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Mon May 6, 2019, 02:51 PM

are we to believe that trump is NOT cooking the books on the jobs numbers?

he corrupts everyone who works for them.

he orders them to lie and break the law.

CERTAINLY he has told the Labor Department to deliver a number to his liking.

There is probably 0% chance any numbers released by his administration are not a lie.

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Reply are we to believe that trump is NOT cooking the books on the jobs numbers? (Original post)
EveHammond13 May 2019 OP
emmaverybo May 2019 #1
Captain Stern May 2019 #2
DrToast May 2019 #14
mahatmakanejeeves May 2019 #21
NewJeffCT May 2019 #25
FBaggins May 2019 #3
unblock May 2019 #4
applegrove May 2019 #5
BillyBobBrilliant May 2019 #6
mtnsnake May 2019 #7
TheFarseer May 2019 #27
still_one May 2019 #8
lunatica May 2019 #20
still_one May 2019 #30
lunatica May 2019 #31
MFM008 May 2019 #9
Wellstone ruled May 2019 #10
DrToast May 2019 #13
Wellstone ruled May 2019 #18
mahatmakanejeeves May 2019 #24
Wellstone ruled May 2019 #29
mahatmakanejeeves May 2019 #34
Wellstone ruled May 2019 #35
LexVegas May 2019 #11
delisen May 2019 #12
Poiuyt May 2019 #15
Kilgore May 2019 #17
Poiuyt May 2019 #22
Kilgore May 2019 #16
lunatica May 2019 #19
Locutusofborg May 2019 #23
saidsimplesimon May 2019 #26
nykym May 2019 #28
ck4829 May 2019 #32
Runningdawg May 2019 #33

Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 02:56 PM

1. I think he is cookin

Skewing, spinning, not telling the whole truth, which is that Americans are vastly underemployed.

Was reading in Daily Beast about Japan’s Abe. I was shocked at how he fudges the numbers, all around.

I put nothing past Baby Blimp.

You bring up a real concern.

How to fact check the numbers and get the word out about the reality they mask?

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:04 PM

2. I believe the books aren't being cooked.

It's not like he fired everybody that works for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and replaced them with his own people.

The books weren't being 'cooked' when the unemployment rate was plummeting under Obama (despite many republicans insisting that they were), and they're not being 'cooked' now.

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Response to Captain Stern (Reply #2)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:00 PM

14. +1

There would be whistleblowers all over the place if Trump tried to interfere with their work.

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Response to Captain Stern (Reply #2)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:25 PM

21. This is the correct answer.

The people compiling the data are career employees, not political employees.

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Response to Captain Stern (Reply #2)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:38 PM

25. agreed - and, were the books being cooked

in February when it was only 26K jobs created?

(later revised upwards, but the initial number got the headlines)

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:04 PM

3. Yes. It would be close to impossible for him to do so.

Too many of the people involved are career personnel - and too much of the underlying data is available right away. Any significant change would be obvious too quickly.

Additionally... there are private surveys that parallel much of the jobs data. For instance, I've never been a fan of the ADP series for employment on a month-to-month basis compared to the BLS data, but over time the two series do track well together. That would quickly get out of whack if serious book cooking was occurring.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:15 PM

4. he'd do it if he weren't so damn lazy.

cooking numbers properly takes way too much effort.

and why bother when he can cook the way it's all covered, no matter what actual economists say?

the numbers are what they are. how to interpret them is another story.

"the" unemployment rate is becoming less and less relevant to most people as they struggle with job insecurity, rising health care costs, a need for multiple jobs just to get enough hours, continued automation, etc.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:29 PM

5. Baby boomers are retiring. It is demographics.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:30 PM

6. That would require

intelligence.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:36 PM

7. I'd say there's a 90% chance he's cooking the jobs numbers & fanagling the stock market numbers, too

 

The bounds of his dishonesty are endless.

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Response to mtnsnake (Reply #7)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:56 PM

27. The stock market is going up because

They have changed the system so that everyone is buying stocks such as for their 401k, government pension funds and legalizing stock buybacks. Also by keeping interest rates so low that you have to buy stocks if you want any return.

As for the unemployment numbers, he’s not doing anything different than Obama or Bush even though it’s probably not entirely on the level.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:36 PM

8. Nope, he doesn't control that

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Response to still_one (Reply #8)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:25 PM

20. Who controls that information?

It wouldn’t surprise me if it was someone he appointed.

