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Sat Mar 23, 2019, 11:18 PM

What is 'chlorinated chicken'? Seems US cannot export it to EU but could to post-Brexit UK

Heard about this watching James O'Brien's attempts to explain the problems post-Brexit UK will have at the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

As I understand it, he claims we wash chicken carcasses in chlorine to try to destroy the stuff that sticks to them because of the filthy way we raise them. Is this true? Do most people in US know this, and I haven't been paying attention?

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Reply What is 'chlorinated chicken'? Seems US cannot export it to EU but could to post-Brexit UK (Original post)
bobbieinok Mar 2019 OP
mr_lebowski Mar 2019 #1
Harker Mar 2019 #2
unblock Mar 2019 #3
mr_lebowski Mar 2019 #5
PSPS Mar 2019 #4
Celerity Mar 2019 #6
Aussie105 Mar 2019 #7
dawg day Mar 2019 #8
Historic NY Mar 2019 #9
muriel_volestrangler Mar 2019 #10
BSdetect Mar 2019 #11

Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sat Mar 23, 2019, 11:28 PM

1. I dunno, but chlorine is quite a volatile (meaning it quickly evaporates and disappears) gas ...

Also, we swim in chlorinated water, and our tap water is treated with chlorine, and we eat a metric TON of 'sodium chloride', so ... not prepared to freak out about 'chlorinated chicken' without a deeper understanding of just how 'bad' it is.

Is the 'brined' chicken I bought at the store the other day 'chlorinated'? I would tend to guess that it is, at least in some sense. Salt being 1/2 chlorine and all.

But that's just me

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sat Mar 23, 2019, 11:33 PM

2. It seems odd to me that anyone

who would eat dead birds might be more troubled by something that might be "stuck" to them.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sat Mar 23, 2019, 11:36 PM

3. As I understand it, the chlorine itself isn't the problem.

The chlorine itself is roughly akin to chlorine being used to make drinking water safe. It remains present in small enough quantities to not be a problem, and it kills germs both in water and in chicken.

The problem is that chicken producers who chlorinate at the end of the slaughtering process can then rely on that to kill germs and therefore allow cheaper and less sanitary conditions during the chickens' lives and during the slaughtering process.

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Response to unblock (Reply #3)

Sat Mar 23, 2019, 11:52 PM

5. Sounds kinda gross, I'll admit, but ...

If the chlorine does in fact kill all the germs, and you're not eating them ... I'm not entirely sure it matters?

I mean, as long as 'internally sick' chickens aren't part of our food, and we're just talking external germs. Which then die from chlorine.

If we are allowing actual sick chickens to be part of our food ... and treating them with chlorine, that becomes a lot more distressing to me, because that would involve a LOT of chlorine to kill off germs. Like it has get ALL in the tissue ... that's a nasty thought. You're not just 'lightly steaming' them with chlorine, you'd be like injecting the tissue with it. Who knows if you kill all the nasties.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sat Mar 23, 2019, 11:44 PM

4. Want to be horrified? Look at the foods that are sold here that are banned by the EU.

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Response to PSPS (Reply #4)

Sat Mar 23, 2019, 11:57 PM

6. plus a million

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Mar 24, 2019, 12:06 AM

7. Chicken necks

is what I feed my dogs as part of their regular diet.

At times, they smell of bleach.

As far as I know, washing chicken parts with bleach post processing kills surface germs, so the meat is safer to eat, or lasts longer before smelling off.

I know the ones I buy, last for 2 days before going smelly, while the ones that smell like bleach initially, last a day or more longer.
Dogs don't mind either way.

But raw chicken is a known carrier of lots of surface germs, so bleach washing is for safety. Wash it thoroughly before cooking either way, and cook it thoroughly.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Mar 24, 2019, 12:12 AM

8. It's a way to kill salmonella germs

I don't know if it's good or bad, but it's effective in doing that, apparently.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Mar 24, 2019, 01:29 AM

9. The farm market chicken I buy...

tastes better and isn't a slimy as the grocery store variety. They buy from local farms and one larger processor with a high reputation.

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Mar 24, 2019, 06:06 AM

10. It's largely about the conditions the chickens can be reared in

It's not consuming chlorine itself that the EU is worried about - in fact in 2005 the European Food Safety Authority said that "exposure to chlorite residues arising from treated poultry carcasses would be of no safety concern". Chlorine-rinsed bagged salads are common in the UK and other countries in the EU.

But the EU believes that relying on a chlorine rinse at the end of the meat production process could be a way of compensating for poor hygiene standards - such as dirty or crowded abattoirs.
...
A study from the University of Southampton last year found that chlorine could make food-borne pathogens undetectable, giving lower microbial counts in testing, but without actually killing them - so they might remain capable of causing disease.

They tested chlorine-washed strains of food-borne bacteria on roundworms and all of them died.

The World Health Organization has also cast some doubts over how much bacteria chlorine kills, and studies of its effectiveness have had mixed results.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47440562

https://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Headlines/Food-Safety/UK-defends-poultry-standards

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Response to bobbieinok (Original post)

Sun Mar 24, 2019, 06:51 AM

11. I thought irradiating chicken was common here in the USA?

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