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Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:28 PM

Colorado Christian cakeshop sued a third time for discrimination

The owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop -- which won a case before the U.S. Supreme Court recently -- was sued for a third time this week.

Jack Phillips, the Lakewood, Colo. bakery owner who has refused to bake cakes that violate his Christian faith, is being sued again by Autumn Scardina, a transgender woman, for refusing to bake a gender transition cake.

Scardina claims it is textbook LGBT discrimination. But Phillips said she is rehashing old claims that hold no merit.

Phillips describes himself as an artist who uses cakes as "canvas" to express ideas and celebrate events. He has insisted he doesn't want to do something that goes against his faith.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/colorado-christian-cakeshop-sued-a-third-time-for-discrimination/ar-AACJecD

6 replies, 493 views

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Reply Colorado Christian cakeshop sued a third time for discrimination (Original post)
Yo_Mama_Been_Loggin Jun 11 OP
RKP5637 Jun 11 #1
trev Jun 11 #2
Lucid Dreamer Jun 11 #3
Hotler Jun 11 #5
csziggy Jun 11 #6
Initech Jun 11 #4

Response to Yo_Mama_Been_Loggin (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:46 PM

1. He should close his shop to the public and be a private bakery IMO. n/t

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Response to RKP5637 (Reply #1)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:54 PM

2. Yes, let him serve only Christians.

Wonder if that would hold up in court?

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Response to Yo_Mama_Been_Loggin (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 09:26 PM

3. Why does anyone go to a shop where the owner hates them?

Make it easy on yourself and shop someplace else.
Who needs the aggravation of getting insulted?


(Your mileage may vary.)

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Response to Lucid Dreamer (Reply #3)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 09:31 PM

5. +1. King Soopers makes cakes. nt

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Response to Lucid Dreamer (Reply #3)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 09:41 PM

6. Why did people keep going to the lunch counter at the Woolworth's in Greensboro and in Nashville?

It is a civil rights fight. The sit-ins lasted for five months. So long as the courts keep denying people's civil rights, they will keep pushing. More power to them!

The Greensboro sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1960,[2] which led to the Woolworth department store chain removing its policy of racial segregation in the Southern United States.[3] While not the first sit-in of the Civil Rights Movement, the Greensboro sit-ins were an instrumental action, and also the most well-known sit-ins of the Civil Rights Movement. They are considered a catalyst to the subsequent sit-in movement.[4] These sit-ins led to increased national sentiment at a crucial period in US history.[5] The primary event took place at the Greensboro, North Carolina, Woolworth store, now the International Civil Rights Center and Museum.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greensboro_sit-ins


The Nashville sit-ins, which lasted from February 13 to May 10, 1960, were part of a nonviolent direct action campaign to end racial segregation at lunch counters in downtown Nashville, Tennessee. The sit-in campaign, coordinated by the Nashville Student Movement and Nashville Christian Leadership Council, was notable for its early success and emphasis on disciplined nonviolence. It was part of a broader sit-in movement that spread across the southern United States in the wake of the Greensboro sit-ins in North Carolina.

Over the course of the Nashville sit-in campaign, sit-ins were staged at numerous stores in the central business district. Sit-in participants, who consisted mainly of black college students, were often verbally or physically attacked by white onlookers. Despite their refusal to retaliate, over 150 students were eventually arrested for refusing to vacate store lunch counters when ordered to do so by police. At trial, the students were represented by a group of 13 lawyers, headed by Z. Alexander Looby. On April 19, Looby's home was bombed, although he escaped uninjured. Later that day, nearly 4000 people marched to City Hall to confront Mayor Ben West about the escalating violence. When asked if he believed the lunch counters in Nashville should be desegregated, West agreed that they should. After subsequent negotiations between the store owners and protest leaders, an agreement was reached during the first week of May. On May 10, six downtown stores began serving black customers at their lunch counters for the first time.

Although the initial campaign successfully desegregated downtown lunch counters, sit-ins, pickets, and protests against other segregated facilities continued in Nashville until passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which ended overt, legally sanctioned segregation nationwide. Many of the organizers of the Nashville sit-ins went on to become important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_sit-ins

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Response to Yo_Mama_Been_Loggin (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 09:29 PM

4. Seriously - is there only one cake shop in all of Colorado?

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