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Fri Dec 7, 2018, 12:38 AM

Sails make a comeback as shipping tries to go green


Finnish startup company Norsepower installed its rotor sail technology on the Maersk Pelican tanker, Aug. 29, 2018, in Rotterdam, Netherlands, in the first such installation on a tanker as the shipping industry tries new solutions in an effort to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The Maersk Pelican oil tanker is testing Norsepower’s 30 meter (98 foot) deck-mounted spinning columns, which convert wind into thrust based on an idea first floated nearly a century ago. Transport’s contribution to earth-warming emissions are the subject of investigations as negotiators gather in Katowice, Poland, for U.N. COP24 climate talks

Shipping, like aviation, isn't covered by the Paris agreement because of the difficulty attributing their emissions to individual nations, but environmental activists say industry efforts are needed. Ships belch out nearly 1 billion tons of carbon dioxide a year, accounting for 2-3 percent of global greenhouse gases.

The emissions are projected to grow between 50 to 250 percent by 2050 if no action is taken.
Notoriously resistant to change, the shipping industry is facing up to the need to cut its use of cheap but dirty "bunker fuel" that powers the global fleet of 50,000 vessels — the backbone of world trade.

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Reply Sails make a comeback as shipping tries to go green (Original post)
yortsed snacilbuper Friday OP
Hermit-The-Prog Friday #1
ProudLib72 Friday #2
yortsed snacilbuper Friday #3
ProudLib72 Friday #7
dumbcat Friday #8
ProudLib72 Friday #9
Brother Buzz Friday #4
yortsed snacilbuper Friday #6
Brother Buzz Friday #10
Brother Buzz Friday #5

Response to yortsed snacilbuper (Original post)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 12:56 AM

1. every little bit helps


On a windy day, Norsepower says rotors can replace up to 50 percent of a ship's engine propulsion. Overall, the company says it can cut fuel consumption by 7 to 10 percent.

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Response to yortsed snacilbuper (Original post)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 01:23 AM

2. It just makes good business sense

I'd like to see the initial outlay versus how long it takes to recoup that cost if their shipping prices don't change.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #2)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 01:32 PM

3. "It just makes good business sense"

true that.

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Response to yortsed snacilbuper (Reply #3)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 05:34 PM

7. So I was googling around and found out that Finland produces zero oil

What's interesting to me is that they get nearly all their oil from Russia, while Norway has major oil reserves. That just seems really odd. But whatever, you know that part of this is to reduce dependence on Russian oil specifically. And, if you look at the players in the article, you'll see that the shipping company is a startup and there is another startup based in NY that is making collapsible "sails". I think that's a pretty smart thing for startups to do. These guys are planning for the future, whereas the major shipping companies are kind of tied to old technology. It would be much more difficult to retrofit a twenty year old cargo ship than build a brand new one using the technology.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #7)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 05:54 PM

8. If you look at a map

it may become a little less odd.

"What's interesting to me is that they get nearly all their oil from Russia, while Norway has major oil reserves. That just seems really odd."

Finland borders on Russia. There is water and another country (Sweden) between Finland and Norway.

It's a lot cheaper to move oil (and gas) via pipelines across land than is is to move it by ship from a non-neighboring country.

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Response to dumbcat (Reply #8)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 06:03 PM

9. I know exactly where Finland is located

And I know that there have always been tensions between Finland and Russia. Besides, Barents Sea production is right there at the border between Norway and Finland. The Finnish oil imports was just an aside. My main point is about startups.

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Response to yortsed snacilbuper (Original post)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 01:39 PM

4. I first saw this technology when Jacques Cousteau's Alcyone visited San Francisco in the eighties

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Response to Brother Buzz (Reply #4)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 05:06 PM

6. Cool!

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Response to yortsed snacilbuper (Reply #6)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 07:14 PM

10. Cool was for this sailor to notice it could sail directly into the wind

I watched it sail out the Golden Gate "steaming" directly into the wind. I'd heard that it was visiting the San Francisco bay, and it was only a by chance I caught it from the Marin headlands as it was leaving.


This was the perspective I was looking at it, only the water was blue


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Response to yortsed snacilbuper (Original post)

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