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Fri Apr 12, 2019, 12:40 PM

the google doodle for today honours the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus movement


Experience the anniversary and become part of the Bauhaus Movement



The Bauhaus is to this day the most internationally influential think tank for architecture, art and design. If the Bauhaus stands out from the history of modernism, it is because it was the model for extraordinarily innovative, open, experimental educational and production processes. The core of the Bauhaus idea was to unite art and craftsmanship and make them accessible to everyone. The products were to go into industrial mass production in order to revolutionize everyday life and create a new, better world. This utopian thinking shaped all of the Bauhaus's fields of activity.

For this purpose Walter Gropius developed the Bauhaus apprenticeship, which was not about a classical education, but about the holistic development of personality. At the heart of the design training was experimentation and design in the Bauhaus workshops, where the separation of teaching and practice was largely abolished. The handling of materials was tested at the Bauhaus in a pedagogically new and experimental way. The preliminary course, with which the training at the State Bauhaus began, still shapes the teaching of numerous art and architecture colleges worldwide today.

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https://shop.bauhaus-movement.com/

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3. Some of its lesser known trailblazers are female artists

Painters Paul Klee and Wassily Kandkinsky, sculptor and designer Oskar Schlemmer, and painter and photographer László Moholy-Nagy are among the best known members of the Bauhaus school.

But female artists also made valuable, groundbreaking contributions, although their names are not cited as often.

Industrial designer Marianne Brandt, weavers Gunta Stölzl and Benita Koch-Otte​, textile artist Otti Berger, and designer Alma Siedhoff-Buscher​ are among the many women who wrote part of the Bauhaus's history.

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Reply the google doodle for today honours the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus movement (Original post)
niyad Apr 12 OP
Zoonart Apr 12 #1
niyad Apr 12 #3
Zoonart Apr 12 #6
struggle4progress Apr 12 #2
niyad Apr 12 #4
hunter Apr 12 #7
Codeine Apr 12 #5
hunter Apr 12 #8

Response to niyad (Original post)

Fri Apr 12, 2019, 12:46 PM

1. I recommend:

From Bauhaus to Our House, by Tom Wolf, for further reading.

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Response to Zoonart (Reply #1)

Fri Apr 12, 2019, 01:13 PM

3. thank you for sharing this.

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Response to niyad (Reply #3)

Fri Apr 12, 2019, 01:25 PM

6. Anytime, niyad.

Enjoy.

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Response to niyad (Original post)

Fri Apr 12, 2019, 01:09 PM

2. Alma

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #2)

Fri Apr 12, 2019, 01:19 PM

4. snort!!!!! thank you soooooooo mcuh for sharing that--has definitely brightened my day!!

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Response to niyad (Original post)

Fri Apr 12, 2019, 01:22 PM

5. I knew Peter Murphy was looking a bit old,

but DAMN!, 100 years?

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Response to niyad (Original post)

Fri Apr 12, 2019, 02:53 PM

8. This reminds me of one of my favorite university professors...

... who sadly passed away more than twenty years ago. He was prominent enough to have his obituary in the New York Times.

I'll not forget his enthusiastic lectures about the Bauhaus movement, and his patience with me, even though I could be at times extremely obnoxious.

I was a Biology major with a minor in English. The English minor bought me a widely ranging liberal arts education.

Figuring I was going to make the best of college, I often managed to get into smaller upper division classes taught by prominent people, which was hell on my grade point average, but worth every "C" I suffered for it. (I had a roommate who'd say things like, "Geez, Hunter, Why are you taking a class from that guy? He never gives anyone an "A." )

Anyways, my term paper covered some aspects of the Bauhaus movement, but my tone was mildly sarcastic. When I got my report card back this professor had given me an "F." At the first opportunity I stormed into his office, furious that he'd given me an "F." He and I both knew I'd done the work. In the course of our discussion I later fell apart confessing my false bravado, insecurities and countless other sins -- a lot of crap that would try anyone's patience. He eventually told me my work actually deserved a "B," minus the attitude, and he changed my grade.

I asked him what he'd have done if I hadn't come back.

He told me he would have left me with the "F."

I learned a lot from him, not to mention an appreciation of the Bauhaus movement.

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