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Response to lunatica (Reply #20)

Mon May 6, 2019, 06:21 PM

30. Too many people are putting those numbers toegether. They are economists, analysts, etc, and they

work for the U.S. Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics, and have used the same method for calculating the unemployment rate that they have been using for decades. They follow specified protocols, and

They are required to follow certain protocols so the figures are not interfered with.

There are just too many people involved, and they would never get away with it


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Response to still_one (Reply #30)

Mon May 6, 2019, 06:49 PM

31. Thanks. I hope you're right!

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:38 PM

9. exactly what he accused

Obama doing.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:43 PM

10. The real story is this,

the Labor participation rate has change in the last year plus. More and more Workers have given up on Job Search and there for the numbers are skewed to the upside.

Notice how we get a juiced Jobs number the first week of the month and by weeks end the Participation Rate hits. And that is where the rubber hits the road my friends.

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Response to Wellstone ruled (Reply #10)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:58 PM

13. Please stop this nonsense

They’re part of the same report.

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Response to DrToast (Reply #13)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:19 PM

18. Yes it does,

the bitch is,we do not here the participation rate till days later. All the Media only talks about the Jobs numbers and the rest is,oh well.

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Response to Wellstone ruled (Reply #18)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:32 PM

24. It shows up every month here at DU, on (usually) the first Friday of the month.

Lately, UpInArms and BumRushDaShow have posted at 8:34 a.m., give or take a few minutes, so the release is all of four minutes old. They use good sources (MarketWatch and the Washington Post respectively). I go right to the BLS itself and copy and paste their statement in the thread. The participation rate is there for all who want to see it.

The only difference I know of at BLS is that there is now a commissioner instead of an acting commissioner.

The teevee news is not going to report on a lot of things, but they can found with not too much difficulty.

Links to earlier reports

The mind-numbing rant, based on a version posted on the first Friday in September 2016:

I used to run this every month in the commentary in the zeroeth post. It explains just about every aspect of the monthly report.
....

[center]Introduction[/center]

Good morning, Freepers and DUers alike. I especially welcome our good friends from across the aisle. You're paying for this information too, so I am absolutely delighted to have you participate in this thread. Please, everyone, put aside your differences long enough to digest the information. After that, you can engage in your usual donnybrook.

Full disclosure: I do not work for BLS, nor am I friends with anyone over there. I'm just someone who appreciates the work they do. My sole connection with the agency is that I've been in the building to pick up some publications.
....

Let's begin with a couple of questions:

[center]What Is the Bureau of Labor Statistics?
Why Does It Release All These Numbers Every Month?
[/center]

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is a unit of the United States Department of Labor. It is the principal fact-finding agency for the U.S. government in the broad field of labor economics and statistics and serves as a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System. The BLS is a governmental statistical agency that collects, processes, analyzes, and disseminates essential statistical data to the American public, the U.S. Congress, other Federal agencies, State and local governments, business, and labor representatives. The BLS also serves as a statistical resource to the Department of Labor, and conducts research into how much families need to earn to be able to enjoy a decent standard of living.

The BLS data must satisfy a number of criteria, including relevance to current social and economic issues, timeliness in reflecting today’s rapidly changing economic conditions, accuracy and consistently high statistical quality, and impartiality in both subject matter and presentation. To avoid the appearance of partiality, the dates of major data releases are scheduled more than a year in advance, in coordination with the Office of Management and Budget.

[font color="red"]New material, added August 29, 2016:[/font] Print title, Washington Post, Saturday, March 10, 2012, front page, above the fold: "Watching the clock: Monthly data release is an economic, political obsession timed to the nanosecond"

‘Jobs Day’: Monthly release of employment data an economic, political obsession

By Eli Saslow
http://twitter.com/elisaslow

March 9, 2012

The release of employment numbers by the Bureau of Labor Statistics has long been a ritual in Washington, but lately it has turned into an obsession during an election year defined by economic instability. Once each month, a nondescript government agency compiles and releases 24 tables of economic data that have come to define the 2012 election and so much else. Republican presidential candidates turn the numbers into speeches. The president’s staff monitors how they affect his approval rating. The Federal Reserve reevaluates interest rates. Investors prepare for the stock market to rise or fall, sometimes swinging in value by $150 billion in the minutes after the report is released.
....

The raw data had arrived at the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), like always, on Wednesday the week before the report’s release: millions of characters representing survey information from 55,000 households; and then, a few days later, monthly payroll data from 486,000 businesses. Kosanovich’s boss posted a two-page schedule on the office wall, detailing the tasks ahead for a team of more than 20 economists. They would be required to make a series of six deadlines. Their work would undergo 15 fact checks and then 15 clearance reviews. They would sit together in a windowless conference room and read aloud from their eventual creation, a three-page news release and 24 data tables, debating commas and verbs for hours on end.

They would do it all with absolute discretion during an eight-day security lockdown, signing confidentiality agreements each morning, encrypting their computers and locking data into a safe every time they walked 10 yards away to use a bathroom. “Is your workstation secure?” asked a sign in the hallway. They all remembered the last security miscue, in November 2008 — the accidental transmission of some data to one wire service a full 25 seconds before the report’s scheduled release, an incident that had necessitated a series of internal investigations and revisions.

“We always tape paper over the windows of the conference room or draw the shades,” Kosanovich said about her typical routine during a lockdown. She made a habit of refraining from answering phone calls or e-mails from unknown numbers and never discussing data outside her office. For eight days, nobody visited her team’s floor at BLS without a security clearance. The custodial staff did not empty their trash until the report was released.
....

....

[center]Complaint Department[/center]

I post this information on a nonpartisan basis. I am not here to make elected officials of any party or persuasion look good. I am certain that the people who compile these data are of the same outlook. They are civil servants. They do not work for a party; they work for you, the American people.

My only contribution is to cut and paste a few paragraphs from the BLS and then, in the commentary, link to some sources that I feel are trustworthy. I hope people come away with a better understanding of the data after reading this thread. Once again, I do not work for BLS, but I will nonetheless try to assist if I can.

If you feel the Bureau of Labor Statistics is handing out bunk, start here:

Point of Contact for Complaints Concerning Information Quality

Affected persons who believe that the Bureau of Labor Statistics has disseminated information that does not meet its guidelines or those of the Department of Labor or Office of Management and Budget, and who wish to file a formal complaint may send their complaint by mail, e-mail, or fax to:

Division of Management Systems
Bureau of Labor Statistics
U.S. Department of Labor
2 Massachusetts Avenue, N.E., Room 4080
Washington, D.C., 20212-0001
E-mail: dataqa@bls.gov
Fax: (202) 691-5111

Complainants should:

Identify themselves and indicate where and how they can be reached;
Identify, as specifically as possible, the information in question;
Indicate how they are affected by the information about which they are complaining;
Carefully describe the nature of the complaint, including an explanation of why they believe the information does not comply with OMB, Departmental, or agency-specific guidelines; and
Describe the change requested and the reason why the agency should make the change.

Failure to include this information may result in a complainant not receiving a response to the complaint or greatly reducing the usefulness or timeliness of any response. Complainants should be aware that they bear the burden of establishing that they are affected persons and showing the need and justification for the correction they are seeking, including why the information being complained about does not comply with applicable guidelines.


[center]How Do You Define Unemployment?
The Large Print Giveth, and the Fine Print Taketh Away.
[/center]

Long ago, a DUer pointed out that, if I'm going to post the link to the press release, I should include the link to all the tables that provide additional ways of examining the data. Specifically, I should post a link to Table A-15. Alternative measures of labor underutilization. Table A-15 includes those who are not considered unemployed, on the grounds that they have become discouraged about the prospects of finding a job and have given up looking. Here is that link:

Table A-15. Alternative measures of labor underutilization

Also, hat tip, Recursion: How the Government Measures Unemployment


[center]What About Employment on Farms?[/center]

[font color="red"]New material, added May 4, 2018:[/font]

Note that the BLS measures only "nonfarm payroll employment."

Nonfarm payrolls

I'm hoping the following link goes to an impartial site:

What is 'Nonfarm Payroll'

So who measures employment on farms? Hmmmmmm....

United States Department of Agriculture
Economic Research Service

Farm Labor

ERS provides information on a range of farm labor issues, including:

Size and composition of the U.S. agricultural workforce (self-employed versus hired)

Recent trends in the employment of hired farmworkers

Demographic characteristics of hired farmworkers, including age, sex, and nativity

Geographic distribution of hired farmworkers (all occupations)

Wages of hired farmworkers

Labor cost share of total gross revenues

H-2A temporary agricultural visa program

Adverse Effect Wage Rate (AEWR)

Legal status and migration practices of hired crop farmworkers

Finally, we provide links to key data sources with summaries.

[font color="red"]New material, added August 8, 2016:[/font]

This appeared at the top of page A2 in the Wednesday, July 27, 2016, print edition of The Wall Street Journal. as "Jobless Picture is Open to Interpretation."

Jobless Picture is Open to Interpretation

Gauges used to measure unemployment vary in how they define who is out of work {print: "Political campaigns clash over different ways of measuring unemployment"}



By Josh Zumbrun
josh.zumbrun@wsj.com
@JoshZumbrun

July 26, 2016 7:56 p.m. ET

Because political campaigns can rise and fall on the health of the economy, spats often flare over the gauges used to measure growth and unemployment.

The latest dust-up, raised by the campaign of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, focuses on the monthly employment numbers. A long streak of hiring has nudged the jobless rate down to 4.9%. ... Donald Trump Jr., the nominee’s son, recently criticized the official statistics as “artificial numbers…massaged to make the existing economy look good.”

The nominee himself has said unemployment is far higher than the Labor Department’s headline 4.9% rate would suggest, part of his message that the economy is in a dire state. After he won the New Hampshire primary in February, Mr. Trump called the official jobless figures “phony” and said the real number could be as high as 42%.

This isn’t the first time people have cast aspersions on the jobs numbers in an election year, but the Trump claim is also part of a larger discussion over how best to assess the health of the labor market.

....


[center]Why Won't You Talk About the Labor Force Participation Rate (LFPR)?[/center]

Every month in certain circles, someone will cite the labor force participation rate as a cause for concern. Let's look at that right now.

[font color="red"]New material, added September 30, 2016:[/font]

September 2016

Labor force participation: what has happened since the peak?

The labor force participation rate is the percentage of the civilian noninstitutional population 16 years and older that is working or actively looking for work. It is an important labor market measure because it represents the relative amount of labor resources available for the production of goods and services. After rising for more than three decades, the overall labor force participation rate peaked in early 2000 and subsequently trended down. In recent years, the movement of the baby-boom population into age groups that generally exhibit low labor force participation has contributed to the decline in the overall participation rate. From 2000 to 2015, most of the major demographic groups saw a decrease in labor force participation. Teenagers experienced the largest drop in participation, which coincided with a rise in their school enrollment rate. Young adults 20 to 24 years also showed a decline in labor force participation, but the decrease was not as steep as that for teenagers. The labor force participation rate of women 25 to 54 years also fell, with the decrease more pronounced for women who did not attend college. The labor force participation rate of men 25 to 54 years continued its long-term decline. As in the past, the decrease in participation among men with less education was greater than that of men with more education. However, labor force participation rates of men and women 55 years and older rose from 2000 to 2009 and subsequently leveled off.

[font color="red"]New material, added July 31, 2016:[/font]

Title in the print edition of the Washington Post, page A17, Wednesday, July 27, 2016: "The unemployment-rate 'conspiracy' that isn't"

A popular conspiracy theory is spreading in the Trump family. It’s totally false.

By Matt O'Brien July 26
matthew.obrien@washpost.com
@ObsoleteDogma

The unemployment rate is not a conspiracy. It is not manipulated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And anyone who suggests otherwise is either uninformed, or trying to misinform others.

Which is to say that you shouldn't listen to Donald Trump & Co. For a year now, the alleged billionaire has insisted that the "real" unemployment rate is something like 42 percent instead of the 4.9 percent it actually is. He hasn't said how he's gotten this — maybe it's from the same "extremely credible source" who told him President Obama's birth certificate was fake? (1) — but the simplest explanation is that he's just ballparking how many adults don't work. That's 40.4 percent right now. The problem with using that number, though, is that it counts college students and stay-at-home parents and retirees as being equally "unemployed" as people who are actively looking for work but can't find any. So it doesn't tell us too much, at least not on its own, unless you think it's a problem that we have more 70-year-olds than we used to.

(1)

Or unless conspiracy theories are one of your favorite accessories, as seems to be the case with the father, and now the son, Donald Trump Jr. On Sunday, he told CNN's Jake Tapper that the official unemployment numbers are "artificial" ones that are "massaged to make the existing economy look good" and "this administration look good."
....



Source: BLS

....
The boring truth is that the economy is in a lot better shape than it was when Obama took office, but that it could be in better shape still. The recovery, in other words, still has a ways to go. But that's a lot different from saying that we have 40 percent unemployment and that the government is trying to cover it up. That just suggests you don't understand — or don't want to accurately describe — how stats work and you don't know how to look up the ones you think the BLS is hiding. ... It's not what you'd expect from a major party presidential candidate.

[font color="red"]New material, added June 27, 2016:[/font]

Wonkblog

[link:https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/06/20/why-americas-men-arent-working/|
Why America’s men aren’t working]

By Ylan Q. Mui June 20

The national unemployment rate has fallen by more than half since the nation emerged from the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. It peaked at 10 percent in 2010 and stood at just 4.7 percent last month.

That’s mostly good news: Private employers have added more than 14 million jobs. About 2 million people have been out of a job for six months or longer, far too many but only about a quarter of the number of long-term unemployed people seven years ago. By almost every measure, the labor market has made incredible progress.

But there’s one statistic that has been vexing economists. The size of the nation’s workforce -- known as the labor force participation rate -- continues to fall. Since the start of the downturn, the percentage of that population that has a job or is looking for one has dropped more than 3 percentage points, to 62.6 percent, a level not seen since the 1970s.

{America’s jobs market has had a great 2016. Will it last?}

The problem is particularly pronounced among men between the ages of 25 and 54, traditionally considered the prime working years. Their participation rate has been declining for decades, but the drop-off accelerated during the recession. The high mark was 98 percent in 1954, and it now stands at 88 percent. A new analysis from the White House’s Council of Economic Advisers, slated for release Monday, found that the United States now has the third-lowest participation rate for “prime-age men” among the world’s developed countries.
....



....
People in prison are not counted as part of the population for the purposes of labor market statistics. At first blush, that would actually boost the participation rate: A smaller population means the share in the workforce is larger. But in reality, there are immense and well-documented barriers to the job market for workers once they leave prison. And the gloomy prospects of the formerly incarcerated outweigh the statistical benefit of having a large prison population.



....
Ylan Q. Mui is a financial reporter at The Washington Post covering the Federal Reserve and the economy. Follow @ylanmui

[font color="red"]New material, added January 2016:[/font] People who are not in the labor force: why aren't they working?

Beyond the Numbers

December 2015 | Vol. 4 / No. 15

EMPLOYMENT & UNEMPLOYMENT

People who are not in the labor force: why aren't they working?

By Steven F. Hipple

People who are neither working nor looking for work are counted as “not in the labor force,” according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Since 2000, the percentage of people in this group has increased. Data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) and its Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) provide some insight into why people are not in the labor force. The ASEC is conducted in the months of February through April and includes questions about work and other activities in the previous calendar year. For example, data collected in 2015 are for the 2014 calendar year, and data collected in 2005 are for the 2004 calendar year.1 In the ASEC, people who did not work at all in the previous year are asked to give the main reason they did not work. Interviewers categorize survey participants’ verbatim responses into the following categories: ill health or disabled; retired;2 home responsibilities; going to school; could not find work;3 and other reasons.

This Beyond the Numbers article examines data on those who were not in the labor force during 2004 and 2014 and the reasons they gave for not working. The data are limited to people who neither worked nor looked for work during the previous year.

This July 2014 report from the Council of Economic Advisers addresses the LFPR:

THE LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION RATE SINCE 2007: CAUSES AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS

(Hat tip, Adrahil: Look deeper.)

[font color="red"]New material:[/font] Here's a Power Point (or equivalent) presentation given by Jason Furman, Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, before the National Press Club on August 6, 2015. If you go to the next-to-the-last slide, you'll see that the long-term projected trend is down:

"Trends in Labor Force Participation", 8/6/15

(Hat tip, progree: Over the past month, over the past year, and since February 2010)

[font color="red"]New material:[/font] Paul Vigna had a comment about the LFPR in the December 4, 2015, MoneyBeat column about the November figures:

8:55 am

Breaking down the participation rate
by Paul Vigna

Here’s what we mean when we talk about the participation rate and employment-population ratio.

There are 251.7 million people in the “civilian noninstitutional population,” according to the BLS (this is all contained in this chart). This is the number of people over age 16 who are not in jail or health-care facilities or the military.

