HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Recycle Your Christmas Tr...

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 08:44 PM

Recycle Your Christmas Tree To Help Wildlife

BY ANDREA POWELL

Every year, over 25 million Christmas trees are sold in the United States and used for decoration in homes but they can have a purpose after the holiday too.

Christmas is over and you are taking the ornaments, lights and tinsel off the tree. Before you toss your Christmas tree to the curb, consider donating it to wildlife. Many animals benefit from recycled trees that they use as a toy or a home.

snip






https://blog.theanimalrescuesite.greatergood.com/recycle-christmas-tree/

16 replies, 465 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread

Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 09:30 PM

1. I watching right now for Xmas trees to be thrown out.

Since I have no good trees by my bird feeder in the yard (cat tv for watching out the window) for the birds to roost, in the fall I drive a steel fence post in the ground near it and then after Xmas I watch for a good tree and then I just bungee it to the post and it lasts all winter.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to elocs (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 09:38 PM

2. What a great idea!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 09:38 PM

3. Well, I'm both ways in the use of live trees...

Don't get me wrong, I'm on both sides of the issue, to use live Christmas trees vs. not using during the holidays.

Of course the pitfalls are fire hazard and that you're cutting down live trees to decorate for the holidays (different if you use a live tree in a planter and then plant later). The other side (cutting the live trees) is that I know these trees are grown by the tens of thousands just for this purpose (I had a christmas tree farm too, but actually is a lot of work to maintain so got out of the business).

So I'm undecided (live or cut). However, when I was growing the trees over the whole year, I noticed that lots of birds and other smaller critters used the trees for a variety of things, shelter, food, etc. The fields actually looked pretty good to me too when all of the trees were in the field, especially during snowstorms, and there was really no easy way to describe the feelings I had when I would walk in the fields w/ the trees.

Cutting them probably won't do the environment a lot of harm, so I decided whatever one decides (live or cut), more power to them. When I grew the trees, I usually would lose about 9 or so trees out of 10 trees originally planted (and mostly due to the elements, and surprising enough, I lost quite a few of them to deer, who would eat them up. They (the deer) would also damage the trees severely when in rutting season. The other trees would died out due to lack of rain (it was somewhat dry where I was at during the summers) or other reasons.

And of course the suggestions in the article in this original post are great. I would sometimes cut out a section of dead trees, and pile into a big pile, and they loved it (the critters).

Sorry about rambling but I saw this article and ...

Hope you all enjoyed your XMAS! A prosperous 2019 to all.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #3)

Sun Dec 30, 2018, 12:46 AM

12. We manage the trees on our farm to encourage wildlife

When we first bought it we did a lot of clearing but followed that up by planting several thousand trees of different varieties - dogwood, red cedar, loblolly pine, sycamore, and sawtooth oak. We also let "volunteer" trees grow up at various places.

Periodically we clear parts of the farm - just did that in the area where the barn burned down last year - but rather than make burn piles, we make brush piles as shelter for the birds and other animals. Where they are no danger to buildings or fences we leave dead trees for the woodpeckers - probably why we have seen every species of woodpecker known to live in this area.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 10:16 PM

4. I'm glad you included wildlife (or wildcat) sanctuaries

The big cats have such fun with the trees!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 10:26 PM

5. My town mulches them...

And uses the mulch in local parks.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Adrahil (Reply #5)

Sun Dec 30, 2018, 06:55 AM

15. Mine mulches them as well & makes the mulch available to whoever wants it. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 10:28 PM

6. I don't know where to find lions and tigers in Denver.

ohh, a zoo..they need ten thousand trees?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Demonaut (Reply #6)

Sun Dec 30, 2018, 12:02 AM

10. You obviously didn't read the article. That's okay. It was merely a suggestion.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Reply #10)

Sun Dec 30, 2018, 12:07 AM

11. true but she left out other more practical and achievable ways of recycling

that everyone would love to try

I wish I knew of one.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Demonaut (Reply #11)

Sun Dec 30, 2018, 01:22 AM

13. The city I live in will mulch them. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 11:08 PM

7. What a wonderful way to recycle!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 11:13 PM

8. I just use it to add to my brush piles in the backyard

The joy of having land is that I can build big stacks of logs, sticks and dead stuff where the animals can shelter and nest, and not have to worry about neighbors calling the cops on me

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2018, 11:16 PM

9. NY. mulches them

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sun Dec 30, 2018, 01:33 AM

14. an aside. I worked at a large 'home improvement store' for 10 years and all the leftover trees...

were destroyed.

We weren't allowed to give them away on Christmas Eve, or donate them for mulch the day after. On 26, all the left-over trees that weren't sold went straight to the compacter.

It was the most disgusting smell of trash and concentrated evergreen, like snorting straight pine-sol. I would always avoid the back for a few days

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to catbyte (Original post)

Sun Dec 30, 2018, 07:02 AM

16. "Here's what happens to unsold Christmas trees"

[link:https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2018/12/07/christmas-tree-vendor-reveals-what-happens-unsold-holiday-trees/2241031002/|

Here's an interesting use that I never knew of:
"In coastal areas that get ravaged by hurricanes and erosion, left-over Christmas trees can be fastened together, staked down and used to trap sand.

"A dry Christmas tree is a perfect foundation for the creation of sand dunes. Over time, the tree will break down, but it gives time for plants around them to take root," Malaga said.

Healthy sand dunes are the first line of defense during tropical storms because they are able to absorb the impact of destructive winds and waves."

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread