falsities. Even fact checkers don’t have time. A message can go viral before any serious truth filter has been applied. This leads to a positive feedback cycle.”

...

The results showed that 90% of these users actually did not share misleading or fake articles and only 8.5% shared one or more fake news articles. A plurality, 18%, of the Facebook users who shared the fake stories were both self-identified Republicans and over the age of 65, the authors concluded, and these individuals shared nearly seven times as many fake news articles as respondents in the youngest age group, ranging in age from 18 to 29.

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Reply Almost 1 in 5 Facebook users who shared fake news stories were Republicans over 65. (Original post)
Roland99 Jul 2019 OP
Guilded Lilly Jul 2019 #1
treestar Jul 2019 #2
sl8 Jul 2019 #3
Wounded Bear Jul 2019 #4
NewJeffCT Jul 2019 #5
Ms. Toad Jul 2019 #6
intheflow Jul 2019 #7

Response to Roland99 (Original post)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 12:31 PM

1. Or they are just assholes.

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Response to Roland99 (Original post)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 12:32 PM

2. Dad and his friends and siblings

They are so gullible. They forget it is not longer vetted and Walter Cronkite is long dead. It seems to have authority for them that it was published, which was a good deal true when they were young.

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Response to Roland99 (Original post)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 12:48 PM

3. Study:

I believe this is the study the article refers to:
https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/1/eaau4586.full

Less than you think: Prevalence and predictors of fake news dissemination on Facebook

Andrew Guess1,*, Jonathan Nagler2 and Joshua Tucker2
See all authors and affiliations

Science Advances 09 Jan 2019:
Vol. 5, no. 1, eaau4586
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aau4586

Abstract
So-called “fake news” has renewed concerns about the prevalence and effects of misinformation in political campaigns. Given the potential for widespread dissemination of this material, we examine the individual-level characteristics associated with sharing false articles during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign. To do so, we uniquely link an original survey with respondents’ sharing activity as recorded in Facebook profile data. First and foremost, we find that sharing this content was a relatively rare activity. Conservatives were more likely to share articles from fake news domains, which in 2016 were largely pro-Trump in orientation, than liberals or moderates. We also find a strong age effect, which persists after controlling for partisanship and ideology: On average, users over 65 shared nearly seven times as many articles from fake news domains as the youngest age group.


INTRODUCTION
One of the most discussed phenomena in the aftermath of the 2016 U.S. presidential election was the spread and possible influence of “fake news”—false or misleading content intentionally dressed up to look like news articles, often for the purpose of generating ad revenue. Scholars and commentators have raised concerns about the implications of fake news for the quality of democratic discourse, as well as the prevalence of misinformation more generally (1). Some have gone so far as to assert that such content had a persuasive impact that could have affected the election outcome, although the best evidence suggests that these claims are farfetched (2). While evidence is growing on the prevalence (3), believability (2), and resistance to corrections (4, 5) of fake news during the 2016 campaign, less is known about the mechanisms behind its spread (6). Some of the earliest journalistic accounts of fake news highlighted its popularity on social media, especially Facebook (7). Visits to Facebook appear to be much more common than other platforms before visits to fake news articles in web consumption data, suggesting a powerful role for the social network (3), but what is the role of social transmission—in particular, social sharing—in the spread of this pernicious form of false political content? Here, we provide important new evidence complementing the small but growing body of literature on the fake news phenomenon.

[...]

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Response to Roland99 (Original post)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 12:52 PM

4. Well, this "over 65" white male stopped blind re-posting years ago...

Got fooled a couple of times. Now, I don't even click on shit very often. And when I do, it is to sites I've at least heard of.

Oh, and I don't do the "greatest hits" and "almost nobody can pass this test" posts either. Whenever I do, I tend to get surges of spam.

I keep track of family and some friends, but that's about it.

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Response to Roland99 (Original post)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 03:07 PM

5. and the other 4 out of 5

were Republicans under 65

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Response to NewJeffCT (Reply #5)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 05:12 PM

6. Not really.

The two most prolific reposters in my facebook fits the demographic. The third and fourth most prolific reposters are both over 65, and are spreading left-leaning fake news.

I do have more friends who are left-leaning - and more over 65 than would be present in a truly representative collection of people. BUT it's not only Republicans spreading fake news, by a long shot. It shouldn't take much more than a quick perusal of GD to tell you that.

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Response to NewJeffCT (Reply #5)

Sun Jul 21, 2019, 11:59 PM

7. Exactly.

1 in 5 being over 65 sounds like ageism and denial that there's a younger demographic supporting a racist monster.

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