Of that group, 157.3 million comprise the civilian labor force. The ratio of the second group to the first is 62.5%. This is the labor force participation rate, the number of people who could be in the labor force – either working or looking for a job – who are in the labor force.

There are 149.3 million people working. The ratio of that group to the overall civilian population is 59.3%. This the employment-population ratio, the number of people who could be working who actually are working.

Why do these number matter? Well, if you just looked at the raw data, you’d see the numbers rising, more or less, month after month. That’s not because the economy’s so rip-roaring, but because the number of people in the nation keeps rising. So you need the ratios to get a sense of how strong the labor force really is.

The labor-force participation rate remains near multi-decade lows, and whether that’s due to demographics, as in people retiring, or weak job opportunities, or whatever, it points to one sort of unavoidable problem: the economy cannot grow at its full potential if you simply don’t have enough people contributing.

Oh, and for the record, there are 94.4 million people not in the labor force.

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Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #24)

Mon May 6, 2019, 06:09 PM

29. Hey thank you for this info.

Took me a few minutes to bookmark all this info links. Hours of reading and link chasing ahead,thanks again.

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Response to Wellstone ruled (Reply #29)

Tue May 7, 2019, 09:34 AM

34. You are welcome. It is my pleasure to put this stuff together.

DU might be the leading place to check online for the monthly BLS employment report.

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Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #34)

Tue May 7, 2019, 11:56 AM

35. The first Firday of the month

for us is usually nuts and I miss so much real stuff. What is really glaring is the Consolidation of certain Consumer Goods and Services. And the ownership of those Consolidated Congolmerates.

After fifty two years in B to B type sales,usually the tell tale signs are there as to what is happening on the ground when it comes to the economy. And to whom it is or isn't impacting. Something is about to blow up with all the inventories of unsold goods that we are seeing in the retail sector. Traffic counts and average sales ticket's are dropping even with inflation due to Tariff mark ups.

What seems to be lurking is,the expansion of the Underground economy where many have gone to a all cash daily life style. This will impact all of us down the road.

May's numbers should be a clue as to the rest of the year.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:50 PM

11. It unbelievably hard for me to find and hire decent manufacturing labor right now.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 03:56 PM

12. I see numerous Help Wanted signs everyday

Mainly fast food and retail and so I think many people are moving up the job ladder or going to school; particularly younger workers.

It makes sense since the crash is now a decade ago and so this does not necessarily indicate that Trump is responsible.

These are entry level jobs and while they pay better than they used to, the pay is not enough to live comfortably-rents and hidden inflation are eating up paychecks.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:12 PM

15. I'm sure the jobs numbers are accurate, but they don't tell the whole story

Many of those jobs are in the low paying retail or service field. A better indicator would be real income adjusted for inflation. There, we can see that incomes (except for the top CEOs) have been stagnating since the late 70s. The only people who have been prospering during this economy are the top 1%.

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Response to Poiuyt (Reply #15)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:16 PM

17. See my post #16

Maybe in your area, but no here.
Our employer is offering us $500 if we refer someone who gets hired.

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Response to Kilgore (Reply #17)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:25 PM

22. I was referring to the national median income

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:12 PM

16. Regular ads on the local radio looking for workers

Drivers, mechanics, electricians, sheetmetal, plumbers, pipefitters, welders.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:22 PM

19. Excellent observation!

We need to look under our beds to check for the boogeyman!

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:31 PM

23. No and the Republicans accused Obama of the same thing

The people who work for the Bureau of Labor Statistics are career civil servants. Presidents come and go, they work regardless. If the numbers were faked whistleblowers would tell us so.
Every state in the nation gathers its own unemployment data. If the federal data was grossly different from the state by state data, it would be immediately obvious. Some of the most Democratic-controlled states in the nation have among the lowest unemployment rates (ie Vermont: 2.3%, Hawaii: 2.8%, Virginia: 2.9%).

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:41 PM

26. It's not just the Labor Department

reporting the jobs numbers. Giving rumpie credit for the good numbers is where I object.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 04:58 PM

28. Most administrations

Leave out the number of people who have just given up looking for a job.

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 06:55 PM

32. K&R, the Trump Admin is nothing but corruption and lies

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Response to EveHammond13 (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2019, 07:20 PM

33. If I fire 3 FT employees and replace them with 12 PT employees did I just create 9 jobs or 12?

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